Query: stroke

Filtered By:
Cancer: Bladder Cancer

This page shows you your search results in order of date.

Order by Relevance | Date

Total 36 results found since Jan 2013.

Arsenic exposure: A public health problem leading to several cancers
Publication date: Available online 23 November 2019Source: Regulatory Toxicology and PharmacologyAuthor(s): I. Palma-Lara, M. Martínez-Castillo, J.C. Quintana-Pérez, M.G. Arellano-Mendoza, F. Tamay-Cach, O.L. Valenzuela-Limón, E.A. García-Montalvo, A. Hernández-ZavalaAbstractArsenic, a metalloid and naturally occurring element, is one of the most abundant elements in the earth's crust. Water is contaminated by arsenic through natural sources (underground water, minerals and geothermal processes) and anthropogenic sources such as mining, industrial processes, and the production and use of pesticides. Humans are exposed...
Source: Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology - November 23, 2019 Category: Toxicology Source Type: research

Arsenic exposure: A public health problem leading to several cancers.
Abstract Arsenic, a metalloid and naturally occurring element, is one of the most abundant elements in the earth's crust. Water is contaminated by arsenic through natural sources (underground water, minerals and geothermal processes) and anthropogenic sources such as mining, industrial processes, and the production and use of pesticides. Humans are exposed to arsenic mainly by drinking contaminated water, and secondarily through inhalation and skin contact. Arsenic exposure is associated with the development of vascular disease, including stroke, ischemic heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. Also, arseni...
Source: Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology : RTP - November 21, 2019 Category: Toxicology Authors: Palma-Lara I, Martínez-Castillo M, Quintana-Pérez JC, Arellano-Mendoza MG, Tamay-Cach F, Valenzuela-Limón OL, García-Montalvo EA, Hernández-Zavala A Tags: Regul Toxicol Pharmacol Source Type: research

Introduction to Purinergic Signaling.
Abstract Purinergic signaling was proposed in 1972, after it was demonstrated that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was a transmitter in nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibitory nerves supplying the guinea-pig taenia coli. Later, ATP was identified as an excitatory cotransmitter in sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves, and it is now apparent that ATP acts as a cotransmitter in most, if not all, nerves in both the peripheral nervous system and central nervous system (CNS). ATP acts as a short-term signaling molecule in neurotransmission, neuromodulation, and neurosecretion. It also has potent, long-term (trophic) ...
Source: Mol Biol Cell - October 27, 2019 Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Burnstock G Tags: Methods Mol Biol Source Type: research

Age Well with Smart HealthTech
America is going gray. According to U.S. Census data, in 2030 even the youngest Baby Boomers will have reached 65, and older Americans will make up 21 percent of the population. That’s up from 15 percent today. By 2060, nearly a quarter of Americans will be at least 65 and a half million will reach age 100. These changing demographics give urgency to the concept of “aging in place.” Nobody wants to lose their independence, but that’s the reality for many who are forced from their homes by cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes or other chron...
Source: MDDI - August 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Stephanie Van Ness Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Variation of all-cause and cause-specific mortality with body mass index in one million Swedish parent-son pairs: An instrumental variable analysis
ConclusionsConsistent with previous large-scale meta-analyses and reviews, results supported the causal role of higher BMI in increasing the risk of several common causes of death, including cancers with increasing global incidence. We also found positive effects of BMI on mortality from respiratory disease, prostate cancer, and lung cancer, which has been inconsistently reported in the literature, suggesting that the causal role of higher BMI in mortality from these diseases may be underestimated. Furthermore, we expect different patterns of bias in the current observational and IV analyses; therefore, the similarities be...
Source: PLoS Medicine - August 8, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Kaitlin H. Wade Source Type: research

Sex Difference of Radiation Response in Occupational and Accidental Exposure
Conclusion and Outlook This review summarizes the data from major human studies on the health risks of radiation exposure and shows that sex can potentially influence the prolonged response to radiation exposure (Figure 1 and Tables 1, 2). These data suggest that long-term radiosensitivity in females is higher than that in males who receive a comparable dose of radiation. Our analysis of the literature agrees with the conclusions of the recent report on the Biological effects of ionizing radiation (BEIR VII) published in 2006 by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), United States (National Research Council, 2006). The B...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - May 2, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research

Periodontal Disease Is Associated With Increased Risk of Hypertension: A Cross-Sectional Study
Conclusion: Periodontal disease is significantly and positively correlated with increased risk of hypertension in Chinese population, and exact mechanisms of this association should be explored in future. Introduction Periodontal disease is a complex polymicrobial inflammation, including gingivitis and periodontitis. According to the 2015 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study, the prevalence of severe chronic periodontitis in 2015 has reached 616 million (Kassebaum et al., 2017). In China, the periodontal disease standardized DALYs rate has risen from 24.7 in 1990 to 25.7 in 2013 according to the data from 2013 GBD ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - April 24, 2019 Category: Physiology Source Type: research

Neuroimmunology of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis
Conclusion Recent advances in research on HTLV-1 provide better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of HAM/TSP, and several clinical trials of novel therapies for patients with HAM/TSP have been initiated. However, long-term improvement of motor disability and quality of life still have not been achieved in HAM/TSP patients, and the clinical management remains challenging. Given that HAM/TSP is characterized by activated T-cells in both the periphery and CNS, studies in HAM/TSP will be highly informative for clarifying the pathogenesis of other neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis....
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - April 23, 2019 Category: Microbiology Source Type: research

Arterial thromboembolic events preceding the diagnosis of cancer in older persons
In conclusion, the risk of arterial thromboembolic events begins to increase 150 days before the date of cancer diagnosis in older persons and peaks in the 30 days before.
Source: Blood - February 21, 2019 Category: Hematology Authors: Navi, B. B., Reiner, A. S., Kamel, H., Iadecola, C., Okin, P. M., Tagawa, S. T., Panageas, K. S., DeAngelis, L. M. Tags: Plenary Papers, Free Research Articles, Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Clinical Trials and Observations Source Type: research

Air Pollution and Non-Communicable Diseases: A review by the Forum of International Respiratory Societies' Environmental Committee. Part 2: Air pollution and organ systems.
Abstract Although air pollution is well-known to be harmful to the lung and airways, it can also damage most other organ systems of the body. It is estimated that about 500,000 lung cancer deaths and 1.6 million chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) deaths can be attributed to air pollution, but air pollution may also account for 19% of all cardiovascular deaths and 21% of all stroke deaths. Air pollution has been linked to other malignancies, such as bladder cancer and childhood leukemia. Lung development in childhood is stymied with exposure to air pollutants, and poor lung development in children predict...
Source: Chest - November 9, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Schraufnagel DE, Balmes J, Cowl CT, De Matteis S, Jung SH, Mortimer K, Perez-Padilla R, Rice MB, Riojas-Rodroguez H, Sood A, Thurston GD, To T, Vanker A, Wuebbles DJ Tags: Chest Source Type: research

BMI and Mortality in UK Biobank: Revised Estimates Using Mendelian Randomization.
CONCLUSIONS: Results support a causal role of higher BMI in increasing the risk of all-cause mortality and mortality from several specific causes. PMID: 30358150 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Obesity - October 27, 2018 Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Wade KH, Carslake D, Sattar N, Davey Smith G, Timpson NJ Tags: Obesity (Silver Spring) Source Type: research

Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Strokes in Occult and Manifest Cancers Clinical Sciences
Conclusions—Cancer, occult and manifest, is associated with increased risks for stroke. The increased risk is linked mainly to cancers related to smoking.
Source: Stroke - June 25, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Klaus Kaae Andersen, Tom Skyhoȷ Olsen Tags: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, Cerebrovascular Disease/Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Ischemic Stroke Original Contributions Source Type: research

Prognosis of Cancer Patients with Aortic Stenosis Under Optimal Cancer Therapies and Conservative Cardiac Treatments.
Authors: Okura Y, Ishigaki S, Sakakibara S, Yumoto C, Hashitate M, Sekine C, Fujita T, Takayama T, Ozaki K, Sato N, Minamino T Abstract Aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening comorbidity of cancer patients. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) should be considered for some cancer patients, but neither the characteristics nor prognosis under conservative therapy is well known.We searched our echocardiography log (years 2005-2014) for cancer patients with AS, and 92 patients (54% female) were included in the study. To compare the survival curves, 470 control patients without AS were selected from our cancer registry.Me...
Source: International Heart Journal - June 9, 2018 Category: Cardiology Tags: Int Heart J Source Type: research

Clinical research of goal-directed fluid therapy in elderly patients with radical resection of bladder cancer
Conclusion: The goal-directed fluid therapy is beneficial for stabilization of hemodynamic status and maintenance of oxygen balance of supply and demand, and it is worthy of clinical expansion for good microcirculation perfusion, reduction in therapeutic time and expenses of patients, and less complications and superior security.
Source: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics - March 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tie-Jun Liu Jin-Cun Zhang Xiao-Zeng Gao Zhi-Bin Tan Jian-Jun Wang Pan-Pan Zhang Ai-Bin Cheng Shu-Bo Zhang Source Type: research

Urine Arsenic and Arsenic Metabolites in U.S. Adults and Biomarkers of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Endothelial Dysfunction: A Cross-Sectional Study
Conclusion: In a cross-sectional study of U.S. adults, we observed some positive associations of uAs and toenail As concentrations with biomarkers potentially relevant to CVD pathogenesis and inflammation, and evidence of a higher capacity to metabolize inorganic As was negatively associated with a marker of oxidative stress. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP2062 Received: 14 April 2017 Revised: 13 November 2017 Accepted: 15 November 2017 Published: 15 December 2017 Address correspondence to S.F. Farzan, 2001 N. Soto St., Los Angeles, CA, 90032. Telephone: (323)-442-5101; Email: sffarzan@usc.edu Supplemental Material is ava...
Source: EHP Research - December 16, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Research Source Type: research

Which Patients With Ischemic Stroke and Insulin Resistance May Benefit From Pioglitazone?
The Insulin Resistance Intervention After Stroke (IRIS) trial has reported that treating insulin resistance with the peroxisome proliferator –activated receptor γ agonist pioglitazone hydrochloride reduced recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI) by about one-fourth compared with placebo (pioglitazone, 9.0% vs placebo, 11.8%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% CI, 0.62-0.93) in 3876 patients with recent (<6 months) ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and insulin resistance but without diabetes, heart failure, or bladder cancer. Pioglitazone was also associated with less incident diabetes vs placebo (3.8% vs ...
Source: JAMA Neurology - November 1, 2017 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

Effects on the incidence of cardiovascular events of the addition of pioglitazone versus sulfonylureas in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin (TOSCA.IT): a randomised, multicentre trial
This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00700856. Findings Between Sept 18, 2008, and Jan 15, 2014, 3028 patients were randomly assigned and included in the analyses. 1535 were assigned to pioglitazone and 1493 to sulfonylureas (glibenclamide 24 [2%], glimepiride 723 [48%], gliclazide 745 [50%]). At baseline, 335 (11%) participants had a previous cardiovascular event. The study was stopped early on the basis of a futility analysis after a median follow-up of 57·3 months. The primary outcome occurred in 105 patients (1·5 per 100 person-years) who were given pioglitazone and 108 (1·5 per 100 person-yea...
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - September 14, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

Milk and dairy products: good or bad for human health? An assessment of the totality of scientific evidence.
CONCLUSION: The totality of available scientific evidence supports that intake of milk and dairy products contribute to meet nutrient recommendations, and may protect against the most prevalent chronic diseases, whereas very few adverse effects have been reported. PMID: 27882862 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Food and Nutrition Research - November 26, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Thorning TK, Raben A, Tholstrup T, Soedamah-Muthu SS, Givens I, Astrup A Tags: Food Nutr Res Source Type: research

Expensive New Diabetes Drugs Add Nothing But Cost And Complications
This is the fourth in an ongoing series of blogs exposing the rampant misuse of the medications so aggressively promoted by greedy drug companies. I am very lucky in having the perfect partner in this truth-vs-power effort to contradict Pharma propaganda with evidence based fact. Dick Bijl is President of the International Society of Drug Bulletins (ISDB), an impressive association of 53 national drug bulletins from all around the world, each of which publishes the best available data on the pluses and minuses of different medications. Drug bulletins help patients and doctors see through the misleading misinformation ge...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

How to Quit Smoking
By Stacy Simon Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the United States. Since the release of the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health 50 years ago, there have been 20 million deaths due to tobacco. Almost half the deaths from 12 different types of cancer combined – including lung, voice box, throat, esophagus, and bladder cancers – are attributable to cigarette smoking alone. In addition to cancer, smoking greatly increases the risk of debilitating long-term lung diseases like emphysema and chronic bronchitis. It also raises the risk for heart...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 16, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Smoking/Tobacco Source Type: news

Men From The South Are More Likely To Die From Smoking-Related Cancers
Smoking causes nearly 29 percent of all cancer deaths among Americans over the age of 35, according to a new analysis published in JAMA Internal Medicine. But that doesn’t tell the full story. Men from the top five southern states skew this data, dying at a rate that’s 40 percent higher than the national average. The higher proportion of cancer deaths attributable to smoking in the South isn’t simply because people in that region smoke more ― that distinction goes to the Midwest. Instead, experts say, the lack of funding for tobacco control programs means that there are less resources for people wh...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

September Is Childhood Obesity Month -- Get The Facts
The obesity epidemic continues to dominate headlines--and for good reason. Obesity is a leading cause of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke. Many of these conditions occur in adults but often begin in childhood. This September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. By knowing the facts and taking steps to help your children live a healthier lifestyle, childhood obesity and its resulting complications may be prevented. The Facts According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), one in three children in the U.S. is overweight or obese. Childhood obesity doubled in children and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are broken bones, loneliness and poor sleep really hidden killers?
Conclusion As the researchers say, the WHO definition of health encompasses physical, mental and social wellbeing – not just the presence or absence of disease. But how often are these extra dimensions taken into account when assessing a person's health status? In this sample of older adults, just looking at their disease status puts the majority of them into an apparently "robust" health group. Yet when you consider the additional dimensions of psychological health and wellbeing, you seem to get a much better indication of those who were at higher or lower risk of dying or being incapacitated in the coming...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Medical practice Source Type: news

Daily low-dose aspirin may help combat cancer
Conclusion The systematic review looked at 47 studies and attempted to combine the results, looking for evidence of a beneficial effect of low-dose aspirin on risk of death in people already diagnosed with cancer. The few RCTs identified – the best-quality evidence – did not provide conclusive evidence that aspirin improves survival rates. The rest of the studies were observational in nature, so cannot prove that aspirin reduces the risk of death from cancer. The only significant results were for a 24% reduction in risk of death from colon cancer, and a possible 11% reduced risk of death from prostate cancer. However,...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Source Type: news

Periodontal disease and risk of all cancers among male never smokers: an updated analysis of the Health Professionals Follow-up Study
Conclusions Advanced periodontitis was associated with a 2.5-fold increase in smoking-related cancers among never smokers. Periodontitis may impact cancer risk through system immune dysregulation. Further studies need to examine the immune impact of advanced periodontitis on cancer, especially for cancers known to be caused by smoking.
Source: Annals of Oncology - April 20, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Michaud, D. S., Kelsey, K. T., Papathanasiou, E., Genco, C. A., Giovannucci, E. Tags: epidemiology Source Type: research

Erectile Dysfunction in Individuals with Neurologic Disability: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study
Conclusion: The occurence of erectile dysfunction is significantly more prevalent among neurologically disabled men, particularly those with lesions below S2–S4, than among men without neurologic disability. Considering the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among neurologically disabled men, sexual functioning should be regularly evaluated during acute and long-term rehabilitation, and any existing sexual dysfunction should be addressed in the treatment plan. Introduction Penile erection is a neurovascular event characterized by the dilation of arteries that cause the corpora cavernosa and corpora spongiosum of the peni...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - February 22, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: ICN Online Editor Tags: Current Issue Medical Issues Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Neurology Neuromuscular Disease Original Research Neurogenic SD; Erectile Dysfunction; sexual health; Quality of life Source Type: research

Erectile Dysfunction in Individuals with Neurologic Disability: A Hospital-based, Cross-sectional Study
Conclusion: The occurence of erectile dysfunction is significantly more prevalent among neurologically disabled men, particularly those with lesions below S2–S4, than among men without neurologic disability. Considering the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among neurologically disabled men, sexual functioning should be regularly evaluated during acute and long-term rehabilitation, and any existing sexual dysfunction should be addressed in the treatment plan. Introduction Penile erection is a neurovascular event characterized by the dilation of arteries that cause the corpora cavernosa and corpora spongiosum of the peni...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - February 1, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: ICN Online Editor Tags: Current Issue Medical Issues Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Neurology Neuromuscular Disease Original Research Neurogenic SD; Erectile Dysfunction; sexual health; Quality of life Source Type: research

Ten‐year observational follow‐up of PROactive: a randomized cardiovascular outcomes trial evaluating pioglitazone in type 2 diabetes
ConclusionsThe trends of macrovascular benefits of pioglitazone compared with placebo during PROactive did not persist in the absence of continued pioglitazone during this 10‐year follow‐up. Trends of decreased bladder cancer and increased prostate cancer were observed in the pioglitazone group during follow‐up; however, these imbalances should be interpreted with caution because of the limitations of the observational study design.
Source: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism - January 8, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Authors: E. Erdmann, S. Harding, H. Lam, A. Perez Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

10‐Year Observational Follow‐Up of PROactive: a randomized cardiovascular outcomes trial evaluating pioglitazone in type 2 diabetes
ConclusionsThe trends of macrovascular benefits of pioglitazone compared with placebo during PROactive did not persist in the absence of continued pioglitazone during this 10‐year follow‐up. Trends of decreased bladder cancer and increased prostate cancer were observed in the pioglitazone group during follow‐up; however, these imbalances should be interpreted with caution due to limitations of the observational study design.
Source: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism - November 23, 2015 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Erland Erdmann, Sarah Harding, Hung Lam, Alfonso Perez Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Can You Think Yourself Into A Different Person?
For years she had tried to be the perfect wife and mother but now, divorced, with two sons, having gone through another break-up and in despair about her future, she felt as if she’d failed at it all, and she was tired of it. On 6 June 2007 Debbie Hampton, of Greensboro, North Carolina, took an overdose of more than 90 pills – a combination of ten different prescription drugs, some of which she’d stolen from a neighbor’s bedside cabinet. That afternoon, she’d written a note on her computer: “I’ve screwed up this life so bad that there is no place here for me and nothing I can contr...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 19, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gambia: Drug Addiction and Health
[The Point] People who suffer from addiction often have one or more accompanying medical issues, which may include lung or cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, and mental disorders. Imaging scans, chest X-rays, and blood tests show the damaging effects of long-term drug abuse throughout the body. For example, research has shown that tobacco smoke causes cancer of the mouth, throat, larynx, blood, lungs, stomach, pancreas, kidney, bladder, and cervix.19 In addition, some drugs of abuse, such as inhalants, are toxic
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 1, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Catching Dick: Not Why We Care About Weight
Amy Schumer said in her humorous acceptance speech at the Glamour Women of the Year Awards: "I'm like 160 pounds right now, and I can catch a dick whenever I want, and that's the truth." The line, like many in her speech, is obviously very funny. But the humor is directed at a misperception that is not so funny. With our society's superficial focus on youth and appearance, we have emphasized all the wrong reasons for maintaining a healthy body weight, which has nothing to do with "catching dick." We are sold the idea that remaining slim is primarily important as a means of attracting the opposite sex, rather than as a pa...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Menopause-related hot flashes and night sweats can last for years
According to conventional medical wisdom, menopause-related hot flashes fade away after six to 24 months. Not so, says a new study of women going through menopause. Hot flashes last, on average, for about seven years and may go on for 11 years or more. The hormonal roller coaster that comes with the end of a woman’s childbearing years can trigger a range of symptoms. Up to 80% of women going through menopause experience hot flashes. Hot flashes, also known as vasomotor symptoms, are often described as a sudden sensation of heat in the chest, face, and head followed by flushing, perspiration, and sometimes chills. Whe...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nancy Ferrari Tags: Menopause Women's Health hot flashes night sweats Source Type: news

Do No Harm: Stories of Life, Death and Brain Surgery review
Patients see neurosurgeons as gods, but what is the reality? Henry Marsh has written a memoir of startling candourWe go to doctors for help and healing; we don't expect them to make us worse. Most people know the aphorism taught to medical students, attributed to the ancient Greek Hippocrates but timeless in its quiet sanity: "First, do no harm." But many medical treatments do cause harm: learning how to navigate the risks of drug therapies, as well as the catastrophic consequences of botched or inadvised surgical operations, is a big part of why training doctors takes so long. Even the simplest of therapies carries the ri...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Gavin Francis Tags: The Guardian Private healthcare Culture Society Reviews Books Neuroscience UK news Hospitals NHS Source Type: news