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Total 558 results found since Jan 2013.

Medical News Today: Congenital heart defect means higher chance of stroke
People with congenital heart defects have a 5-6 times higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke, and a 9-12 times higher risk of ischemic stroke than the general population.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Stroke in marijuana users linked to arterial stenosis
When marijuana users suffer stroke, it is more likely to be caused by arterial stenosis than by cardioembolism, unlike in non-users.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Adults in their 50s should take aspirin daily for heart attack, stroke prevention
The USPSTF say adults aged 50-59 should take aspirin daily to prevent first stroke or heart attack, while taking the drug for at least 10 years may lower colorectal cancer risk.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Stroke brain damage could reveal key to treating addiction
New research reveals that smokers who had stroke in a specific region of the brain were considerably more likely to quit smoking that those whose strokes occurred elsewhere.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Smoking / Quit Smoking Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Poor thinking skills linked to greater risk of heart attack, stroke
New research finds people with poor planning, problem-solving and reasoning skills - known as executive function - may be at higher risk of heart attack and stroke.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Combination of stroke, diabetes and heart attack 'significantly reduces life expectancy'
A new study finds people with a history of stroke, diabetes and heart attack may have a death rate eight times higher than those without a history of these conditions.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: PTSD 'raises women's risks of heart attack and stroke'
A large, new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health finds that women with PTSD have up to a 60% higher chance of heart attack or stroke.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychology / Psychiatry Source Type: news

Older, active, confident stroke caregivers are happiest
Stroke caregivers are happier when they continue to enjoy their own hobbies and interests, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.Researchers used several questionnaires to assess well-being after one year among 399 family members caring for a loved one who survived a stroke. The caregivers were mostly women (69 percent) and married to the person they were caring for (70 percent).In a two-year follow-up, 80 of the caregivers completed the questionnaires again, with most of their answers similar to those at the end of one year.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Caregivers / Homecare Source Type: news

New rehabilitation methods suggested for amputees and stroke patients
When use of a dominant hand is lost by amputation or stroke, a patient is forced to compensate by using the nondominant hand exclusively for precision tasks like writing or drawing. Presently, the behavioral and neurological effects of chronic, forced use of the nondominant hand are largely understudied and unknown. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have shed light on ways in which a patient compensates when losing a dominant hand and suggest new and improved rehabilitation techniques for those suffering from amputation or stroke.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rehabilitation / Physical Therapy Source Type: news

Computers enable researchers to "see" neurons to better understand brain function
A study conducted by local high school students and faculty from the Department of Computer and Information Science in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis reveals new information about the motor circuits of the brain that may one day help those developing therapies to treat conditions such as stroke, schizophrenia, spinal cord injury or Alzheimer's disease."MRI and CAT scans of the human brain can tell us many things about the structure of this most complicated of organs, formed of trillions of neurons and the synapses via which they communicate.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Early strokes leave many young adults with long-lasting disability
One-third of people who survive a stroke before age 50 are unable to live independently or need assistance with daily activities 10 years after their stroke, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.About 10 percent of strokes occur in 18- and 50-year-olds."Even if patients seem relatively well recovered with respect to motor function, there may still be immense 'invisible' damage that leads to loss of independence," said Frank-Erik de Leeuw, Ph.D.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Hyperhomocysteinemia patients with dyslipidemia are more likely to have stroke
Hyperhomocysteinemia and abnormal blood lipids are independent risk factors for stroke. However, whether both factors exert a synergistic effect in the onset of stroke remains unclear. As reported in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 31, 2013), a study by Dr. Xiaoyong Sai and colleagues from Chinese PLA General Hospital is a retrospective analysis of inpatients across a 5 year period from the Chinese PLA General Hospital, based on a matched pairs case control design.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

U.S. health continues to be threatened by heart disease and stroke
Heart disease and stroke remain two of the top killers of Americans and pose a significant threat to millions of others, according to the American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update 2014, published in its journal Circulation.The update reflects the most up-to-date statistics on heart disease, stroke, other vascular diseases and their risk factors. It is the only source for current prevalence data on cardiovascular health. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the U.S. and stroke is the No. 4 cause.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

In the first 30 days of warfarin use, risk of stroke increases among atrial fibrillation patients
Patients with atrial fibrillation - an irregular and often abnormally fast heartbeat- have nearly double the risk of suffering a stroke in the first 30 days after starting to take the anti-clotting drug warfarin compared to non-users, according to a study of over 70,000 patients.The study, published online in the European Heart Journal [1], found that the risk was particularly high in the first week after patients started to take the drug. In contrast, once the first 30 days had elapsed, the risk of a stroke was halved in patients taking warfarin compared to non-users.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Five new avenues for stroke rehabilitation research explored
Treatments based on behavioral or non-invasive physiological stimulation show greatest potentialBecause the concept of permanent neurological injury has given way to recognition of the brain's potential for long-term regeneration and reorganization, rehabilitation strategies are undergoing radical changes. The potential for five new translational interventions was examined in an article published ahead of print by Neurology Clinical Practice. Medical resources are limited, so it is important to focus on areas of greatest potential, according to Dr.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Poor limb motor function recovery following stroke
Negative motor evoked potentials after cerebral infarction, indicative of poor recovery of limb motor function, tend to be accompanied by changes in fractional anisotropy values and the cerebral peduncle area on the affected side, but the characteristics of these changes have not been reported. As reported previously, the lower limit value of fractional anisotropy of the cerebral peduncle in healthy volunteers is 0.36, and the lower limit of the asymmetry of the cerebral peduncle area is 0.83.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Life-saving clot-busting drugs more likely to be administered in hospitals with neurology residency programs
Stroke patients treated at hospitals with neurology residency programs are significantly more likely to get life-saving clot-busting drugs than those seen at other teaching or non-teaching hospitals, new Johns Hopkins-led research suggests. The findings, described online in the journal Neurology, suggest that patients at academic medical centers with neurology residency programs likely benefit from having stroke specialists on hand 24 hours a day, seven days a week...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

COREVALVE reduces rate of death and stroke in sickest patients with aortic stenosis
In a clinical trial, a self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve met the key performance objective of reducing death and stroke in patients with severe aortic stenosis at "extreme risk" for surgery. Results of the COREVALVE EXTREME RISK trial were presented at the 25th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Increasing numbers of younger people suffering strokes
Although stroke is traditionally associated with older people, a major new study published in The Lancet this month reveals that it is increasingly affecting middle-aged and young people around the world. The study, the Global and Regional Burden of Stroke in 1990-2000, collated data from around the world to calculate both regional and country-specific estimates of stroke. They included 119 studies in the research - 58 from high-income countries and 61 from middle-income and low-income countries. The team of researchers, led by Prof...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Carotid artery stenting appears associated with increased stroke in elderly
Carotid artery stenting (CAS) was associated with an increased risk of stroke in elderly patients but the mortality risk appeared to be the same as for nonelderly patients, according to a review of the medical literature published Online First by JAMA Surgery, a JAMA Network publication. There is debate about the most appropriate treatment for carotid artery atherosclerosis and about the safety of CAS (using a stent to expand the carotid artery) and CEA (carotid endarterectomy, a procedure to remove plaque from the artery) in elderly patients, according to the study background...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Excessive alcohol consumption increases the progression of atherosclerosis and the risk of stroke
A Finnish population-based study showed that binge drinking was associated with increased atherosclerotic progression in an 11-year follow-up of middle-aged men. The progression of atherosclerosis was increased among men who consumed 6 drinks or more on one occasion. In addition, the risk of stroke increased among men who had at least one hangover per year. Hangovers increased the risk of stroke independent of the total amount of alcohol consumed. Hypertension and overweight, in the presence of alcohol consumption, further increased the risk of stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs Source Type: news

Risk of future stroke increased by hypertension during pregnancy
High blood pressure during pregnancy could dramatically raise a woman's lifetime risk of stroke, according to a study presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress. "We've found that women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy could be at higher risk of stroke, particularly if they had pre-eclampsia, which is a more severe form of high blood pressure," says Dr. Aravind Ganesh, a neurology resident at the University of Calgary. "The elevated risk of stroke could be as high as 40 per cent." Dr. Ganesh, along with Neha Sarna (medical student), Dr...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

Assistive technology offers a brighter future for locked-in syndrome
A team of researchers from Montreal has found that stroke patients living with Locked-In Syndrome (LIS) who cannot move, swallow or even breathe on their own, can regain a remarkable level of independence with technological help. The team's findings, presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress, stem from a 20-year study that followed the rehabilitation of 25 LIS patients, people who are aware and awake but cannot move or communicate verbally due to complete paralysis of nearly all voluntary muscles...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

IBD sufferers at higher risk of stroke and heart attack
New research from the Mayo Clinic shows an increased risk of stroke or heart attack for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the most common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In this disease, an abnormal response from the body's immune system mistakes food for a foreign substance, which triggers an immune response whereby the body attacks the cells lining the intestines, causing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Crohn's / IBD Source Type: news

Risk for post-stroke dangers flagged by new data-driven machine learning method
A team of experts in neurocritical care, engineering, and informatics, with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have devised a new way to detect which stroke patients may be at risk of a serious adverse event following a ruptured brain aneurysm. This new, data-driven machine learning model, involves an algorithm for computers to combine results from various uninvasive tests to predict a secondary event. Preliminary results were released at the Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting in Philadelphia...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Risk of heart attack and stroke doubles for patients with gout
New research published in Rheumatology journal has found that having gout doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke. The research tracked the health of more than 205,000 gout patients using data spanning five decades to determine links between gout and heart attack and stroke. The findings showed that gout patients are twice as likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke as those without gout. It is thought that the higher levels of uric acid which cause gout are also a strong risk factor for heart attack and stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gout Source Type: news

Ssocio-economic status impacts mortality rates for subarachnoid hemorrhage in US
Americans in the highest socio-economic groups have a 13 per cent greater chance of surviving a kind of stroke known as a subarachnoid hemorrhage than those in the lowest socio-economic groups, a new study has found. However, social and economic status have no bearing on mortality rates for subarachnoid hemorrhages, or SAH, in Canada, according to the study led by Dr. Loch Macdonald, a neurosurgeon at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

What is heat stroke or sunstroke?
Heat stroke, also known as sunstroke, is a serious medical condition, a medical emergency, when the body's temperature rises too high as a result of excessive heat exposure. The body loses its ability to cool itself and overheats. When a person's body temperature is greater than 40.6°C (105.1°F), and this is caused by environmental heat exposure with poor thermoregulation (temperature control), they have heat stroke. Heat stroke is not a fever, where the body deliberately raises its temperature in response to, for example an infection...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

Different risks for heart attack and stroke posed by different hormone therapy formulations
Post-menopausal women whose doctors prescribe hormone replacement therapy for severe hot flashes and other menopause symptoms may want to consider taking low doses of Food and Drug Administration-approved bioidentical forms of estrogen or getting their hormones via a transdermal patch. A new observational study shows bioidentical hormones in transdermal patches may be associated with a lower risk of heart attack and FDA-approved products -- not compounded hormones -- may be associated with a slightly lower risk of stroke compared to synthetic hormones in pill form...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Menopause Source Type: news

MRI may predict heart attack and stroke risk in people with diabetes
Whole-body MRI may serve as a valuable noninvasive tool for assessing the risk of heart attack and stroke in diabetic patients, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by an increased concentration of glucose in the blood. There are 347 million diabetic patients worldwide, and the World Health Organization projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

Platelet Golgi apparatus and their significance after acute cerebral infarction
Expression of soluble CD40L has been shown to increase significantly in conditions such as stroke, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, high cholesterol, or other cardiovascular events. 95% of the circulating CD40L exists in activated platelets. However, the specific pathway of the transition of CD40L is not elucidated, and whether Golgi apparatus is involved in the expression of platelet CD40L still needs to be proven. Dr...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

First study of its kind to show heart procedure reduces stroke risk in patients with atrial fibrillation despite other factors
A new study shows catheter ablation, a common procedure used to treat heart rhythm disorders, may reduce stroke risk for those with atrial fibrillation (AF) - the most common arrhythmia. The multicenter study, published in the September edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), is the first to show AF ablation patients have significantly lower risk of stroke compared to AF patients who do not undergo ablation regardless of stroke risk profile...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Remember to weigh up risks and benefits of new PBS-listed anticoagulants
NPS MedicineWise is reiterating safety messages around the newer anticoagulants dabigatran (Pradaxa) and apixaban (Eliquis) following their PBS listing for preventing stroke on 1 September 2013 - and again for rivaxabaran (Xarelto) which was PBS listed in August for the same purpose. These medicines will be subsidised by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) for preventing stroke in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, and may offer alternatives for some people...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Diabetic stroke risk after AMI drops in 10 year period
The findings were presented at the ESC Congress by Ms Stina Jakobsson from Sweden. They reveal that reperfusion therapy and secondary prevention drugs produced the decline and brought stroke risk after AMI closer to that of non-diabetics. Ms Jakobsson said: "Ischemic stroke following an acute myocardial infarction is a fairly uncommon but devastating event with high mortality...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

Following mild strokes, ultra-early treatment may eliminate risk of disability
In the case of mild or moderate strokes, getting treatment ultra-fast - within 90 minutes of experiencing symptoms - greatly reduces the risk of suffering disability, according to a new study reported in the American Heart Association's journal Stoke. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommends getting to a hospital within three hours of the onset of stroke symptoms. According to guidelines, clot-busting drugs may be given to treat stroke up to 4.5 hours after the onset of symptoms...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Braintone has a therapeutic effect on ischemic brain damage
Recently, the importance of the neurovascular unit, which is comprised of neurons, endothelial cells and astrocytes, has received great attention in the field of stroke, because stroke affects not only neurons, but also astrocytes and microvessels. Within the neurovascular unit, endothelial cells are critical for maintaining normal hemodynamic and metabolic homeostasis. Vascular damage during ischemia often leads to the disruption of the blood-brain barrier and dysregulation of vascular tonus, eventually causing substantial cell death...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

The blood vessels of the retina can reveal stroke risk
Your eyes may be a window to your stroke risk. In a study reported in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, researchers said retinal imaging may someday help assess if you're more likely to develop a stroke - the nation's No. 4 killer and a leading cause of disability. "The retina provides information on the status of blood vessels in the brain," said Mohammad Kamran Ikram, M.D., Ph.D...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

Finding may lead to new treatments for neurodegenerative disease and stroke
In degenerative brain diseases and after stroke, nerve cells die while their support cells activate the brain's immune system to cause further damage. Now Jonathan Gilthorpe, Adrian Pini and Andrew Lumsden at the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology at King's College London, have found that a single protein, histone H1, causes these distinct outcomes...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Stem cell study uncovers brain-protective powers of astrocytes
One of regenerative medicine's greatest goals is to develop new treatments for stroke. So far, stem cell research for the disease has focused on developing therapeutic neurons - the primary movers of electrical impulses in the brain - to repair tissue damaged when oxygen to the brain is limited by a blood clot or break in a vessel. New UC Davis research, however, shows that other cells may be better suited for the task...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stem cell survival after transplantation impacted by melatonin pre-treatment
When melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, was used as a pre-treatment for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) prior to their transplantation into the brains of laboratory animals to repair damage from stroke, researchers in China found that the stem cells survived longer after transplantation. Previous studies had shown that 80 percent of transplanted MSCs died within 72 hours of transplantation. By contrast, the melatonin pre-treatment "greatly increased" cell survival, said the researchers...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Susceptibility genes for cerebral infarction or hemorrhage in the Han in Hunan, China
Atherosclerosis is widely recognized as an independent risk factor for stroke, and its occurrence is closely related to lipid metabolism. Numerous studies using transgenic and knockout animals have shown that scavenger receptor class B type I has a protective effect against atherosclerosis. Previous studies of scavenger receptor class B type I gene polymorphisms have focused on the exon 1 G4A polymorphism and the exon 8 C1050T polymorphism, and these polymorphic loci impact blood lipid levels and are involved in the dyslipidemia in diabetes patients...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Non-Adherence To Anti-Hypertensive Medication Greatly Increases Risk Of Stroke
People with high blood pressure, who don't take their anti-hypertensive drug treatments when they should, have a greatly increased risk of suffering a stroke and dying from it compared to those who take their medication correctly...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

Ongoing Research Into Stem Cell Treatment Of Strokes Shows Promise And Caution
While stem-cell therapy offers great promise for the treatment of stroke, much research remains to be done to show its long-term effectiveness and to understand the potential for dangerous side effects. These are the conclusions drawn by Henry Ford Hospital neurologists Jing Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., and Michael Chopp, Ph.D., scientific director of the Henry Ford Hospital Neuroscience Institute, in a review of their own and other current research into the next-generation treatment of one of the leading causes of death and disability around the world...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Common Painkiller Linked To Heart Attack And Stroke, UK Warning
Common painkiller, diclofenac, raises the risk of heart attack and stroke among patients with serious underlying heart conditions, the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has warned. MHRA specifies that patients with circulatory problems, heart disease, heart failure, or a previous stroke or heart attack should stop using diclofenac. Diclofenac is known under several trade names, including Diclomax, Defenac, Diclofex, Dyloject, Econac, Enstar, Flamrase, Flamatak, Motifene, Rheumatac, Rhumalgan, Volsaid, and Voltarol...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pain / Anesthetics Source Type: news

Research By The Montana Center For Work Physiology And Exercise Metabolism Proves Heat Stroke Death Can Occur Even When Properly Hydrated
Prevention starts with recognizing one's own limits Each year, more than 1,000 people die from heat stroke in the United States. Long thought to be the product of dehydration, traditional prevention and treatment of heat related illness has been to drink more water. More recent research by the University of Montana's Center for Work Physiology and Exercise Metabolism (Montana WPEM) has proven that, while proper hydration is important, the key step to preventing heat stroke is to recognize when one is working too hard for the given environment and slowing down or stopping...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

Diabetes Lifestyle Intervention Does Not Reduce Heart Attack Or Stroke Risk
A long-term, intensive lifestyle intervention program for type 2 diabetes patients that focused on weight loss and exercise did not reduce the risk of stroke or heart attacks, researchers involved in the "Look AHEAD" trial explained at the American Diabetes Association's 73rd Scientific Sessions, Chicago, Illinois. However, the program improved patients' physical quality of life, reduced incidence and severity of depressive symptoms, lowered medical costs because of fewer hospitalizations, outpatient care and medications, and also reduced *microvascular complications...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

Heart Attack, Stroke Risk Increases With Atherosclerosis In Abdominal Aorta
In a study of more than 2,000 adults, researchers found that two MRI measurements of the abdominal aorta - the amount of plaque in the vessel and the thickness of its wall - are associated with future cardiovascular events, such as a heart attack or stroke. Results of the study are published online in the journal Radiology. "This is an important study, because it demonstrates that atherosclerosis in an artery outside the heart is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular events," said the study's lead author, Christopher D. Maroules, M.D...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Atrial Fibrillation Linked To Faster Cognitive Decline, Even Without Stroke
People with atrial fibrillation tend to have faster cognitive decline, even among those who have not experienced a stroke, researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham reported in the June 5th issue of Neurology. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heart rhythm caused by chaotic electrical signals, which are generated in the atria (chambers) of the heart. Atrial fibrillation raises the risk of stroke, heart failure, blood clots and other cardiovascular complications. Approximately 2.7 million people in the USA today live with atrial fibrillation...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

New Technique To Identify Patients At High Risk Of Stroke
New research reveals that an easy, non-invasive way of predicting the risk of stroke or hemorrhage among children who are receiving cardiac or respiratory support via ECMO is by measuring blood flow to the brain. The finding was published in the journal Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. Stroke is the leading cause of death among young cardiac patients receiving support through extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). When a patient can't sustain sufficient oxygen levels in their blood, because of conditions such as heart failure, ECMO is sometimes required...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Stroke Patients Likely Safe To Continue Blood Thinners Before Minor Surgery
A new guideline from the American Academy of Neurology advises that it is likely safe for patients to continue taking blood thinners like aspirin or warfarin before minor procedures such as a cataract operation, minor dental surgery or dermatological procedure. Developed with financial support from the American Academy of Neurology, the guideline appears in the 28 May issue of Neurology, the Academy's official journal...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news