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Total 150 results found since Jan 2013.

Taller people have increased risk for developing atrial fibrillation
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Taller people have an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AFib), an irregular and often rapid heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to a new Penn Medicine study. The research, which reveals a strong link between the genetic variants associated with height and one's risk for AFib, is the among the first to demonstrate that height may be a causal -- not correlated -- risk factor for AFib.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anticoagulant benefits for atrial fibrillation decrease with age
(University of California - San Francisco) The net clinical benefit of anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation (AF) -- one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats and a leading cause of stroke -- decreases with age, as the risk of death from other factors diminishes their benefit in older patients, according to a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increased exercise over the age of 60 reduces risk of heart disease and stroke
(European Society of Cardiology) People over the age of 60 should do more exercise not less in order to prevent heart disease and stroke, according to findings from a study of over 1.1 million elderly people published in the European Heart Journal.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep and sleepiness 'a huge problem' for people with spinal cord injury
(University of Calgary) A new study led by a University of Calgary researcher at the Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) finds that fatigue and sleep may need more attention in order to prevent issues like stroke after spinal cord injury.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Group calls on international community to prevent dementia by preventing stroke
(University of Western Ontario) The risk factors for stroke and dementia are the same, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates that preventing stroke can also prevent some dementias. Now, a group of experts led by Western University Professor, Dr. Vladimir Hachinski and international collaborators Matthias Endres, Martin Dichgans and Zaven Khachaturian are calling on the global community to come together to take action on preventing dementia by preventing stroke. " The evidence for doing so is incontestable; the time to act is now, " the authors write.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Da Vinci's hand impairment caused by nerve damage, not stroke, suggests new study
(SAGE) A fainting episode causing traumatic nerve damage affecting his right hand could be why Leonardo da Vinci's painting skills were hampered in his late career. While the impairment affected his ability to hold palettes and brushes to paint with his right hand, he was able to continue teaching and drawing with his left hand. According to most authors, the origin of da Vinci's right hand palsy was related to a stroke.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Innovative model improves access to life-saving stroke care
(Society of Interventional Radiology) Training interventional radiologists to perform endovascular thrombectomies results in positive outcomes for patients experiencing stroke, according to a study presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting. Expanding access to this treatment provides patients timely access to this gold-standard treatment.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stroke drug may also prevent Alzheimer's disease, say USC researchers
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that a drug currently being developed to treat stroke patients could also prevent Alzheimer's disease. The study, which will be published Jan. 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the genetically engineered protein 3K3A-APC protects the brains of mice with Alzheimer's-like symptoms, reducing the buildup of toxic peptides and preventing memory loss.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stroke produces dysfunctional brain cells
(Society for Neuroscience) Mice produce new neurons in the hippocampus following a stroke that fail to develop properly, finds new research published in JNeurosci. Intervening in the production of these cells may help to mitigate stroke-induced memory impairments.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study reveals 'startling' risk of stroke
(Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation) Globally, one in four people over age 25 is at risk for stroke during their lifetime, according to a new scientific study.Researchers found a nearly five-fold difference in lifetime stroke risk worldwide, with the highest risk in East Asia and Central and Eastern Europe, and lowest in sub-Saharan Africa. The lifetime stroke risk for 25-year-olds in 2016 ranged from 8 percent to 39 percent, depending on where they live; people in China have the highest risk.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

We need to talk about sexuality after stroke
(SAGE) Stroke survivors and their partners are not adequately supported to deal with changes to their relationships, self-identity, gender roles and intimacy following stroke, according to new research from the University of Sydney.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows in-home therapy effective for stroke rehabilitation
(University of California - Irvine) Stroke remains a leading cause of human disability and rehabilitation therapy can help. Supervised in-home rehabilitation therapy delivered via telemedicine can be as effective as in-clinic rehabilitation program as an alternative for stroke survivors who can't sustain in-person visits for reasons that may include high cost, difficulty traveling to a provider or few regionally available care providers.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stroke affects more than just the physical
(American Academy of Neurology) A new study looks at what problems affect people most after a stroke and it provides a broader picture than what some may usually expect to see. Stroke affects more than just physical functioning, according to a study is published the March 28, 2018, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu and pneumonia infections increase risk of having a heart attack and stroke
(European Lung Foundation) People who have had flu or pneumonia may be six times more likely to suffer from a heart attack or stroke in the days after infection, according to new research published in the European Respiratory Journal.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emotional support is key for stroke patients, research suggests
(University of Edinburgh) Doctors caring for severe stroke patients need to take account of their psychological needs and help prepare families for the possibility that they may not recover, a study suggests.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Newborn babies who suffered stroke regain language function in opposite side of brain
(Georgetown University Medical Center) A stroke in a baby -- even a big one -- does not have the same lasting impact as a stroke in an adult. A study led by Georgetown University Medical Center investigators found that a decade or two after a 'perinatal' stroke damaged the left 'language' side of the brain, affected teenagers and young adults used the right sides of their brain for language.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Peii Chen awarded NIDILRR Grant for stroke research at Kessler Foundation
(Kessler Foundation) Peii Chen, PhD, of Kessler Foundation has been awarded a 2017 Field-Initiated Project grant by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR). The three-year $600,000 federal grant funds her innovative project, 'Development of a Virtual Reality Spatial Retraining Therapy to Improve Neglect in Stroke Survivors.'
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MossRehab first in Northest to offer new stroke shoulder pain device
(Einstein Healthcare Network/MossRehab) MossRehab, one of the country's leading rehabilitation institutes, is now offering the SPRINT Peripheral Nerve Stimulation (PNS) System, a non-narcotic therapy for the relief of shoulder pain following a stroke. " Most pain relief options are not ideal including prescription opioids, which can provide effective, non-invasive relief, but often come with significant negative side effects, " said Dr. Michael Saulino of MossRehab who will be performing the outpatient procedure.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experiences of stroke survivors with visual impairments examined
(University of Liverpool) A new University of Liverpool study, published in Brain and Behaviour, identifies simple measures that could substantially improve the quality of life of stroke survivors with visual impairments.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Retraining the brain to see after stroke
(University of Rochester Medical Center) A new study out today in Neurology, provides the first evidence that rigorous visual training restores rudimentary sight in patients who went partially blind after suffering a stroke, while patients who did not train continued to get progressively worse.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How physical exercise aids in stroke recovery
(Frontiers) Study shoes that mice that had free-access to a running wheel were able to maintain ocular dominance plasticity after suffering a stroke, compared to those that didn't. These exciting observations have the potential to provide a simple but effective method to protect and rehabilitate patients that are prone to, or have already suffered, a stroke.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Alcohol may increase risk of some types of stroke but not others
(BioMed Central) Light and moderate alcohol consumption of up to two drinks per day is associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke but seems to have no effect on a person's risk of hemorrhagic stroke, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Medicine. High-to-heavy drinking was found to be associated with increased risk of all stroke types.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New hope for recovery of hand movement for stroke patients
(Newcastle University) Stroke patients are starting a trial of a new electronic device to recover movement and control of their hand.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Global study shows stroke largely preventable
(McMaster University) Ten risk factors that can be modified are responsible for nine of 10 strokes worldwide, but the ranking of those factors vary regionally, according to a study of 26,000 people worldwide led by McMaster University researchers and published in The Lancet. This should influence the development of strategies for stroke reduction, the researchers say.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Predicting language deficits after stroke with connectome-based imaging
(Medical University of South Carolina) In a recent Journal of Neuroscience article, investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and the University of South Carolina report that imaging all of the brain's connections after stroke in addition to imaging only the areas of cortical tissue damage could better predict which patients will have language deficits and how severe those deficits will be. Such imaging could also be used to guide rehabilitative therapy.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Kaiser Permanente study: National rates of death due to heart disease, stroke leveling off
(Kaiser Permanente) After more than a decade of steady improvements, the decline in mortality rates from heart disease and stroke has slowed nationally and nearly leveled out since 2011, according to a new analysis from Kaiser Permanente published in JAMA Cardiology.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

NYU Tandon team devises a smarter way for stroke patients to rehabilitate
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) A team of students from the NYU Tandon School of Engineering is using smartphones to improve the process patients must typically undergo to relearn the basic skills they lose after suffering a stroke. The centerpieces are wearable mechatronic devices that are connected inexpensively by a smartphone. When a patient performs an exercise assigned by a physician or physical therapist, microcontrollers quantify the action and display the information via smartphone to the patient and medical providers.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Intervention methods of stroke need to focus on prevention for blacks to reduce stroke mortality
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Blacks are four times more likely than their white counterparts to die from stroke at age 45.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New research gathers more evidence for innovative stroke treatment
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) New research has provided more evidence that an innovative treatment strategy may help prevent brain swelling and death in stroke patients. J. Marc Simard, professor of neurosurgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, along with colleagues at Yale University and Massachusetts General Hospital, found that Cirara, an investigational drug, powerfully reduced brain swelling and death in patients who had suffered a type of large stroke called malignant infarction, which normally carries a high mortality rate.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The S-stroke or I-stroke?
(University of Tsukuba) The year 2016 is an Olympic year. Developments in high-performance swimwear for swimming continue to advance, along with other areas of scientific research. One area of research has focused on which type of crawl stroke is more effective -- when the arm draws a curve in the water (S-stroke) or moves straight (I-stroke) -- long a matter of debate in the world of competitive swimming.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Alpha-blockers associated with d risk of stroke in older men
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Older men starting α-blockers-blockers, commonly used for treating enlarged prostates, have a higher risk of ischemic stroke during the initiation phase, although this effect is not apparent in men already taking other blood pressure medications, found new research in Canadian Medical Association Journal.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 7, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Ultrasound examinations can identify patients at risk of stroke
(Umea University) Ultrasound, a non-invasive technique commonly used to study the presence of atherosclerosis disease in blood vessels, can be used to identify patients at increased risk of future stroke who could benefit from surgery. Since surgical treatment to prevent stroke is only considered beneficial to some, ultrasound can prove useful in preventing unnecessary surgical intervention, new research at Umeå University in Sweden shows.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

A SMARTer approach to stroke care
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Time is critical when it comes to stroke, and early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. MRI scans provide detailed images but take longer to complete than CT scans, which are commonly used in most centers.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

SAGE to begin publishing the International Journal of Stroke January 2016
(SAGE Publications) SAGE, one of the world's leading independent and academic publishers, has today announced that it is to publish the International Journal of Stroke, the official journal of the World Stroke Organization incorporating the International Stroke Society and the World Stroke Federation.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Men who live alone run a greater risk of dying prematurely after stroke
(University of Gothenburg) Men who live alone have a considerably greater long-term risk of dying prematurely than other patients. This is shown in a doctoral thesis that followed 1,090 stroke cases in western Sweden.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 20, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Nurse staffing and mortality in stroke centers
(PLOS) Hospital staffing levels have been associated with patient outcomes, but staffing on weekends has not been well studied. To helpaddress the paucity of research, Dr. Benjamin Bray of King's College London and Royal College of Physicians, UK, and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study of weekend staffing with stroke specialist physicians for patients admitted to 103 stroke units in England, published in this issue of PLOS Medicine.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 19, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Kessler funded as satellite site for NIH Stroke Trials Network
(Kessler Foundation) NIH StrokeNet brings together teams of research experts specializing in prevention, treatment and recovery. Working with the broader stroke community, they identify priorities for stroke research protocols and provide training for stroke researchers. Kessler Foundation, which specializes in research in stroke rehabilitation and neuroimaging, connects with the new network via Columbia University in New York City, one of the regional centers in NIH StrokeNet.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Endurance runners more likely to die of heat stroke than heart condition
(American College of Cardiology) Heat stroke is 10 times more likely than cardiac events to be life-threatening for runners during endurance races in warm climates, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The authors noted the findings may play a role in the ongoing debate over pre-participation ECG screenings for preventing sudden death in athletes by offering a new perspective on the greatest health risk for runners.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

When couples disagree on stroke recovery, one partner can suffer
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) In the first mixed-method study on the topic, a University of Cincinnati researcher is reporting that when a stroke survivor and his/her caregiving spouse disagree on the survivor's rate of recovery, the caregiver is more likely to experience depression and emotional distress. Assistant Professor Michael McCarthy, PhD, working with co-author Karen Lyons at Oregon Health and Science University, found that the magnitude of the discrepancy in spousal perception is key to predicting depression in caregivers.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

USF study: Blood-brain barrier repair after stroke may prevent chronic brain deficits
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) Following ischemic stroke, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, which prevents harmful substances such as inflammatory molecules from entering the brain, can be impaired in cerebral areas distant from initial ischemic insult. This disruptive condition, known as diaschisis, can lead to chronic post-stroke deficits, University of South Florida researchers report in a recent issue of the Journal of Comparative Neurology.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Drinking alcohol several times a week increases the risk of stroke mortality
(University of Eastern Finland) Consuming alcohol more frequently than twice a week increases the risk of stroke mortality in men, according to a study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. The results show that the effects of alcohol are not limited to the amount consumed, but also the frequency of drinking matters.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Stroke patients may benefit from new routines
(University of Copenhagen) People who have suffered a stroke often experience severe fatigue. But doctors find it hard to help these patients as their experiences of fatigue may not necessarily be caused by physiological problems. New research from University of Copenhagen suggests that dreams of returning to everyday life as it was before the stroke may contribute to the patients' experiences of fatigue and that it may be a help to establish new routines instead of trying to regain old ones.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 14, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

MU study suggests new rehabilitation methods for amputees and stroke patients
(University of Missouri-Columbia) When use of a dominant hand is lost by amputation or stroke, a patient is forced to compensate by using the nondominant hand exclusively for precision tasks like writing or drawing. Presently, the behavioral and neurological effects of chronic, forced use of the nondominant hand are largely understudied and unknown. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have shed light on how a patient compensates when losing a dominant hand and suggest improved rehabilitation techniques for those suffering from amputation or stroke.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 12, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New therapy helps to improve audio and visual perception in stroke patients
(Saarland University) Stroke is one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide. Many stroke survivors are left with serious health problems. Some patients, for example, find themselves unable to perceive one side of their body and can have problems seeing, hearing and feeling on that side. A team of neuropsychologists at Saarland University, led by Professor Georg Kerkhoff, has developed a new technique that is helping to restore patients' perception of sounds and images.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Shingles linked to increased risk of stroke in young adults
(American Academy of Neurology) Having shingles may increase the risk of having a stroke years later, according to research published in the January 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 2, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Stroke researchers report improvement in spatial neglect with prism adaptation therapy
(Kessler Foundation) Stroke rehabilitation researchers report improvement in spatial neglect with prism adaptation therapy. This new study supports behavioral classification of patients with spatial neglect as a valuable tool for assigning targeted, effective early rehabilitation with prism adaptation. Results of the study, "Presence of motor-intentional aiming deficit predicts functional improvement of spatial neglect with prism adaptation" DOI: 10.1177/1545968313516872 were published ahead of print in Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair on December 27, 2013.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 27, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai named to new NIH Stroke Research Network
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is an inaugural member of the NIH's Stroke Trials Network. It will receive a 5-year, $1.3 million grant to build a collaborative research infrastructure for a NYC regional coordinating stroke center.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 20, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study: Higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke found in food desert
(Indiana University) A study being discussed Tuesday during the American Public Health Association's annual meeting examined the health impact of developing a grocery store in a low-income urban neighborhood on the east side of Indianapolis. Researchers from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the Marion County Public Health Department found that residents of the community have much higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke than in other areas of Marion County.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 5, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Flu shot halves risk of heart attack or stroke in people with history of heart attack, study finds
(Women's College Hospital) The flu vaccine may not only ward off serious complications from influenza, it may also reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke by more than 50 percent among those who have had a heart attack, according to new research led by Dr. Jacob Udell, a cardiologist at Women's College Hospital and clinician-scientist at the University of Toronto. What's more, the vaccine's heart protective effects may be even greater among those who receive a more potent vaccine.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 22, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Excessive alcohol consumption increases the progression of atherosclerosis and the risk of stroke
(University of Eastern Finland) A Finnish population-based study showed that binge drinking was associated with increased atherosclerotic progression in an 11-year follow-up of middle-aged men. The progression of atherosclerosis was increased among men who consumed 6 drinks or more on one occasion. In addition, the risk of stroke increased among men who had at least one hangover per year.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 21, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news