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Speed Vital For Stroke Patients' Survival
The sooner stroke patients receive thrombolytic treatment, the lower their risk of in-hospital mortality and intracranial hemorrhage, says a new study published in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). In addition, the prompter the treatment, the higher the rate of walking ability at discharge. Intravenous (IV) tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a form of treatment proven to help stroke patients within 4.5 hours of onset of symptoms...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stem Cells Aid In The Brain's Recovery After Stroke
A specific MicroRNA, a short set of RNA (ribonuclease) sequences, naturally packaged into minute (50 nanometers) lipid containers called exosomes, are released by stem cells after a stroke and contribute to better neurological recovery according to a new animal study by Henry Ford Hospital researchers. The important role of a specific microRNA transferred from stem cells to brain cells via the exosomes to enhance functional recovery after a stroke was shown in lab rats...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Action-Observation In Stroke Rehabilitation
A new study finds that stroke patients' brains show strong cortical motor activity when observing others performing physical tasks - a finding that offers new insight into stroke rehabilitation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a team of researchers from USC monitored the brains of 24 individuals - 12 who had suffered strokes and 12 age-matched people who had not - as they watched others performing actions made using the arm and hand that would be difficult for a person who can no longer use their arm due to stroke - actions like lifting a pencil or flipping a card...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke Epidemic: New Therapeutic Strategies
Prof Guido Stoll (University Hospital Wurzburg, Germany) spoke on the subject of strokes at the 23rd Meeting of the European Neurological Society (ENS) in Barcelona: "Worldwide, one person dies every six seconds as the result of a stroke. Every year, 250 to 280 new cases are reported per 100,000 inhabitants in Europe, for a total of 600,000 strokes. It is a disease of epidemic proportions, which will continue to pose a host of problems for us." About 3,000 experts are discussing current developments in their field at this congress right now...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Risk Of Stroke Can Be Reduced By Minor Changes In Cardiovascular Health
A report, published in Stroke, showed that small improvements in cardiovascular risk factors reduce the chances a person will suffer a stroke. The report is part of an ongoing national study called Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) which is funded by NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Strokes are caused by abnormal changes in blood flow in the brain or the bursting of brain blood vessels...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Identifying Pediatric Patients At High Risk Of Stroke Or Brain Hemorrhage
Measuring blood flow in the brain may be an easy, noninvasive way to predict stroke or hemorrhage in children receiving cardiac or respiratory support through a machine called ECMO, according to a new study by researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital. Early detection would allow physicians to alter treatment and take steps to prevent these complications - the leading cause of death for patients on ECMO...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Inflatable Leg Wraps Reduce Clot Risk After Stroke
Stroke patients can reduce their risk of blood clots and death by using a compression device that wraps around their legs, according to new research published in The Lancet. For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that the likelihood of dying after stroke is lowered by gently squeezing the legs. Experts believe that the compression decreases the risk of clots in the veins of the legs by increasing blood flow...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Strong Support For The Ongoing Development And Implementation Of Regional Systems Of Organized Stroke Care Delivery
An integrated system of stroke care delivery in Ontario, Canada, has resulted in fewer deaths from stroke and fewer discharges to long-term care facilities because of better access to optimal stroke care, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Stroke care requires specialized resources such as neuroimaging, treatments to dissolve blood clots and other therapies delivered by skilled health care professionals...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke Patients Show Signs Of Recovery Following Stem Cell Trial
As one of the first ever trials to test the safety of stem cells as a treatment for stroke draws to a close, investigators report there appear to be no harmful side effects. Most patients have also shown modest improvements although it is too early to say if this is as a result of the treatment...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke-Related Disabilities May Be Improved By Regenerating Spinal Cord Fibers
A study by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital found "substantial evidence" that a regenerative process involving damaged nerve fibers in the spinal cord could hold the key to better functional recovery by most stroke victims. The findings may offer new hope to those who suffer stroke, the leading cause of long-term disability in adults. Although most stroke victims recover some ability to voluntarily use their hands and other body parts, about half are left with weakness on one side of their bodies, while a substantial number are permanently disabled...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke Costs Predicted To More Than Double In The Next 20 Years
Costs to treat stroke are projected to more than double and the number of people having strokes may increase 20 percent by 2030, according to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. In a statement published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal, the association cites the aging U.S. population as the main reason for the increases and predicts that by 2030: Almost 4 percent of U.S. adults - nearly one in 25 - will have a stroke. This translates into an additional 3.4 million people with stroke in 2030. Costs to treat stroke may increase from $71...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity Suffers Days After Ischemic Stroke Leading To Serious Complications
While the effects of acute stroke have been widely studied, brain damage during the subacute phase of stroke has been a neglected area of research. Now, a new study by the University of South Florida reports that within a week of a stroke caused by a blood clot in one side of the brain, the opposite side of the brain shows signs of microvascular injury. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States, and increases the risk for dementia...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Improves Patient Outcomes
People with strokes caused by blood clots fared better in hospitals participating in the Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke program according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2013. "We found that stroke patients treated in Get With The Guidelines hospitals were less likely to die or end up back in the hospital than those treated at other closely-matched hospitals not in the program," said Sarah Song, M.D., M.P.H...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Why Some African Americans Don't Call 9-1-1 Immediately For Stroke Symptoms
African-Americans know the signs of stroke, but concerns about medical cost, ambulance response time and unfamiliarity with the need for prompt hospital care impacted whether they called 9-1-1 immediately. A study that included 77 African-Americans in Flint, Mich., revealed barriers among adults and youth in getting help for stroke which is significantly higher among African-Americans and leads to more deaths and disability...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

A "FAST" Response To Stroke Can Reduce Long-Term Damage
During National Stroke Awareness Month, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital's Stroke Centers Offer Tips on How to Recognize and Prevent Strokes A stroke can strike in an instant, but can change a person's life forever. Strokes -- 80 percent of which are caused by a blood clot that blocks blood flow to the brain -- are medical emergencies that require immediate attention. The earlier a stroke is recognized and treated, the greater the chance of recovery. Remembering the acronym FAST is an easy way to learn how to recognize a stroke and what to do to minimize its long-term damaging effects...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Recognizing 5 Sudden Symptoms Of Stroke Could Save A Life
Recognizing the five sudden symptoms of stroke could save a person's life, even a young life, according to an expert from the Stroke Program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death among Americans, and about 795,000 people are affected by stroke each year in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Stroke is also the main cause of adult disability. Unfortunately, the elderly are no longer the only people affected by stroke. Close to 20% of strokes occur in people younger than age 55...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Emotional Effects Of Stroke 'As Devastating As Physical Effects' Says New Report
Too many stroke survivors and their families are abandoned when they leave hospital and left without the support they need to help them cope with the emotional impact of stroke. A new report published yesterday (Wednesday 1 May) by the Stroke Association reveals that the emotional impact of the condition can be as devastating as the physical effects. The charity's report, Feeling Overwhelmed, is based on the findings of a survey(i) of over 2,700 people affected by stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

EMS Not Used In One In Three Stroke Emergencies
More than a third of stroke patients don't get to the hospital by ambulance, even though that's the fastest way to get there, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal. Researchers studied records on more than 204,000 stroke patients arriving at emergency rooms at 1,563 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke quality improvement program in 2003-10. Emergency medical services (EMS) transported 63...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

36% Of Stroke Sufferers Do Not Call 911
Surprisingly one in three people who suffer from stroke don't go to hospital by ambulance, which is the fastest way to get there, according to a new study carried out by a team from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, and the UCLA Comprehensive Stroke Center in Los Angeles, and published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Acorda's MS Drug Ampyra Helps Stroke Patients Walk
An Acorda Therapeutics drug, Ampyra (dalfampridine), which helps people with multiple sclerosis walk, also helps stroke patients who cannot walk, the company announced. In a proof-of- concept Phase II study, Ampyra (dalfampridine extended release 10mg tablets) significantly improved walking in patients with post-stroke deficits. Post-stroke deficits include impaired walking, motor and sensory function, as well as manual dexterity - collectively known as chronic neurological deficits. These deficits often persist in stroke victims. Ron Cohen, M.D...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Study Finds Post-Stroke Aphasia Recovery Impeded By Shift Of Language Function To Right Hemisphere
In a study designed to differentiate why some stroke patients recover from aphasia and others do not, investigators have found that a compensatory reorganization of language function to right hemispheric brain regions bodes poorly for language recovery. Patients who recovered from aphasia showed a return to normal left-hemispheric language activation patterns. These results, which may open up new rehabilitation strategies, are available in the current issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

In Certified Primary Stroke Centers, Acute Stroke Therapy Used 3 Times More Frequently
Certified Primary Stroke Centers are three times more likely to administer clot-busting treatment for strokes than non-certified centers, reports a new study by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, looked at a wide sample of hospitals across the United States, and provides insight into practice across the US health care system as experts examine ways to increase the use of this important therapy...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Heart Defect Procedure Reduces Stroke By 73%
A procedure to close a heart defect that most people are born with can decrease the risk of recurrent stroke by 73 percent, according to new data published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings came from an eight year study called the RESPECT trial (Randomized Evaluation of recurrent Stroke comparing PFO closure to Established Current standard of care Treatment). It was made to test the superiority of the AMPLATZER PFO device in the treatment of cryptogenic stroke patients compared with current medical management...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Astrocyte Signaling Sheds Light On Stroke Research
New research published in The Journal of Neuroscience suggests that modifying signals sent by astrocytes, our star-shaped brain cells, may help to limit the spread of damage after an ischemic brain stroke. The study in mice, by neuroscientists at Tufts University School of Medicine, determined that astrocytes play a critical role in the spread of damage following stroke. The National Heart Foundation reports that ischemic strokes account for 87% of strokes in the United States...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Adults Who Experience Stroke Before Age 50 Have Higher Risk Of Death Over Long-Term
In an examination of long-term mortality after stroke, adults 50 years of age and younger who experienced a stroke had a significantly higher risk of death in the following 20 years compared with the general population, according to a study in the March 20 issue of JAMA. "Stroke is one of the leading causes of mortality, with an annual 6 million fatal events worldwide. Stroke mainly affects elderly people, yet approximately 10 percent of strokes occur in patients younger than 50 years...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

"Golden Hour" Access To Stroke Care Increased By 40 Percent: Telestroke Program
Telestroke programs substantially improve access to life-saving stroke care, extending coverage to less populated areas in an effort to reduce disparities in stroke care access. A new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego March 16-23, 2013, found that telemedicine programs in Oregon pushed stroke coverage into previously uncovered, less populated areas and expanded coverage by approximately 40 percent...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

'Dystextia' May Become New Diagnostic For Stroke
Difficulty or inability to write a coherent text message, even in patients who have no problem speaking, may become a "vital" tool in diagnosing a type of crippling stroke, according to new research at Henry Ford Hospital. The case study focused on a 40-year-old man visiting the metro Detroit area on business who showed signs of "dystextia," a recently coined term for incoherent text messaging that can sometimes be confused with autocorrect garble. But in his case, the man saw nothing wrong with the garble...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Rate Of Brain Hemorrhage In Stroke Patients Given TPA Isn't Meaningfully Higher
Millions of Americans take aspirin or other drugs every day to reduce their risk of heart attacks or other problems caused by blood clots. But when one of them suffers a stroke caused by a clot in their brain, some emergency teams might hesitate to give a powerful clot-busting medication called tPA -- for fear that the combination of drugs might cause dangerous brain bleeding. Now, a University of Michigan Stroke Program study suggests this fear may be unfounded, at least for most patients taking common clot-preventing therapies...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

In Elderly Treated With Antipsychotics, Stroke Risk Newly Linked To Specific Drug Actions
Antipsychotic administration in the elderly is associated with an increased risk for cerebrovascular accident, more commonly known as stroke; a new study published in Biological Psychiatry provides additional insight into this important relationship. Antipsychotics are prescribed to elderly patients to treat symptoms such as agitation, psychosis, anxiety, insomnia, and depression. The increased risk of stroke associated with these medications was identified approximately a decade ago and has since been replicated by subsequent studies...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Walking Program Improves Stroke Survivors' Lives
Regular, brisk walking after having a stroke could help boost your physical fitness, mobility and quality of life, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. "Walking is a great way to get active after a stroke," said Carron Gordon, Ph.D., lead author of the study and a lecturer in the physical therapy department at University of the West Indies in Jamaica. "It's familiar, inexpensive, and it's something people could very easily get into...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke Survivors Benefit From Regular, Brisk Outdoor Walks
A new study finds that taking regular brisk walks outdoors can help people recovering from a stroke to improve their physical fitness, enjoy a better quality of life, and increase their mobility. The researchers, from the University of the West Indies in Jamaica, write about their findings in the 6 March online issue of the journal Stroke. After experiencing a stroke, many survivors have less energy and walk less because of fear of falling. They also tend to reduce meaningful activity like going to the shops, visiting family and friends, or going to church...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke Risk Tightly Aligned With Coronary Atherosclerosis
This study demonstrates that stroke risk is tightly aligned with coronary atherosclerosis, showing the closely related nature of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease," said Dirk M. Hermann, M.D., the study's lead investigator and professor of vascular neurology and dementia at the University Hospital Essen in Germany...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Blocked Heart Arteries May Presage Stroke
Even if you are considered to be at low risk for stroke, having blocked heart arteries can mean you are more likely to have one, says new research published online this week in Stroke, a journal of the American Heart Association. The researchers suggest blocked arteries should be taken into account to the same extent as other known risk factors such as atrial fibrillation when assessing patients' stroke risk. Lead author Dirk M. Hermann is professor of vascular neurology and dementia at the University Hospital Essen in Germany...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

The Brain's Innate Ability To Protect Itself From Stroke Damage
The origin of an innate ability the brain has to protect itself from damage that occurs in stroke has been explained for the first time. The Oxford University researchers hope that harnessing this inbuilt biological mechanism, identified in rats, could help in treating stroke and preventing other neurodegenerative diseases in the future...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

How Does The Brain Protect Itself From Stroke Damage?
Scientists from the University of Oxford say they have discovered how the brain protects itself from damage that occurs in stroke. They wrote about their study in the journal Nature Medicine. If we can harness this inbuilt biological mechanism, which the researchers identified in rats, we could develop effective treatments for stroke, as well as prevent other neurodegenerative diseases in the future...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

In Mouse Model, Omega-3 Lipid Emulsions Markedly Protect Brain After Stroke
Triglyceride lipid emulsions rich in an omega-3 fatty acid injected within a few hours of an ischemic stroke can decrease the amount of damaged brain tissue by 50 percent or more in mice, reports a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. The results suggest that the emulsions may be able to reduce some of the long-term neurological and behavioral problems seen in human survivors of neonatal stroke and possibly of adult stroke, as well. The findings were published in the journal PLoS One...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Coronary Heart Disease And History Of Stroke A Fatal Combination
The cardiology service team at the Hopital Bichat and the Mixed INSERM Unit 698 (AP-HP, Universite Paris Diderot), in collaboration with international teams of researchers, studied a cohort of patients suffering from coronary disease. The study showed that those patients with a history of stroke or transient ischæmic attack (TIA) are not only at higher risk of cardio-vascular episodes but also of haemorrhagic events, stressing the therapeutic challenge involved in treating such patients. The research is published online in Circulation...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

New Frontiers In Trauma And Stroke Recovery: Teaching The Brain To Speak Again
Cynthia Thompson, a world-renowned researcher on stroke and brain damage, discussed her groundbreaking research on aphasia and the neurolinguistic systems it affects at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). An estimated one million Americans suffer from aphasia, affecting their ability to understand and/or produce spoken and/or written language. Thompson, Northwestern's Ralph and Jean Sundin Professor of Communication Sciences, participated in a media briefing on "Tools for Regaining Speech" at the Hynes Convention Center...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Prompt Identification And Therapies Can Improve Outcomes In Perioperative Stroke
Strokes that occur during or shortly after surgery can be devastating, resulting in longer hospital stays and increased risks of death or long-term disability. But prompt identification and treatment of such strokes can improve neurologic outcomes, according to an article in the journal Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics by Loyola University Medical Center stroke specialists Sarkis Morales-Vidal, MD and Michael Schneck, MD. The article answers commonly asked questions about the management of perioperative stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Simulations Show How Blood Vessels Regroup After Stroke
By thinking of cells as programmable robots, researchers at Rice University hope to someday direct how they grow into the tiny blood vessels that feed the brain and help people regain functions lost to stroke and disease. Rice bioengineer Amina Qutub and her colleagues simulate patterns of microvasculature cell growth and compare the results with real networks grown in their lab. Eventually, they want to develop the ability to control the way these networks develop. The results of a long study are the focus of a new paper in the Journal of Theoretical Biology...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Simple Home Test Can Halve The Risk Of Stroke And Cut The Risk Of Death For Thousands Of Patients On Warfarin Therapy
MPs, clinicians and patients are uniting to drive change for patients on long-term warfarin A simple self-monitoring test could reduce the risk of stroke by half in thousands of people who currently take warfarin to prevent blood clots...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Mechanical Clot Removal Compared To Standard Medical Therapy For Severe Stroke
Results of the first randomized controlled study to evaluate a procedure that removes blood clots in the brain from patients experiencing severe strokes was presented at the International Stroke Conference in Honolulu, Hawaii. The study also evaluates if imaging techniques were helpful in identifying patients who potentially would benefit most from clot removal. In addition to the presentation, the full study, led by Chelsea Kidwell, M.D...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Doctors 'Reverse' Brain Bleed Procedure To Treat Critically Ill Stroke Patients
Doctors at Southampton's teaching hospitals have reversed a procedure developed to stem bleeding in the brain to help them save the lives of seriously ill stroke patients. � The innovation, which involves placing a thin wire into the groin and passing it up to the skull using high definition TV images, is based on a technique originally used as an alternative to surgery for patients with ruptured brain aneurysms - fluid-filled bulges which force blood vessels to tear...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Improved Outcomes After Bleeding Stroke For Patients Who Undergo Surgical Procedure
A minimally invasive procedure to remove blood clots in brain tissue after hemorrhagic stroke appears safe and may also reduce long-term disability, according to late-breaking research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. Of the hundreds of thousands of Americans who have intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) each year, most are severely debilitated, said Daniel Hanley, M.D., lead author and professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. ICH is the most common type of bleeding stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Better Results After Stroke Than Supportive Therapy Alone Afforded By Treatment With Clot-Busting Drug
In an update to previous research, Johns Hopkins neurologists say minimally invasive delivery of the drug tPA directly into potentially lethal blood clots in the brain helped more patients function independently a year after suffering an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), a deadly and debilitating form of stroke. Rates of functional recovery with the active tPA treatment far surpassed those achieved with standard "supportive" therapy that essentially gives clots a chance to shrink on their own...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Life Support Withdrawal Following Stroke
More than a third of patients who suffer a major bleeding in the brain and have their life support withdrawn might have eventually regained an acceptable level of functioning if life support had been sustained, suggests a new study presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. In the United States, 10 percent of the estimated 795,000 strokes each year are intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH)...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Survivors Of Stroke In Infancy Prone To Seizures, Epilepsy
About one-third of American infants and children who suffer bleeding into brain tissue, may later have seizures and as many as 13 percent will develop epilepsy within two years, according to new research reported at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. Bleeding into brain tissue is a type of stroke called intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Each year, an estimated 6.4 newborns and children per every 100,000 in the United States suffer strokes. About half of the strokes are hemorrhagic, typically caused by rupturing of weakened or malformed blood vessels...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke, Depression And Suicidal Thoughts
Nearly one in 12 American stroke survivors may have contemplated suicide or wished themselves dead, according to a study presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. The proportion of stroke survivors who contemplated suicide was striking, compared with patients with other health conditions, said Amytis Towfighi, M.D., lead author of the study and an assistant professor of Clinical Neurology at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and chair of the Department of Neurology at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Risk Of Stroke Increased By Southern Diet
Eating Southern-style foods may be linked to a higher risk of stroke, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. In the first large-scale study on the relationship between Southern foods and stroke, researchers characterized a Southern diet by a high intake of foods such as fried chicken, fried fish, fried potatoes, bacon, ham, liver and gizzards, and sugary drinks such as sweet tea. In addition to being high in fat, fried foods tend to be heavily salted...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke-Related Disability Not Improved By Clot-Retrieval Devices
A stroke survivor's chances of living independently after 90 days are not improved by the use of devices inserted into the artery to dissolve or remove a stroke-causing clot shortly after the onset of symptoms, according to a randomized controlled trial involving 656 patients. The study, funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health, compared the intra-arterial device-based approach plus the current standard of intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), a clot-busting drug with IV t-PA therapy alone...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news