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Total 559 results found since Jan 2013.

Researchers create smartphone device that performs blood tests
Researchers have created a smartphone device that can perform blood tests - a creation they say could "improve the quality of life" for people undergoing treatment for the prevention of blood clots.The formation of blood clots in the arteries and veins can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Individuals at high risk of blood clots are often treated with anticoagulants - drugs that thin the blood and prevent the clotting process.However, anticoagulant therapy requires patients to undergo frequent monitoring of blood flow in the hospital.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 22, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Ultrasound can identify pregnant woman with preeclampsia at risk for respiratory failure, study says
An ultrasound of the lungs could help doctors quickly determine if a pregnant woman with preeclampsia is at risk for respiratory failure, suggests preliminary research published in the April issue of Anesthesiology.About 60,000 women worldwide die as a result of preeclampsia, which causes severely high blood pressure. Potential complications include stroke, bleeding and excess fluid in the lungs - called pulmonary edema - which can lead to respiratory failure.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Cardioprotection provided by post-heart attack biological events
Heart attack and stroke are among the most serious threats to health. But novel research at UT Southwestern Medical Center has linked two major biological processes that occur at the onset of these traumatic events and, ultimately, can lead to protection for the heart.On one end of the cascade is the so-called Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), and at the other end are numerous proteins with modified glucose molecules attached to them. For years, researchers have made countless observations relating to these opposite ends of the spectrum.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Brain damage caught in the act
Scientists have uncovered how inflammation and lack of oxygen conspire to cause brain damage in conditions such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease.The discovery, published in Neuron, brings researchers a step closer to finding potential targets to treat neurodegenerative disorders.Chronic inflammation and hypoxia, or oxygen deficiency, are hallmarks of several brain diseases, but little was known about how they contribute to symptoms such as memory loss.The study used state-of-the-art techniques that reveal the movements of microglia, the brain's resident immune cells.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

Children in the UK are eating too much salt, new study finds
According to a study in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, children in the UK are consuming too much salt, with much of it coming from breads and cereals.Eating too much salt is one of the main factors behind high blood pressure, which in turn increases risk for heart disease and stroke. Previous studies have suggested that children who eat excessive amounts of salt are 40% more likely to have high blood pressure, compared with children who eat lower amounts of salt.In the US, the American Heart Association recommend that people eat no more than 3.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 11, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Obese kids: inadequate sleep may increase heart disease risk
Telling adolescents to get enough sleep can sometimes be a tall order, but a new study in The Journal of Pediatrics reminds us just how important a good night's sleep can be. It suggests obese youths who do not get adequate sleep may increase their risk for developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke.The researchers, from the University of Michigan Health System and Baylor University, say the combination of inadequate sleep and obesity has been linked to raised risks of cardiovascular diseases in adults and younger children.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 6, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Single-patient trials helpful in determining statin tolerability
Single-patient, or n-of-1, trials may be a useful method for determining which patients are experiencing true statin-related discomfort and which patients may be able to continue therapy, according to an article being published in Annals of Internal Medicine.Statins are recommended to reduce risk for heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular problems. Myalgia (muscle pain or discomfort) is a common complaint among patients taking statins and a common reason for discontinuation of therapy. However, it can be difficult to determine whether statins are the cause of patient discomfort.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Statins Source Type: news

Likelihood of strokes and heart attacks may be predicted by carotid artery MRI
Noninvasive imaging of carotid artery plaque with MRI can accurately predict future cardiovascular events like strokes and heart attacks in people without a history of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.Researchers have long known that some arterial plaque is more dangerous because of its vulnerability to rupture. MRI can discern features of vulnerable plaque, such as a lipid core with a thin fibrous cap. This ability makes MRI a potentially valuable tool for identifying patients at risk for subsequent cardiovascular events.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Anti-coagulant treatment for atrial fibrillation does not worsen outcomes for patients with kidney disease
Although some research has suggested that the use of the anticoagulant warfarin for atrial fibrillation among patients with chronic kidney disease would increase the risk of death or stroke, a study that included more than 24,000 patients found a lower l-year risk of the combined outcomes of death, heart attack or stroke without a higher risk of bleeding, according to a study in JAMA. Juan Jesus Carrero, Ph.D.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

Heart attack risk rises after anger outbursts
Harvard researchers who analyzed decades of evidence on links between anger and cardiovascular events, concluded that in the 2 hours following an outburst of anger, there is a higher risk of heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular event.The systematic review and meta-analysis - thought to be the first to examine links between anger and cardiovascular outcomes - is published in the European Heart Journal.First author Dr.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Can you really die of a broken heart?
Losing a loved one can be heartbreaking. But a new study shows that this can be more than just symbolic, as the chances of experiencing a stroke or heart attack after a partner's death doubles within the first 30 days.The researchers, from St. George's University of London in the UK, have published the results of their study in JAMA.They note that, sometimes, grief can lead to extra physical stress and can also make people lose interest or forget to take their medication.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 1, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Study shows value of calcium scan in predicting heart attack, stroke among those considered at risk
A new study shows that coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening, an assessment tool that is not currently recommended for people considered at low risk, should play a more prominent role in helping determine a person's risk for heart attack and heart disease-related death, as well as the need for angioplasty or bypass surgery. CAC screening provides a direct measure of calcium deposits in heart arteries and is easily obtained on a computed tomography (CT) scan."We showed that by using only the traditional risk factors, we miss a significant percentage of individuals at high risk.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Fewer than 1 in 10 Canadians in ideal cardiovascular health
Fewer than 1 in 10 adult Canadians is in ideal cardiovascular health, according to the new CANHEART health index developed to measure heart health published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).Cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease and stroke, is the second leading cause of death in Canada."A large proportion of Canadians are in poor cardiovascular health, and the overall trend has not changed in the past decade," says senior author Dr.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

At family gatherings this Christmas get to the heart of your medical history
Doctors are encouraging people to take advantage of Christmas gatherings with relatives to discuss family medical histories to help tackle ill-health.The call from clinical academics follows a study which shows that individuals with a family history of premature heart disease - heart attacks or stroke in a first degree relative before the age of 60 years - continue to have a higher risk of dying despite earlier referral to GPs, lifestyle changes and drug treatments.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

New high blood pressure guidelines released by committee
Members appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee have released new guidelines for managing high blood pressure, including nine recommendations and a flow chart to help doctors treat patients with hypertension.Published online in JAMA, the guidelines address three major questions related to hypertension - the most common primary care condition, which can lead to heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and death.In a linked editorial to the guidelines, Dr.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

After placing carotid stent, surgeons suggest skipping the balloon
Johns Hopkins surgeons say skipping one commonly taken step during a routine procedure to insert a wire mesh stent into a partially blocked carotid artery appears to prevent patients from developing dangerously low blood pressure, an extremely slow heart rate or even a stroke or heart attack.Reporting on results of a small study described online in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, the surgeons say inflating a balloon inside the artery after placing the stent greatly increases patients' risk of serious complications.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

'No serious heart risks' linked to smoking cessation therapies
The American Heart Association claims that three different types of smoking cessation therapies do not pose serious heart risks, quashing concerns that certain products may increase the risks of heart attack, stroke or heart-related death.Researchers looked at the results of 63 clinical trials involving 30, 508 people who were quitting smoking using either nicotine replacement gums and patches, the nicotine addiction treatment varenicline (Chantix), or taking the antidepressant bupropion (Wellbutrin), which can reduce cravings and other unwanted withdrawal effects.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Smoking / Quit Smoking Source Type: news

Optimal parameter of Neiguan acupuncture for cerebral infarction
The individual difference and non-repeatability in acupuncture have not only restricted the development of acupuncture, but have also affected the specificity of acupoints. As reported in a recent study published in Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 28, 2013), acupuncture at Neiguan (PC6) was performed using a custom lifting- and thrusting-controlled machine. A frequency of 1, 2, or 3 Hz and duration of 5, 60, or 180 seconds were used to observe cerebral blood flow and ratio of infarct volume recovery.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Scientists film early concussion damage and describe brain's response to injury
There is more than meets the eye following even a mild traumatic brain injury. While the brain may appear to be intact, new findings reported in Nature suggest that the brain's protective coverings may feel the brunt of the impact.Using a newly developed mouse trauma model, senior author Dorian McGavern, Ph.D., scientist at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health, watched specific cells mount an immune response to the injury and try to prevent more widespread damage.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

One-third of patients who receive stents and have evidence of arterial dysfunction at high risk for major cardiovascular events, study finds
Data from a new study indicate that the results of an FDA-approved test for endothelial (arterial) function significantly correlated with near-future cardiovascular events, including revascularization, chest pain, heart attack, heart failure, stroke and even death in high-risk patients, of which the majority have had stents implanted. Early diagnosis of near-future cardiovascular events is critical for the physicians who manage these high-risk patients. The study was published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Subarachnoid hemorrhage and cognitive dysfunction
Synaptosomal-associated protein-25 is an important factor for synaptic functions and cognition. Prof. Zhong Wang and team from the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, China verified that synaptosomal-associated protein-25 expression in the temporal lobe, hippocampus, and cerebellum significantly lower at days 1 and 3 following subarachnoid hemorrhage using immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Tighter transfusion strategy recommended to treat anemia in patients with heart disease
Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions should be restricted to those individuals with severe anemia in patients with heart disease, the American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends in a new clinical practice guideline published in Annals of Internal Medicine, ACP's flagship journal.ACP also recommends against using erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in patients with mild to moderate anemia and congestive heart failure (CHF) or coronary artery disease (CHD) because the harms, including increased risks of thromboembolic events and stroke rates, outweigh the benefits.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Treating cerebral ischemia using dl-3n-butylphthalide
Dl-3n-butylphthalide can effectively treat cerebral ischemia; however, the mechanisms underlying the effects of dl-3n-butylphthalide on microcirculation disorders following diffuse brain injury remain unclear. According to a study by Prof. Jianmin Li and team from Hebei United University of China, models of diffuse brain injury were established in Sprague-Dawley rats with the vertical impact method, and dl-3n-butylphthalide at 80 and 160 mg/kg was given via intraperitoneal injection immediately after diffuse brain injury.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Physical activity reduces risk of cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes
The risk of cardiovascular complications in people with type 2 diabetes is directly related to the frequency and duration of physical exercise, according to results of a large follow-up study reported on World Diabetes Day. Notably, those with low levels of physical activity had a 70% greater risk of cardiovascular death than those with higher levels.Studies have shown indisputably that those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are up to five times more likely to develop heart disease or stroke than healthy subjects in the general population.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

New guideline for assessing cardiovascular risk in adults released by ACC/AHA
The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association have released a new clinical practice guideline to help primary care clinicians better identify adults who may be at high risk for developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, potentially serious cardiovascular conditions caused by atherosclerosis, and who thus may benefit from lifestyle changes or drug therapy to help prevent it.Atherosclerosis is a buildup of plaque that can eventually harden and narrow the arteries, potentially leading to heart attack and stroke.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Human movement studied to create an exoskeleton to benefit elderly patients, stroke patients and paraplegics
What if certain patients could get a bionic pick-up without undergoing the pain and lengthy recovery of surgery? University of Cincinnati researchers are working on just that idea, with the start of an exoskeleton to support people who - through age or injury - are limited in their movement.Gaurav Mukherjee, a UC master's student in mechanical engineering in UC's College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS), will present the interdisciplinary research on Nov. 15, at the International Human-Centered Robotics Symposium, which will be held at UC's Kingsgate Marriott Conference Center.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

New guideline for management of blood cholesterol published by ACC/AHA
The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association have released a new clinical practice guideline for the treatment of blood cholesterol in people at high risk for cardiovascular diseases caused by atherosclerosis, or hardening and narrowing of the arteries, that can lead to heart attack, stroke or death.The guideline identifies four major groups of patients for whom cholesterol-lowering HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, have the greatest chance of preventing stroke and heart attacks.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cholesterol Source Type: news

In low-income urban neighborhoods the rates of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke are much higher
There is more to the cost of living in a food desert than higher prices for the few fruits and vegetables sold nearby, according to a study by an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis researcher and the Marion County Public Health Department. The study, discussed during the American Public Health Association's annual meeting in Boston, examined the health impact of developing a grocery store in a low-income urban neighborhood on the east side of Indianapolis...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

High survival rates in trial of new heart valve
Loyola University Medical Center is the only Chicago hospital participating in a landmark clinical trial of an artificial aortic heart valve that does not require open heart surgery. First results from the trial were announced at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium in San Francisco. Results were positive, with high survival rates and low rates of stroke. "This is a major breakthrough," said Fred Leya, MD, co-principal investigator at the Loyola site. "Not only did patients live longer, but their quality of life improved substantially...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Atherosclerosis progression and changes in periodontal health
Taking care of your gums by brushing, flossing, and regular dental visits could help hold heart disease at bay. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have shown for the first time that as gum health improves, progression of atherosclerosis slows to a clinically significant degree. Findings appear online in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Artherosclerosis, or the narrowing of arteries through the build-up of plaque, is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and death...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Second generation transcatheter aortic valve shown to successfully address complications of TAVR
Results of the REPRISE II trial reported at TCT 2013 In a clinical trial, a second-generation transcatheter aortic valve demonstrated low rates of complications that are sometimes seen in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), including challenges with positioning, post-procedure paravalvular aortic regurgitation, vascular complications, and stroke. The findings were presented at the 25th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Improved sex drive after bariatric surgery
The health risks of obesity are well known, with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, stroke and certain cancers. But what is not so well known is how it affects women's sex drive and satisfaction, something researchers from the University of Pennsylvania set out to explore. In a study, published in JAMA Surgery this month, Prof. David B. Sarwer, of the University's Perelman School of Medicine, and colleagues conducted a study with women who underwent bariatric surgery...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Medtronic CoreValve U.S. Pivotal Trial results reveal positive outcomes for patients
Medtronic, Inc. (NYSE: MDT) has announced the highly anticipated results from the CoreValve U.S. Pivotal Trial, the first U.S. data presented on the Medtronic CoreValve® System. The study of the novel self-expanding device, presented at a late-breaking clinical trial session of the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2013 Conference, met its primary endpoint in patients who were considered too ill or frail to have their aortic valves replaced through traditional open-heart surgery, with a rate of death or major stroke at one year of 25.5 percent...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Shorter-term dual antiplatelet therapy after receiving drug-releasing stent does not worsen outcomes
Short-term (3 months) vs. long-term (12 months) dual anti­platelet therapy did not result in poorer outcomes on certain measures (death, heart attack, stroke, and bleeding) for patients with coronary artery disease or low-risk acute coronary syndromes (such as heart attack or unstable angina) treated with drug (zotarolimus)-releasing stents, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being published early online to coincide with its presentation at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics 25th annual meeting...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Personalized preventive care best for older heart patients
Strategies to prevent heart attack, stroke and other major cardiac events should be individualized for older adults who should play a role in choosing their therapies, according to an American Heart Association scientific statement published in its journal Circulation. The statement is a comprehensive review of the benefits and risks of medical and lifestyle interventions for cardiovascular disease patients age 75 and older. It addresses obesity, high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, inadequate nutrition, physical inactivity and tobacco use...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Treating cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injuries with salvianolate
Salvianolic acid B, also called salvia magnesium acetate, is a phenolic acid compound composed of three Danshensu units and one molecule of caffeic acid. Salvianolic acid B exerts strong resistance to oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction, and improves energy metabolism against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Dr...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Protecting the brain starts at the synapse
New research by scientists at UC San Francisco shows that one of the brain's fundamental self-protection mechanisms depends on coordinated, finely calibrated teamwork among neurons and non-neural cells known as glial cells, which until fairly recently were thought to be mere support cells for neurons. The study, which has implications for understanding neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and other nervous system disorders, adds to a growing body of evidence that glial cells are integral to brain function...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Rapid increase in use of novel oral anticoagulants in very elderly patients under scrutiny
The use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) has increased rapidly in Ontario, Canada, especially in people aged 85 years and over, in the 2 years since the drugs were approved for use in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to new research published in CMAJ Open. This rapid increase signals the need to evaluate outcomes from the use of these drugs in an elderly, high-risk population much older than the population involved in the studies. More than 350 000 Canadians, especially older people, have AF, and anticoagulants are used for the prevention of stroke in these patients...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Low-fiber diet tied to higher cardiometabolic risk
A new US study that analyzed data from a large national survey has found a significant link between diets low in fiber and increased cardiometabolic risk, a cluster of risk factors that increases a person's chances of having diabetes, heart disease or stroke. The researchers report their findings online in the latest issue of The American Journal of Medicine. There is already a wealth of evidence that diets high in fiber can help lower blood pressure, cholesterol and cardiovascular inflammation...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Protection against brain abnormalities provided by high serum omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content
According to a new study, high long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content in blood may lower the risk of small brain infarcts and other brain abnormalities in the elderly. The study was published in Journal of the American Heart Association. In the Cardiovascular Health Study in the USA, 3,660 people aged 65 and older underwent brain scans to detect so called silent brain infarcts, or small lesions in the brain that can cause loss of thinking skills, dementia and stroke. Scans were performed again five years later on 2,313 of the participants...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

Nanotechnology urine test could detect deadly blood clots
Blood clots, often unexposed until they break away and result in a stroke or heart attack, can form for a number of reasons in anyone. But now, researchers from MIT have developed a simple urine test that uses nanoparticles to detect thrombin, a major blood-clotting element. The researchers, who published the details of their system in the journal ACS Nano, hope this test could be used to monitor patients who are at high risk for blood clots...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Serious complications risk & high recurrence rates for pediatric atrial fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation (AF), characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat, is the most common chronic arrhythmia in adults, but is rare in children. In one of the first studies of pediatric "lone AF" (AF without associated heart disease), researchers found a nearly 40% recurrence rate and that AF in the young is accompanied by substantial symptoms. Three patients had significant complications: one with a stroke and two with substantially impaired heart function. The researchers' findings are published in the October issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

New technique enables accurate, hands-free measure of heart and respiration rates
A simple video camera paired with complex algorithms appears to provide an accurate means to remotely monitor heart and respiration rates day or night, researchers report. The inexpensive method for monitoring the vital signs without touching a patient could have major implications for telemedicine, including enabling rapid detection of a heart attack or stroke occurring at home and helping avoid sudden infant death syndrome, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Could leptin explain the link between abdominal obesity and cardiovascular disease
High levels of adipose tissue hormone leptin in the blood reduces blood vessels' ability to dilate, and also affects blood clotting, all of which increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. These are some of the results that Manuel Gonzalez shows in his doctoral thesis that he defended at Umea University. Numerous population studies have shown that overweight people, especially those with abdominal obesity, have a higher risk of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Depression linked to higher Parkinson's risk
People suffering from depression may have a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease. This is according to a study published in the journal Neurology. In the past, depression has been linked to numerous other disorders. Earlier this year, Medical News Today reported on a study suggesting that depression doubles the risk of stroke in middle-aged women. But researchers from the Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan say their research suggests that depression is an independent risk factor for Parkinson's disease - a progressive disorder of the nervous system...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Is exercise as effective as drug intervention?
Scientists claim that exercise may be just as effective as drugs for treating common conditions, such as coronary heart disease and stroke. It has long been established that regular exercise is beneficial for health in general, but researchers now think exercise is "potentially as effective" as drug intervention, and they suggest it "should be considered as a viable alternative to, or alongside, drug therapy." Physical activity has well-documented health benefits, yet in England, roughly one-third of adults meet the recommended levels of physical activity...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Exercise 'as effective as drugs' for common diseases
Scientists claim that exercise may be just as effective as drugs for treating common conditions, such as coronary heart disease and stroke. It has long been established that regular exercise is beneficial for health in general, but researchers now think exercise is "potentially as effective" as drug intervention, and they suggest it "should be considered as a viable alternative to, or alongside, drug therapy." Physical activity has well-documented health benefits, yet in England, roughly one-third of adults meet the recommended levels of physical activity...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Statin therapy prior to CABG surgery may improve outcomes
Patients receiving statin therapy before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery appear to have a reduced risk of post-surgical mortality, stroke, and atrial fibrillation (irregular or rapid heart rate), according to an article in the October 2013 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. These same benefits from statins could not be demonstrated for patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). "Heart surgery patients typically have a number of other disorders, so we need to optimize the patient's preoperative condition and help ensure the best possible result," said Elmar W...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Statins Source Type: news

Using one language to relearn another: Aphasia and bilingualism
In the era of globalization, bilingualism is becoming more and more frequent, and it is considered a plus. However, can this skill turn into a disadvantage, when someone acquires aphasia? More precisely, if a bilingual person suffers brain damage (i.e. stroke, head trauma, dementia) and this results in a language impairment called aphasia, then the two languages can be disrupted, thus increasing the challenge of language rehabilitation. According to Dr...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychology / Psychiatry Source Type: news

Bilingualism helps aphasia sufferers relearn primary language
Researchers have found that when a person who speaks two languages experiences brain damage leading to a language condition called aphasia, the second, less dominant language can be used to transfer knowledge to the primary one, helping with rehabilitation. The National Aphasia Association defines aphasia as "an impairment of the ability to use or comprehend words, usually acquired as a result of a stroke or other brain injury." When a bilingual person acquires aphasia, the two languages can be disrupted, making language rehabilitation quite difficult...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news