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Make the Diagnosis: Cerebrospinal Fluid Color Challenge
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: A 3-year-old boy with a brain stem glioma develops hydrocephalus and is treated with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. He presents with green cerebrospinal fluid. What is your diagnosis? (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - December 19, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Attractive drug candidate identified to target glioma brain tumors
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) In a paper published in Cancer Research, researchers: 1) identify a biomarker enzyme associated with aggressive glioma brain tumors, 2) reveal the regulatory mechanism for that enzyme, and 3) demonstrate potent efficacy, using a mouse model of glioma, for a small molecule inhibitor they have developed. The inhibitor, GA11, retains a core structure that resembles natural inhibitors of the biomarker enzyme; but it has been modified to help it pass through the blood-brain barrier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The antibody that normalizes tumor vessels
Scientists have discovered that their antisepsis antibody also reduces glioma, lung and breast cancer progression in mice, outlines a new report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The antibody that normalizes tumor vessels
(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists discover that their antisepsis antibody also reduces glioma, lung and breast cancer progression in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 12, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Brain cancer: New biomarker could improve diagnosis of glioma
After analyzing data from many genetic studies, researchers find that a high expression of SHOX2 gene predicts poor survival in intermediate-grade gliomas. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers find new biomarker for brain cancer prognosis
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new biomarker for glioma, a common type of brain cancer, that can help doctors determine how aggressive a cancer is and that could eventually help determine the best course of treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 6, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

IDH1 Mutations Might Underlie Glioma-Associated Epilepsy
IDH1-mutant gliomas can affect adjacent, nonmalignant cells in ways that trigger seizures, according to research reported at the 21st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - November 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Tags: Brain Tumors Conference Report Conferences/SNO 2016 Source Type: news

Cell of origin in childhood brain tumors affects susceptibility to therapy
Children that are diagnosed with the severe the brain tumor malignant glioma often have a very poor prognosis. Knowledge about how pediatric malignant glioma arises and develops is still limited. New findings show that in mice glioma development and glioma cell properties are affected by both age and the cell type from which the tumor has arisen. The tumor cell of origin was also important for the susceptibility of the tumor cells towards cancer drugs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Glioma-Associated Fatigue and Cognitive Dysfunction
As part of our coverage of the 21st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology, we discuss fatigue and cognitive dysfunction in patients with glioma. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - November 17, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: David Cachia, MD, MRCP Tags: Brain Tumors Q & Conferences/SNO 2016 Source Type: news

The cell of origin in childhood brain tumors affects susceptibility to therapy
(Uppsala University) Children that are diagnosed with the severe the brain tumor malignant glioma often have a very poor prognosis. New findings from Uppsala University show that in mice glioma development and glioma cell properties are affected by both age and the cell type from which the tumor has arisen. The tumor cell of origin was also important for the susceptibility of the tumor cells towards cancer drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Superheroes, super kids in super costumes don ’t let cancer stop Halloween
Children from the Jimmy Fund Clinic and their families trick or treat through Dana Farber. Photo courtesy of Sydney Altschuler. Abby Roxo likes to be unique on Halloween, and today she had unique totally covered. The 9-year-old from Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, arrived at the outpatient clinic of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center ready for the annual Halloween parade. Wearing a feathery white halo, white shirt and white pants with large black spots, Abby, who made her costume with the help of her sisters, also drew black spots on her cheeks and wore bright red lipstick. What was she? ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 31, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Irene Sege Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Halloween leukemia low-grade glioma Source Type: news

New device enables rapid identification of brain cancer type and tumor margin
(Nagoya University) Researchers centered at Nagoya University developed a device for rapidly determining whether a brain sample is positive for a mutation commonly associated with glioma, a type of brain cancer with poor prognosis. This device is accurate and quick to use, enabling diagnosis of tumor type and determination of tumor margins during an operation. This breakthrough should improve decision-making by surgeons and ultimately help reduce glioma-related mortality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 4, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

IDH and CIC mutations provide prognostic information for grade II and III gliomas
(NRG Oncology) NRG Oncology investigators have identified two biomarkers that are prognostic of overall and progression-free survival for patients with lower-grade gliomas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

These Parents Want You To Get 'Mad As Hell' About Pediatric Cancer
Like most 4-year-olds, Phoebe Dooley loves toys, animals and stories. She has a wild imagination, a great sense of humor and a wisdom beyond her years. Her favorite color is pink. Unlike most 4-year-olds, Phoebe is battling an aggressive brain cancer that is notoriously difficult to treat. With the help of an altruistic photographer, Phoebe’s parents want to shine a light on their daughter’s story and encourage people to donate to cancer research. On March 22, 2016, Phoebe was diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a brain tumor that affects approximately 300 children in the U.S. eac...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

These Parents Want You To Get 'Mad As Hell' About Pediatric Cancer
Like most 4-year-olds, Phoebe Dooley loves toys, animals and stories. She has a wild imagination, a great sense of humor and a wisdom beyond her years. Her favorite color is pink. Unlike most 4-year-olds, Phoebe is battling an aggressive brain cancer that is notoriously difficult to treat. With the help of an altruistic photographer, Phoebe’s parents want to shine a light on their daughter’s story and encourage people to donate to cancer research. On March 22, 2016, Phoebe was diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a brain tumor that affects approximately 300 children in the U.S. eac...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DelMar, Accurexa ink deal for chemotherapy combo
DelMar Pharmaceuticals and Accurexa  said today that they inked a deal to collaborate on a combination chemotherapy for local treatment of brain cancer. The agreement calls for DelMar to supply the drug dianhydrogalactitol (VAL-083) as part of a combination with another chemotherapeutic, either temozolomide or carmustine, for local delivery to the tumor via Accurexa’s ACX-31 implantable polymer wafer. DelMar said its drug proved successful in more than 40 clinical trials sponsored by the U.S. National Cancer Institute, winning orphan drug designation as a treatment for gliomas, medulloblastoma and ovarian cancer in Apr...
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Neurological Oncology Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Accurexa Inc. DelMar Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Vinblastine First-Line Option for Pediatric Low-Grade Glioma
Vinblastine monotherapy produced outcomes similar to current therapies in children with treatment-naive pediatric low-grade glioma, and had favorable toxicity and quality-of-life profiles. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - September 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: Brain Tumors News Source Type: news

Cancer spreading: Caught in the act
Scientists at the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA have taken a major step toward confirming an unusual theory of how some cancer cells metastasize. Their findings may lead to new strategies for keeping melanoma from spreading.  A commonly held theory about how cancer spreads is that tumor cells break off from the primary tumor and travel through the bloodstream to reach other organs, where they attach and grow into new tumors. But questions about that process have remained because circulating tumor cells in the blood sometimes have a short lifespan, and because of a lack of knowledge about how the cells leave the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 15, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Low oxygen, high risk: How tumors adapt to become more aggressive
Scientists have identified a novel mechanism that selectively operates in hypoxic tumors to enable tumor cells to thrive and continue to proliferate despite a low oxygen environment. The research team showed how the activation of this pathway leads to an unfavorable prognosis for patients with gliomas – a type of brain tumor – and how the pathway could be a valuable therapeutic target in cancer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Low oxygen, high risk: How tumors adapt to become more aggressive
(The Wistar Institute) Wistar scientists have identified a novel mechanism that selectively operates in hypoxic tumors to enable tumor cells to thrive and continue to proliferate despite a low oxygen environment. Dario C. Altieri, M.D., Wistar's President and CEO and lead author of the study, and colleagues showed how the activation of this pathway leads to an unfavorable prognosis for patients with gliomas -- a type of brain tumor -- and how the pathway could be a valuable therapeutic target in cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Calgary girl passes torch to family after dying from brain tumour
Bill Gould said his daughter’s cancer specialist offered some words of wisdom when Natasha was diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) cancer in May of 2015. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - August 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Calgary Source Type: news

Calgary girl passes torch to family before dying from brain tumour
Bill Gould said his daughter’s cancer specialist offered some words of wisdom when Natasha was diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) cancer in May of 2015. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - August 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Calgary Source Type: news

Researchers may have found an 'antidepressant roadblock'
Conclusion This experimental study in rat brain cells investigated the delay in the action of antidepressants. This research hopes to aid the development of faster-acting treatments in the future. It is thought antidepressants work by increasing levels of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, in the brain – chemicals that can improve mood and emotion. The researchers' experiments in rats found antidepressants seem to lead to a gradual redistribution of Gα proteins to the lipid membrane of the brain cells, which in turn affects signalling processes. However, this is a slow process that seems to depend on the dose of an...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental health Medication Neurology Source Type: news

Radiotherapy for diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults
The authors conclude that they could make no definitive conclusions from this review based on the currently available evidence. Further research is needed to establish the role of radiotherapy in the management of newly diagnosed diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults. Future RCTs should be conducted with adequate power and all relevant outcomes should be taken into consideration. Moreover, international multicentre collaboration is encouraged. Considering the potential advantage of hypofractionated radiotherapy to decrease the treatment burden and increase the quality of remaining life, we suggest that more...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Targeting Fatty Acid Oxidation Might Quell Brain Cancer CellsTargeting Fatty Acid Oxidation Might Quell Brain Cancer Cells
In vitro and murine studies suggest that inhibition of fatty acid oxidation could help disrupt metabolic processes in glioma cells, according to UK investigators. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - July 15, 2016 Category: Pathology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Having A College Education Linked To This Serious Health Risk
People with higher levels of education may be more likely to develop certain types of brain tumors, a new study from Sweden suggests. Researchers found that women who completed at least three years of university courses were 23 percent more likely to develop a type of cancerous brain tumor called glioma, compared with women who only completed up to nine years of mandatory education and did not go to a university. And men who completed at least three years of university courses were 19 percent more likely to develop the same type of tumor, compared with men who did not go to a university. Though the reasons behind the link ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Brain tumor risk linked to high education level
A new population-wide study shows gliomas are more common among people who studied at university for 3 years, compared with those who did not. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

If you went to university you’re 'more likely to get a brain tumour' experts find
Men with a university education were 19 per cent more likely to develop glioma, than their peers with nine years education - in women the risk was 23 per cent higher, experts at University College London found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Using big data, scientists discover biomarkers that could help give cancer patients better survival estimates
People with cancer are often told by their doctors approximately how long they have to live, and how well they will respond to treatments, but what if there were a way to improve the accuracy of doctors’ predictions? A new method developed by UCLA scientists could eventually lead to a way to do just that, using data about patients’ genetic sequences to produce more reliable projections for survival time and how they might respond to possible treatments. The technique is an innovative way of using biomedical big data — which gleans patterns and trends from massive amounts of patient information — to achieve precisio...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 9, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Radiotherapy Followed By Chemotherapy Improves Survival for Patients with Anaplastic Glioma
Improvement resulted in 56% of patients given radiotherapy then chemotherapy surviving for five years, compared with only 44% of those who did not (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - June 7, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: Brain Tumor - Aneurysm Source Type: news

'Huge' Survival Benefit, New Standard of Care in Glioma'Huge' Survival Benefit, New Standard of Care in Glioma
Adding adjuvant temozolomide to radiotherapy for patients with grade 3 anaplastic glioma without the 1p/19 deletion is a new standard of care. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - June 5, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Adjuvant Chemo a Winner in Rare Brain Cancer
(MedPage Today) -- Significant survival bump in nondeleted anaplastic glioma (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - June 5, 2016 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Radiation therapy with pembrolizumab, bevacizumab safe for glioma patients
Researchers will present preliminary results from a phase 1 study testing whether the addition of pembrolizumab to radiation therapy and bevacizumab is safe and can control tumor growth for these patients. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Moffitt: Radiation therapy with pembrolizumab, bevacizumab safe for glioma patients
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute) Moffitt Cancer Center will present preliminary results from a phase 1 study testing whether the addition of pembrolizumab to radiation therapy and bevacizumab is safe and can control tumor growth for these patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Friday at ASCO: Glioma and Biosimilar TrastuzumabFriday at ASCO: Glioma and Biosimilar Trastuzumab
Among the news highlighted today is a study showing improved survival in patients with glioma and a biosimilar product for trastuzumab (Herceptin). Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Early results positive for treating high-grade gliomas with virus-based therapy
An investigational virus-based therapy was safely given to patients with high-grade or recurrent gliomas in a phase I study, improving survival for some, investigators report. <table... (Source: Clinical Neurology News)
Source: Clinical Neurology News - June 1, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Study in Rodents Investigates Link Between Cell Phone Radiation and Cancer
By Stacy SimonThe US National Toxicology Program (NTP) has released partial results of a large study it’s conducting in rats and mice to try to determine whether cell phone use causes cancer. Cell phones give off a low-energy type of radiation called radiofrequency (RF) radiation when they’re in use, and that has caused concern over whether or not cell phones can increase cancer risk. Studies done in the past that looked at groups of people have had conflicting results. Some – but not all – found possible links between cell phone use and some types of tumors, especially in the head.The part of the N...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - June 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer Risks/Causes Source Type: news

Scientists discover mechanism that turns mutant cells into aggressive cancers
Scientists have caught a cancer-causing mutation in the act. A new study shows how a gene mutation found in several human cancers, including leukemia, gliomas and melanoma, promotes the growth of aggressive tumors. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

TSRI scientists discover mechanism that turns mutant cells into aggressive cancers
(Scripps Research Institute) Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have caught a cancer-causing mutation in the act. A new study shows how a gene mutation found in several human cancers, including leukemia, gliomas and melanoma, promotes the growth of aggressive tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

[Research Article] The tumor microenvironment underlies acquired resistance to CSF-1R inhibition in gliomas
Macrophages accumulate with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) progression and can be targeted via inhibition of colony-stimulating factor–1 receptor (CSF-1R) to regress high-grade tumors in animal models of this cancer. However, whether and how resistance emerges in response to sustained CSF-1R blockade is unknown. We show that although overall survival is significantly prolonged, tumors recur in >50% of mice. Gliomas reestablish sensitivity to CSF-1R inhibition upon transplantation, indicating that resistance is tumor microenvironment–driven. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activity was elevated in recurre...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 20, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Daniela F. Quail Source Type: news

American College of Radiology Recognizes Gold Medalists
Washington, DC — The American College of Radiology (ACR) presented its highest honor, the 2016 Gold Medal, to Walter J. Curran Jr., MD, FACR; Lawrence P. Davis, MD, FACR; and Charles D. Williams, MD, FACR, during ACR 2016—The Crossroads of Radiology® in Washington, DC. This award acknowledges distinguished and extraordinary service to the College or to the discipline of radiology. “All three of the ACR honorees have provided visionary leadership and extraordinary service, which continue to advance high-quality patient care in the fields of radiology and radiation oncology,” said Bibb Allen Jr.,...
Source: American College of Radiology - May 16, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Dog genes give insight into human brain tumors
Dogs share more than just our homes - they also share similar cancers and genetics. Research into gliomas recently received a helping hand from our four-legged friends. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Could canine research offer clues to human brain cancer?
HealthDay News Research across 25 dog breeds has uncovered three genes thought to increase the risk of glioma brain tumors, which may help humans with the tumors. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study of glioma susceptibility in dogs may yield insights for humans
A new study of the genetic factors underlying glioma formation in dogs may hold clues to how these common and often untreatable tumors form in humans. The genome study, which was conducted across 25 dog breeds, identified three genes associated with the tumor. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Could Dog Research Offer Human Brain Cancer Clues?
Scientists identify three genes thought to raise risk for glioma tumors (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could Canine Research Offer Clues to Human Brain Cancer?
Scientists identify three genes thought to raise risk for glioma tumors (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - May 12, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Family Medicine, Oncology, Research, News, Source Type: news

Could Canine Research Offer Clues to Human Brain Cancer?
THURSDAY, May 12, 2016 -- Dogs may help scientists unleash the secrets to a malignant brain tumor in humans. Research across 25 dog breeds has uncovered three genes thought to increase the risk of glioma brain tumors. The findings may offer clues... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 12, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Study of glioma susceptibility in dogs may yield insights for humans
(PLOS) A new study of the genetic factors underlying glioma formation in dogs may hold clues to how these common and often untreatable tumors form in humans. The genome study, which was conducted across 25 dog breeds, identified three genes associated with the tumor. The results from this research, led by Katarina Truvé of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Kerstin Lindblad-Toh of Uppsala University, were published on May 12 in PLOS Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 12, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Experimental therapy halts treatment-resistant brain tumors in mouse model
Researchers report an experimental therapy that in laboratory tests stops aggressive, treatment-resistant and deadly brain cancers called glioblastoma and high-grade gliomas. Testing a multi-step therapeutic strategy, the scientists found a way to use a gene therapy to shut down a gene long-implicated in the formation of high-grade gliomas called Olig2. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Experimental therapy halts treatment-resistant brain tumors
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Researchers report in the journal Cancer Cell an experimental therapy that in laboratory tests stops aggressive, treatment-resistant and deadly brain cancers called glioblastoma and high-grade gliomas. A multi-institutional team led by researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center publishes their results on May 9. Testing a multi-step therapeutic strategy, the scientists found a way to use a gene therapy to shut down a gene long-implicated in the formation of high-grade gliomas called Olig2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 9, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news