Query: stroke

Filtered By:
Source: Health News from Medical News Today

This page shows you your search results in order of date. This is page number 11.

Order by Relevance | Date

Total 558 results found since Jan 2013.

Insight Into Cardiovascular Disease, The UK's Biggest Killer
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the UK, accounting for a third of all fatalities through illnesses such as stroke and heart disease. The risk increases with age which is why researchers at Lancaster University have been studying how the cardiovascular system alters as we grow older. Blood flow and other cardiovascular signals from 200 people of all ages were recorded and analysed using novel methods from physics and mathematics, which revealed the subtle changes which occur with age...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

What Is Warfarin?
Warfarin is an anticoagulant medication - it is used to slow down the blood-clotting process. Anticoagulants are used to prevent blood clots which may cause vein blockages, heart attack and stroke. Warfarin is known under the brand names Warfant, Jantoven, Coumadin, Lawarin, Marevan, and Waran. Doctors prescribe warfarin for people who are at a higher risk of forming blood clots. Examples include patients with..: ..blood clots in the veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) ..a blood clot in the lungs (pulmonary embolism) ..an irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation)...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Nationwide Study Maps Atherosclerotic Disease Heredity
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have mapped the significance of heredity for common forms of atherosclerotic disease. No studies have previously examined whether different forms of the disease share heredity. The study looked at coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, peripheral arterial disease and atherosclerosis of the aorta in individuals whose siblings and parents have suffered different types of cardiovascular disease...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Failure To Use Linked Health Records May Lead To Biased Disease Estimates
Up to half of all heart attack cases are missed using just one data source Failure to use linked electronic health records may lead to biased estimates of heart attack incidence and outcome, warn researchers in a paper published on bmj.com today. They show that up to 50% of all heart attack cases are missed using just one data source. These findings may be relevant to other common conditions, such as stroke, and support the wider use of linked multiple record sources by clinicians, policy makers and researchers, say the authors...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

Blood Thinners Cause 7 Percent Of Medication Errors
New research published in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy has revealed that blood thinners account for around 7 percent of medication errors in hospitalized patients. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke by preventing the development of blood clots in the arteries and veins. There are two main types of blood thinners: Anticoagulants - which work on chemical reactions in the body to prolong the time it takes for a blood clot to form. Antiplatelet drugs - these prevent blood cells called platelets from grouping together which could cause a clot...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Aging Brains May Benefit More From Mediterranean Than Low Fat Diet
Brain power in older people at risk for vascular dementia seems to improve more from a Mediterranean diet with added mixed nuts or extra virgin olive oil than from a low-fat diet that is typically followed to prevent heart attack and stroke, according to the results of a Spanish trial. People on a Mediterranean diet consume virgin olive oil as their main source of fat, and eat lots of fruits, nuts, vegetables and pulses foods...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Plasmin Delivered Through A Bubble Is More Effective Than TPA In Busting Clots
A new study from the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine has found that, when delivered via ultrasound, the natural enzyme plasmin is more effective at dissolving stroke-causing clots than the standard of care, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). The novel delivery method involved trapping plasmin into bubble-like liposomes, delivering them to the clot intravenously and bursting it via ultrasound...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Infection And Sepsis-Related Mortality Hotspots Identified Across The US
In the past, researchers have sought to determine the geographic distribution of many life-threatening conditions, including stroke and cardiac arrest. Now, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have created the first U.S. map that pinpoints hotspots for infection and severe sepsis related-deaths - with notable clusters located in the Midwest, mid-Atlantic, and the South. The research is a critical first step in helping to determine which areas of the country require vital public health resources to fight these deadly diseases...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Living Close To Major Road May Impair Kidney Function
May contribute to known impact of air pollution on heart disease/stroke risk Living close to a major road may impair kidney function - itself a risk factor for heart disease and stroke - and so help contribute to the known impact of air pollution on cardiovascular risk, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. The authors base their findings on more than 1100 adults who had sustained a stroke between 1999 and 2004 and had been admitted to hospital in the greater Boston area of Massachusetts in the US...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Water - Air Quality / Agriculture Source Type: news

Cardiac Device Surgery Without Interruption Of Warfarin Led To 80 Percent Reduction In Development Of A Significant Hematoma
A new Canadian study shows that operating without interrupting warfarin treatment at the time of cardiac device surgery is safe and markedly reduces the incidence of clinically significant hematomas compared to the current standard of care. The new findings were released at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society's 34th Annual Scientific Sessions, and are published online in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). At least a quarter of patients that require pacemaker or implantable defibrillator surgery are taking warfarin to reduce the risk of a stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Sun Exposure Could Benefit Health And Prolong Life
Exposing skin to sunlight may help to reduce blood pressure, cut the risk of heart attack and stroke - and even prolong life, a study suggests. Researchers have shown that when our skin is exposed to the sun's rays, a compound is released in our blood vessels that helps lower blood pressure. The findings suggest that exposure to sunlight improves health overall, because the benefits of reducing blood pressure far outweigh the risk of developing skin cancer. The study has been carried out by the University of Edinburgh...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

Risk Factors For Heart Disease Likely Decrease Brain Function Too
Brain function in adults as young as 35 may decline as their heart disease risk factors increase, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. "Young adults may think the consequences of smoking or being overweight are years down the road, but they aren't," said Hanneke Joosten, M.D., lead author and nephrology fellow at the University Medical Center in Groningen, The Netherlands. "Most people know the negative effects of heart risk factors such as heart attack, stroke and renal impairment, but they do not realize it affects cognitive health...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Botox Reveals New Wrinkle In Brain Communication
National Institutes of Health researchers used the popular anti-wrinkle agent Botox to discover a new and important role for a group of molecules that nerve cells use to quickly send messages. This novel role for the molecules, called SNARES, may be a missing piece that scientists have been searching for to fully understand how brain cells communicate under normal and disease conditions. "The results were very surprising," said Ling-Gang Wu, Ph.D., a scientist at NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Epilepsy Source Type: news

Weigh Risks And Benefits Of Old And New Oral Anticoagulants
NPS MedicineWise is urging health professionals to weigh the risks and benefits of oral anticoagulant therapies in people with non-valvular atrial fibulation (AF) following the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) recommendation that newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs) be listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). Following an extensive review of NOACs over the past two years, PBAC has now recommended that dabigatran (Praxada), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and apixaban (Eliquis) be subsidised under the scheme for stroke prevention in non-valvular AF...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Treatment Of Panx1-Related Diseases Could Involve Food Dye
The food dye Brilliant Blue FCF (BB FCF) could be a useful tool in the development of treatments for a variety of conditions involving the membrane channel protein Pannexin 1(Panx1), according to a study in The Journal of General Physiology. Panx1, which is involved in signaling events leading to inflammation and cell death, has been implicated in such diverse diseases as Crohn's, AIDS, melanoma, epilepsy, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. Thus, there is a demand for the development of pharmacological tools to inhibit Panx1...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Immune System / Vaccines Source Type: news

New Oral Anticoagulant Drugs: A Guide From European Society Of Cardiology
A practical guide on the use of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) has been produced by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). A guide was needed to summarise existing information on different drugs, to answer clinical questions that fall outside what drug companies can legally answer, and to make distinctions between the different drugs. ESC guidelines on atrial fibrillation recommend the NOACs as preferable to vitamin K antagonists for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Link Between Air Pollution And Hardening Of The Arteries, Heart Disease, Stroke
Long-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to heart attacks and strokes by speeding up atherosclerosis, or "hardening of the arteries," according to a University of Michigan public health researcher and colleagues from across the U.S. Sara Adar, the John Searle Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the U-M School of Public Health, and Joel Kaufman, professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and medicine at the University of Washington, led the study that found that higher concentrations of fine particulate air pollution (PM2...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Eggs, Also, May Raise Heart Risk Via Gut Bacteria
Yet another study, by the same US research team, links raised risk of heart attack and stroke to the action of gut bacteria on certain compounds contained in digested food. This time the link is to a compound found in eggs: lecithin. Earlier this month, researchers reported in Nature Medicine how they found L-carnitine, a compound found in red meat and added to energy drinks, can increase heart risk because gut bacteria digest it to produce trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a metabolite already suspected of helping to clog up arteries...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Worrying Rise In Sodium Intake In US Over Last Decade
Sodium intake around the world is well in excess of physiological needs (1) and public health authorities agree that chronic excess sodium intake can increase blood pressure and the risk of heart attack and stroke (2). However, despite recommendations to lower sodium consumption over the last decade, actual intake continues to rise...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Atherosclerosis Mouse Model Offers Hope For Therapies For Endothelial Damage
Heart disease and approximately half of all strokes are the results of advanced atherosclerosis with damaged endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessels. In 2009, the direct and indirect annual cost of heart disease and stroke was approximately $312.6 billion. Projections are for the total cost of heart disease to increase from $523 to $1.126 billion from 2013 to 2030. And by 2030, it is expected that there will be more than 148 million of the US population would have heart disease...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Association Between Demanding Physical Work And Increased Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease
Two studies presented at this year's EuroPRevent 2013 congress suggest that demanding physical work has a detrimental effect on an individual's risk of coronary heart disease. The first was a case-control study described by Dr Demosthenes Panagiotakos, Associate Professor of Biostatistics-Epidemiology at Harokopio University, Athens, which evaluated occupation in 250 consecutive patients with a first stroke, 250 with a first acute coronary event and 500 equally matched controls...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Safety-Net Clinics Face Challenges Controlling Hypertension In Their Patients
Federally funded safety-net clinics for the uninsured lag behind other health care providers in controlling blood pressure among the low-income patients who rely on them for care, a new Michigan State University analysis suggests. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular complications including heart disease and stroke, and is especially common and dangerous for patients with diabetes, said lead researcher Adesuwa Olomu, associate professor in the MSU College of Human Medicine's Department of Medicine...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

In Countries Of Varying Income Levels, Adoption Of Healthy Lifestyle Low By Individuals With Cardiovascular Disease
Among patients with a coronary heart disease or stroke event from countries with varying income levels, the prevalence of healthy lifestyle behaviors (such as regular physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking) was low, with even lower levels in poorer countries, according to a study in the April 17 issue of JAMA. "Observational data indicate that following an acute coronary syndrome, those who adhere to a healthier lifestyle have a lower risk of recurrent events...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Protein Discovery In Mice May Help To Restore Function In Damaged Insulin Cells
A team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center has found that a protein long believed to have a minor role in type 2 diabetes is, in fact, a central player in the development of the condition that affects nearly 26 million people in the United States alone and counts as one of the leading causes of heart disease, stroke and kidney, eye and nerve damage...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

WHO Raises Alarm About High Blood Pressure
The World Health Organizations is raising the alarm about high blood pressure on World Health Day 2013. High blood pressure or hypertension kills nearly 1.5 million people every year in South-East Asia making it the single-most important risk factor for non communicable diseases like heart attack and stroke. Between 2011-2015, the cumulative loss in productivity associated with noncommunicable diseases in low and middle income countries is projected to be US$ 7.3 trillion. Most of these deaths can be prevented through healthy lifestyles, early detection and treatment...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

The Squid Beak Inspires Safer, More Comfortable Implants
Researchers led by scientists at Case Western Reserve University have turned to an unlikely model to make medical devices safer and more comfortable - a squid's beak. Many medical implants require hard materials that have to connect to or pass through soft body tissue. This mechanical mismatch leads to problems such as skin breakdown at abdominal feeding tubes in stroke patients and where wires pass through the chest to power assistive heart pumps. Enter the squid. The tip of a squid's beak is harder than human teeth, but the base is as soft as the animal's Jello-like body...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Reducing Salt And Increasing Potassium Will Have Major Global Health Benefits
Results have helped develop first WHO guidelines on potassium intake Cutting down on salt and, at the same time, increasing levels of potassium in our diet will have major health and cost benefits across the world, according to studies published on bmj.com today. Such a strategy will save millions of lives every year from heart disease and stroke, say experts. Much evidence shows that reducing salt intake lowers blood pressure and thereby reduces the risk of stroke and heart disease...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

For-Profit Hospitals Outscore Public/Non-Profit On Performance Measures
For-profit hospitals are outperforming other hospitals when treating stroke, heart attack and pneumonia patients in emergency departments and, thus, will be more likely to receive bonuses under Medicare's new payment rules, according to a new Northwestern Medicine® study. Though nonprofit and public hospitals are lagging behind in performance, many are making noticeable improvements and also many will be eligible for bonuses, too...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Does Surgical Menopause Prime The Brain For Stroke, Alzheimer's?
Women who abruptly and prematurely lose estrogen from surgical menopause have a two-fold increase in cognitive decline and dementia. "This is what the clinical studies indicate and our animal studies looking at the underlying mechanisms back this up," said Brann, corresponding author of the study in the journal Brain. "We wanted to find out why that is occurring. We suspect it's due to the premature loss of estrogen...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Menopause Source Type: news

Small Sensor Placed On The Neck Records How A Patient With Suspected Dysphagia Swallows
Those suffering from swallowing difficulties, especially stroke patients, could be evaluated more efficiently and noninvasively thanks to research under way at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Toronto. Ervin Sejdic, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering in Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering, is developing a small sensor that's externally placed on the neck near the thyroid and records how a person swallows...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Diabetes: Computer Based Interventions Provide Limited Support
Self-management interventions delivered by computer and mobile phone currently provide limited benefits for people with diabetes, according to a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library. Although computer and mobile phone-based self-management programmes had small positive effects on blood sugar levels, these effects seemed to be short-lived. 347 million adults worldwide live with diabetes and are at higher risk of heart disease and serious complications such as heart attacks and stroke because of their condition...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

Carmustine A Powerful Candidate Drug For Treatment And Prevention Of Alzheimer's Disease
Long term treatment by carmustine, a chemical relative of mustard gas and already used to treat some types of brain cancer, can decrease the amount of amyloid β and number of amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. The research is published in Biomed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine. Alzheimer's disease progressively destroys memory, language, and judgement of affected people. While deaths due to heart disease, stroke and cancer may be decreasing, the number of deaths each year due to Alzheimer's disease is on the increase...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

Carmustine Decreases Amyloid β Plaques In Mouse Model Of Alzheimer's Disease
Long term treatment by carmustine, a chemical relative of mustard gas and already used to treat some types of brain cancer, can decrease the amount of amyloid β and number of amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. The research is published in Biomed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine. Alzheimer's disease progressively destroys memory, language, and judgement of affected people. While deaths due to heart disease, stroke and cancer may be decreasing, the number of deaths each year due to Alzheimer's disease is on the increase...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

Fighting Cardiovascular Disease: Updated Guide For Policy Makers, Providers
The American Heart Association has released new recommendations for policy makers and public health providers to combat heart disease and stroke on a local level. The "American Heart Association Guide for Improving Cardiovascular Health at the Community Level, 2013 Update" - evidence-based goals, strategies and recommendations for community-based public health interventions - is published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. "The future burden of cardiovascular disease, unless we can prevent it, is projected to have an enormous economic impact...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Depression, Impairments More Than Twice As Likely In Pneumonia Patients
The long-term consequences of pneumonia can be more detrimental to a person's health than having a heart attack, according to joint research from the University of Michigan Health System and University of Washington School of Medicine. Older adults who are hospitalized for pneumonia have a significantly higher risk of new problems that affect their ability to care for themselves, and the effects are comparable to those who survive a heart attack or stroke, according to the new findings in the American Journal of Medicine...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Depression Source Type: news

Two Different Processes In The Cell Sound A Warning To Biomedical Researchers
Stroke, heart attacks and numerous other common disorders result in a massive destruction of cells and tissues called necrosis. It's a violent event: As each cell dies, its membrane ruptures, releasing substances that trigger inflammation, which in turn can cause more cellular necrosis. A new Weizmann Institute study may help develop targeted therapies for controlling the tissue destruction resulting from inflammation and necrosis. The study, conducted in the laboratory of Prof...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Immune System / Vaccines Source Type: news

Study Finds Fewer Complications After Off-Pump Bypass Surgery Versus On-Pump For High-Risk Patients
Bypass surgery done without a heart-lung machine, known as off-pump, may provide better post-operative outcomes than on-pump bypass surgery for high-risk patients, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session. In the first study to look specifically at on-pump versus off-pump bypass surgery among patients deemed to be at high operative risk, researchers examined the primary endpoint of patients' combined outcomes of all-cause death, stroke, heart attack or renal failure requiring new hemodialysis within 30 days of their procedure...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Pitavastatin, Alternative Cholesterol-Lowering Drug For Patients Who Can't Tolerate Statins
Heart patients who can't tolerate the side effects of cholesterol-lowering drugs may have a new option, according to a new study by researchers from the Intermountain Heart Institute at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City. Researchers found that pitavastatin, a newer cholesterol-lowering drug, may reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and even death in up to 68 percent of patients with high cholesterol who can't tolerate other cholesterol-lowering medications due to side effects...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Statins Source Type: news

National NIH Collaboration To Find Parkinson's Biomarkers And Open Vast Data Sharing Opportunities
Last month, the National Institutes of Health announced a new collaborative initiative that aims to accelerate the search for biomarkers -- changes in the body that can be used to predict, diagnose or monitor a disease -- in Parkinson's disease, in part by improving collaboration among researchers and helping patients get involved in clinical studies. As part of this program, launched by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the NIH, Clemens Scherzer, MD, a neurologist and researcher at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), was awarded $2...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

First Signs Of Heart Disease Seen In Newborns Of Overweight/Obese Mums
Artery wall thickening already present at birth The walls of the body's major artery - the aorta - are already thickened in babies born to mums who are overweight or obese, finds a small study published online in the Fetal and Neonatal Edition of Archives of Disease of Childhood. Importantly, this arterial thickening, which is a sign of heart disease, is independent of the child's weight at birth - a known risk factor for later heart disease and stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Atrial Fibrillation Risk Prediction Model For Women
Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of abnormal heart rhythm, affecting 2.5 million Americans. If left undetected or untreated, atrial fibrillation can lead to stroke. Determining who is at increased risk for atrial fibrillation has been difficult, especially among individuals without established heart disease. But now, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have devised and tested a simple atrial fibrillation risk prediction model, based on six easily obtained factors: a woman's age, height, weight, blood pressure, alcohol consumption and smoking history...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Ischemic Brain Injury Ameliorated ByActivation Of Cortical Type 2 Cannabinoid Receptors
A new study published in the March issue of The American Journal of Pathology suggests that cortical type 2 cannabinoid (CB2) receptors might serve as potential therapeutic targets for cerebral ischemia. Researchers found that the cannabinoid trans-caryophyllene (TC) protected brain cells from the effects of ischemia in both in vivo and in vitro animal models. In rats, post-ischemic treatment with TC decreased cerebral infarct size and edema...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Cannabinoid Trans-Caryophyllene Protects Brain Cells From Ischemia
The activation of cortical type 2 cannabinoid (CB2) receptors with cannabinoid trans-caryophyllene (TC) is effectively able to facilitate recovery among ischemic brain injury patients, according to a recent study published in The American Journal of Pathology. TC is derived from the essential oils of the Cannabis sativa plant, but its structure is very different to other classical cannabinoids - it is not associated with any psychoactive side effects...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

St. Jude Medical Initiates Landmark Study Of Renal Denervation For Reduction Of Heart Attack, Stroke And Death
EnligHTNment trial will evaluate whether patients with hypertension that are treated with renal denervation and medication experience additional benefits beyond a reduction in blood pressure St. Jude Medical, Inc. (NYSE:STJ), a global medical device company, today announced plans for a new landmark study that will evaluate whether renal denervation and medication can provide health benefits to patients beyond lowering high blood pressure...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Clues To Risk Of Memory Problems After Menopause May Be Found In The Blood
New Mayo Clinic research suggests that blood may hold clues to whether post-menopausal women may be at an increased risk for areas of brain damage that can lead to memory problems and possibly increased risk of stroke. The study shows that blood's tendency to clot may contribute to areas of brain damage called white matter hyperintensities. The findings are published in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study involved 95 women with an average age of 53 who recently went through menopause...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Vascular Brain Injury Greater Risk Factor Than Amyloid Plaques In Cognitive Aging
Vascular brain injury from conditions such as high blood pressure and stroke are greater risk factors for cognitive impairment among non-demented older people than is the deposition of the amyloid plaques in the brain that long have been implicated in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, a study by researchers at the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at UC Davis has found...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Researchers Find Gene Variant Linked To Aortic Valve Disease
NIH-funded consortium finds connection between lipoprotein(a) and valve calcification � A newly identified genetic variant doubles the risk of calcium buildup in the heart's aortic valve. Calcium buildup is the most common cause of aortic stenosis, a narrowing of the aortic valve that can lead to heart failure, stroke, and sudden cardiac death. � An international genomics team called CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) found the variant in the gene for lipoprotein(a), a cholesterol-rich particle that circulates in the blood...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Nearly One Third Of US Combat Soldiers Suffer Traumatic Brain Injury
U.S. soldiers in combat often suffer constricted blood vessels and increased pressure in the brain - significant complications of traumatic brain injuries, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. "Research shows that traumatic brain injury is a hallmark of recent military conflicts, affecting nearly a third of all wounded soldiers," said Alexander Razumovsky, Ph.D., lead researcher and director of Sentient NeuroCare Services in Hunt Valley, Md. Constricted blood vessels in the brain are cerebral vasospasm...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Patients Taking Insulin For Type 2 Diabetes May Be At Increased Risk Of Health Complications
Patients with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin could be exposed to a greater risk of health complications including heart attack, stroke, cancer and eye complications a new study has found. Examining the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) - data that characterises about 10% of the UK population - a team of researchers from Cardiff University's School of Medicine looked at the risk of death for patients taking insulin compared with other treatments designed to lower blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

Scientists Identify Culprit In Obesity-Associated High Blood Pressure
Obesity and its related conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke are among the most challenging of today's healthcare concerns. Together, they constitute the biggest killer in western society. New findings, published in Cell, have identified a target that could hold the key to developing safe therapies to treat obesity and its associated conditions...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news