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Screening for bipolar disorder: lessons not yet learned
When presenting for treatment, patients with bipolar disorder are more likely to experience symptoms of depression and anxiety than symptoms of mania or hypomania. Bipolar disorder is therefore prone to being overlooked because its diagnosis is more often based on retrospective report than cross-sectional assessment. Recommendations for improving the detection of bipolar disorder include the use of screening questionnaires. Most studies on the performance of bipolar disorder screening scales rely on structured diagnostic interviews to assess bipolar disorder, and few studies have been of psy...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Improving outcome of bipolar disorder when considering glucose metabolism
Patients with bipolar disorder have a three times increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with the general population.1 This is of clinical significance, because bipolar disorder complicated by T2D is associated with greater morbidity, and greater chronicity and disability.2 However, little is known about the impact of insulin resistance on course of illness. A cross-sectional study considered 121 participants affected by bipolar disorder type I or II, from the Mood Disorders Program at Dalhousie University and from the Maritime Bipolar Registry in the Atlantic Provinces of Canada. No excl...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Wisdom Of The Crowd
In this study, women had a much higher rate of depression than men (8.2% of women verses 4.8% of men); and younger adults report higher depressive episodes (9.3% of 18-25-year-olds versus 5.2% of those 50-years and older). There was also quite a difference in reported depression percentages between ethnic groups. The lowest reported was Asian at 4.2%, (Hispanic at 5.6%, White at 7.1%, Black at 5.4%, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander at 6.7% and American Indian/Alaska Native at 6%) with the highest, 12.7%, among those identifying with 2 or more ethnicities.[2] A major depressive episode was defined as "a period of tw...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Are SSRIs responsible for precipitating suicidal ideation in teenagers with 'subsyndromal' bipolar affective disorder who have been misdiagnosed with unipolar depression? - Hogg S, Ansari S, Masood Q, Agius M, Rihmer Z.
Concerns have recently been raised about a possible link between suicidal ideation and the use of SSRIs in teenagers diagnosed with unipolar depression, such that the USA FDA and UK CSM have issued warnings regarding the use of SSRIs in adolescents with de... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Women using hormonal contraception at higher depression risk
Raised risk of depression and first use of antidepressant, especially in adolescents Related items fromOnMedica Tell women IUD more effective for emergency contraception Oral contraceptive use not linked to major birth defects Lithium safe and effective in children with bipolar disorder Most antidepressants ineffective for children (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 29, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Important Health Stories You May Have Missed
There's never a shortage of health-related headlines. I don't envy the editors of The Week magazine, who have to sift through countless inane weight-loss stories as well as seemingly important new research to determine just the right fit for the magazine's "Health Scare of the Week" column. Like those editors, the public has the arduous responsibility of judiciously deciding what news stories to toss aside and what stories to accept as important. Last week's story said red wine will protect your heart, this week it's toxic, and next week your choice of wine or beer make determine whether you are alive or dead by age 55......
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

What 1989 And The Golden Girls Tell Us About Medicine Today
Today, 1989 may be most associated with Taylor Swift: It is the album that won her a second Grammy for Album of the Year. Not only that, it happens to be the year Swift was born--such a long, long time ago! People under 35 have no personal memory of 1980s pop culture, which is ironic since Swift's album in part pays homage to it. In the real 1989 (no offense to Swift and the 10 co-producers who made the album), all sorts of revolutions took place: Mr. Gorbachev tore down that pesky wall, for example. America's greatest antagonist, the Soviet Union, collapsed in 1989. Brazil conducted its first democratic presidential ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

What Does Bipolar Mania Look and Feel Like?
How to recognize the symptoms of bipolar mania. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients At Greater Risk for Same Diagnosis: Study
Brothers, sisters of those with bipolar disorder also face higher odds of similar diagnosis, Israeli research suggestsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Family History, Schizophrenia (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients at Greater Risk for Same Diagnosis: Study
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 -- People who have a brother or sister with schizophrenia are 10 times more likely to develop the mental illness, a new study out of Israel suggests. Researchers also found increased risks for bipolar disorder when a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 21, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients at Greater Risk for Same Diagnosis: Study
Brothers, sisters of those with bipolar disorder also face higher odds of similar diagnosis, Israeli research suggests (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - September 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Research, News, Source Type: news

Book Review: A Spectrum Approach to Mood Disorders
James Phelps’ new book, A Spectrum Approach to Mood Disorders: Not Fully Bipolar But Not Unipolar—Practical Management, is written for professionals, not laymen. I have some familiarity with bipolar disorder and its causes, symptoms, and treatments. However, I am not a professional and this book often goes beyond my ability to comprehend. Dr. Phelps has been treating patients and studying and writing about mood disorders for over 25 years, but he makes assumptions that the reader has a higher level of experience or training, and it makes this book difficult for amateurs to fully appreciate. The basic premise of...
Source: Psych Central - September 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dave Schultz Tags: Antidepressants Anxiety Attention Deficit Disorder Bipolar Book Reviews Borderline Personality Depression Disorders General Mood Stabilizers Postpartum Depression Professional Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology PT Source Type: news

A mother's utterly heart-rending account of her child's mental illness
After years of erratic behaviour interspersed with periods of severe depression, Jane and Peter ’s eldest daughter Jennifer, 32, has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study - Eberhard J, Weiller E.
PURPOSE: Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I) manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), criteria for "with mixed features" have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritabi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

EPO Improves Cognitive Performance in Severe Mental Illness EPO Improves Cognitive Performance in Severe Mental Illness
A performance-enhancing drug often used illegally in sport has been shown to improve cognitive performance in bipolar disorder and depression, new research shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

EPO may improve cognition for depression, bipolar disorder patients
Stephen FellerWASHINGTON, Sept. 19 (UPI) -- The hormone EPO, best known as a performance-enhancing drug among athletes, showed promise as a treatment for depression and bipolar disorder in a recent study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kids With Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol: Study
Title: Kids With Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 9/16/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/19/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - September 19, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Hormone EPO shown to improve brain sharpness in patients with depression and bipolar disorder
A study has found that EPO (erythropoietin) – best known as a performance-enhancing drug in sport – may improve cognitive functioning in patients suffering from bipolar disorder or depression. This raises hope for the first long-term treatment for this problem, which affects hundreds of millions of patients throughout the world. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kids with Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol
And those who also have conduct disorder seem to face an even greater risk Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Child Behavior Disorders, Dual Diagnosis, Teen Mental Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kids With Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol: Study
FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 -- For some teens with bipolar disorder, the risk that they will abuse alcohol and drugs may increase as they get older, a new study suggests. The research included 105 young people with bipolar disorder and 98 without the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 16, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

What You Should (And Shouldn't) Say To Someone Having A Panic Attack
This article originally appeared on YourTango. More from YourTango: How To Totally MASTER The Art Of Being Happy 12 BIG Signs You (Or Someone You Love) Has Bipolar Disorder I Refuse To Let My Wife's Depression Ruin My Marriage 11 Quotes That'll Yank You Out Of That Funk And Cheer Your A Up 35 Quotes That TOTALLY Capture Your Wacky But Wonderful Friendship -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Response to common schizophrenia, bipolar treatment dictated by gene type
A mood-stabilizing drug prescribed to many patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder may decrease negative symptoms for people with a certain variant of the COMT gene, say researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for September 13, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Orthofix launches study of pulsed electromagnetic fields in treating osteoarthritis Orthofix said today it enrolled the 1st patient in a study exploring the use of its Physio-Stim pulsed electromagnetic field system for treatin...
Source: Mass Device - September 13, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Suicidality in bipolar disorder: the role of emotion-triggered impulsivity - Johnson SL, Carver CS, Tharp JA.
A growing body of research suggests that impulsive responses to emotion more robustly predict suicidality than do other forms of impulsivity. This issue has not yet been examined within bipolar disorder, however. Participants diagnosed with bipolar I disor... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Ethicon wins FDA nod for Enseal X1 tissue sealer
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) subsidiary Ethicon  said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its Enseal X1 large jaw tissue sealer designed for vessel sealing and precise heat management. The Somerville, N.J.-based company said the newly cleared Enseal X1 is an advanced bipolar device designed for use in open procedures, such as colectomies and hysterectomies. “Ethicon remains committed to addressing the critical needs of patients, ensuring they have access to the most effective treatment through continued innovation and product enhancement. By providing access to leading-edge technology in advanced bipolar en...
Source: Mass Device - September 12, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Surgical Ethicon Source Type: news

Book Review: When Someone You Know Has Depression
Susan J. Noonan, MD, MPH, starts her new book, When Someone You Know has Depression: Words to Say and Things to Do, with a disturbing scenario: “I just don’t know what to do,” Melinda says. She reaches for her purse and takes out a tissue, dabbing carefully at corners of her eyes. We are sitting in the family room, an alcove barely larger than a closet just outside the psychiatric emergency room. She has come in tonight with her husband who, she has been explain to me, has been slipping farther and farther into a dark depression. “I came home today, and he was sitting at the dining room table with his gun next to h...
Source: Psych Central - September 10, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Megan Riddle Tags: Bipolar Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Cognitive-Behavioral Depression Disorders Family General Mindfulness Personal Stories Postpartum Depression Psychology Relationships & Love Self-Help Stress Suicide Treat Source Type: news

Postpartum psychosis big risk for mothers with bipolar disorder
Pregnant women with bipolar disorder and their families and physicians should be aware of a significantly higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis, according to a new review of literature on the disorder. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Postpartum psychosis big risk for mothers with bipolar disorder
(Northwestern University) Pregnant women with bipolar disorder and their families and physicians should be aware of a significantly higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis, according to a new Northwestern Medicine review of literature on the rare and under-researched disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Book Review: Ordinarily Well: The Case for Antidepressants
For those in the field of mental health, the debate about the efficacy of pharmaceutical medications has been an enduring and uncertain one, and this debate can sometimes end up complicating treatment, outcomes, and even attitudes toward what it means to be well. In his extraordinary new book, Ordinarily Well: The Case for Antidepressants, Peter D. Kramer delves into this debate, taking a rare and unbiased look at the question: Do antidepressants work? Kramer, the author of the widely popular Listening to Prozac, uses his impressive clarity and insight to study the science that has influenced antidepressants. The question ...
Source: Psych Central - September 6, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Clinical Trials Disorders General Medications Policy and Advocacy Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment Antidepressant Antipsychotic Bipolar Disorder books on antidepressant efficacy books on antidepressants books on Source Type: news

Artists With 'Invisible' Disabilities Use Tattoos To Talk About Health
“I have chosen a surreal art approach to represent my invisible disability, due to the surreal nature of mental illness,” tattoo artist Lindsay Carter expressed in a statement. Carter’s image ― featured on the right, above ― shows a bird whose head is a cage with a giant eyeball protruding from the dreamlike vision.  “As long as I’ve been consciously aware, I’ve been diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder,” she continued. “Severe episodes can happen for no apparent reason and at that point I cannot help nor snap out of the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

We Need To Change The Way We Talk About Mental Health
Our cultural lexicon can trend toward the dramatic. A really good TV show is going off the air? We’re “depressed.” A political candidate proposes a policy we disagree with? They’re “crazy.” We want to change our outfit for the third time in a day? We’re “bipolar.” But we shouldn’t use mental health-related phrases in ways that aren’t literal.  Using mental health terminology in a pejorative or trivializing manner can be damaging. As Dan Reidenberg, the executive director of the suicide awareness organization SAVE points out, it largely contributes ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Personality traits as an endophenotype in genetic studies on suicidality in bipolar disorder - Pawlak J, Dmitrzak-W ęglarz M, Maciukiewicz M, Kapelski P, Czerski P, Leszczyńska-Rodziewicz A, Zaremba D, Hauser J.
Introduction The influence of personality traits on suicidal behaviour risk has been well documented. Personality traits and suicidal behaviour are partially genetically determined and personality has been described as an endophenotype of suicidal behaviou... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Compelling Alternatives -- 'Outside Mental Health' -- To Mainstream Psychiatry
Alternatives to mainstream mental health are now being taken seriously by the mainstream media, as evidenced by the New York Times August 2016 article, "An Alternative Form of Mental Health Care Gains a Foothold." The recently published book Outside Mental Health: Voices and Visions of Madness (2016) provides both compelling alternatives and realistic hope for those who have been failed by mainstream mental health. It has become increasingly mainstream to criticize psychiatry for its corruption by drug companies, invalid diagnoses, lack of long-term treatment effectiveness, and other scientific failings. Outside Mental He...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Better evaluation of physical health services for people with severe mental illness is needed
Approaches to improve the integration of physical health services for people with severe mental illness are generally poorly described, and most evaluations are small in scale and poorly reported. Better descriptions and evaluations are needed to help identify and replicate best practice in the UK. About 1% of the UK population have severe mental illness, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or severe depression. They are often poorly served by the NHS in terms of their physical health, often due to fragmentation of services. This review set out to describe recent approaches, such as shared information systems, co-loca...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins and Salk co-lead $15M initiative to unravel bipolar disorder, schizophrenia
(Salk Institute) Partnership of government, academics and industry will develop new ways of studying and screening drugs for major psychiatric illnesses (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins and Salk co-lead $15m initiative to unravel bipolar disorder, schizophrenia
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies will co-lead a $15.4 million effort to develop new systems for quickly screening libraries of drugs for potential effectiveness against schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the National Institute of Mental Health has announced. The consortium, which includes four academic or nonprofit institutions and two industry partners, will be led by Hongjun Song of Johns Hopkins and Rusty Gage of Salk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bipolar adolescents continue to have elevated substance use disorder risk as young adults
A follow up to a previous study finding an association between adolescent bipolar disorder and the incidence of cigarette smoking and substance use disorder finds that risk was even greater five years later, particularly among those with persistent bipolar symptoms. The study also finds evidence that the presence of conduct disorder, in combination with bipolar disorder, may be the strongest influence on the risk of smoking and substance use disorder. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hillary Clinton's New Platform Is A Blow To Mental Health Stigma
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton released a wide-ranging mental health plan on Monday, saying that her office would support Americans living with mental health issues through better legislation. “The next generation must grow up knowing that mental health is a key component of overall health and there is no shame, stigma or barriers to seeking out care,” Clinton’s campaign stressed in an announcement. Of course, candidate platforms rarely remain intact if they actually become policy after election day, but Clinton’s focus on normalizing mental health treatment reflects growi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hillary Clinton's New Platform Is A Blow To Mental Health Stigma
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton released a wide-ranging mental health plan on Monday, saying that her office would support Americans living with mental health issues through better legislation. “The next generation must grow up knowing that mental health is a key component of overall health and there is no shame, stigma or barriers to seeking out care,” Clinton’s campaign stressed in an announcement. Of course, candidate platforms rarely remain intact if they actually become policy after election day, but Clinton’s focus on normalizing mental health treatment reflects growi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Book Review: Mom, Mania, & Me
Just how is a child cope when her mother goes off the handle in fits of rage, often leaving painful welts on her arms and legs, only to, days later, dress her up, buy her new clothes and take her to the theater? How is a young mother to cope when her mother regularly sends her three pages lists of her shortcomings? Questions such as these inspire Diane Dweller’s new book, Mom, Mania, and Me: Surviving and Changing a Volatile Relationship. Dweller begins her story in hiding. Often hiding under the kitchen table, ducking behind doors, or simply trying not to be seen, she describes living in constant fear of the one person ...
Source: Psych Central - August 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Bipolar Book Reviews Children and Teens Disorders Divorce Family General Grief and Loss Medications Memory and Perception Parenting Personal Stories Psychiatry Psychology Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Treatment being t Source Type: news

GP who blogged about her battle with bipolar disorder 'was found hanged'
Dr Wendy Potts, 46, from Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, had suffered manic episodes and suicide attempts before she was found hanged in her family home by her partner. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study shows high engagement with digital therapy for schizophrenia spectrum disorders
Pear Therapeutics, a Boston and San Francisco-based developer of digital strategies to address a broad range of mental health conditions, has released results of a study showing promising engagement with its program Thrive, which uses a smartphone app along with medication to treat patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 25, 2016 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

MRI scan may help diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, UCLA researchers report
UCLA doctors have found what may be an earlier and easier way to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a disorder that is thought to affect some former football players and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma. Using a new software tool for analyzing MRI scans, the researchers detected the shrinkage of several key brain regions in a former football player with cognitive problems. The same pattern of brain changes is commonly seen in CTE cases that have been confirmed by autopsies after a person’s death. While the findings from this single case report are preliminary, they raise the possibility th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 24, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Speculating About Candidate Health Is Mudslinging, Not Medicine
Hey everyone. How are you? Just checking in because this doozy of an election cycle is starting to show. We’re all a little punch drunk and some of us aren’t making much sense anymore.  Case in point? Dr. Drew Pinsky. The medical doctor and media personality went on KABC’s McIntyre in the Morning this week and made some unfounded statements about Hillary Clinton’s wellbeing, stating he was “gravely concerned” about the democratic nominee’s health and health care. Here’s the full clip: Pinsky is a board-certified internist. And his legitimate medical creden...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers Uncover Brain Region Associated With Generosity
A tiny chunk of brain may partly determine whether someone is generous or stingy, new research suggests. This particular brain region seems to makes some people quicker to learn empathy for others, the study found. “A specific part of the brain called the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex was the only part of the brain that was activated when [the person was] learning to help other people,” study co-author Patricia Lockwood, an experimental psychologist at the University of Oxford in England, said in a statement. “The subgenual anterior cingulate seems to be especially tuned to benefiting other people.&...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Well: Antipsychotics During Pregnancy Not Tied to Birth Defects
Drugs used to treat bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses were not linked to an increase in the risk for birth defects. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Birth Defects Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Mental Health and Disorders Pregnancy and Childbirth Family Featured Source Type: news

Mental Illness Affects Presidents, Too
Perhaps it isn’t surprising, given the intense rhetoric of this year’s presidential election, that politicians have started throwing around accusations of insanity.    In early August, California Rep. Karen Bass, a Democrat, launched the hashtag #DiagnoseTrump and started a change.org petition claiming the Republican nominee, Donald Trump, meets the diagnostic criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Not long after, Trump called Hillary Clinton “unstable,” and at a rally in New Hampshire said, “She’s got problems.” The candidates’ verbal volley highlights a p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Antipsychotic Meds Pose Little Danger to Fetus, Study Finds
Researchers report no significant rise in defects for babies exposed during first trimester Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Bipolar Disorder, Pregnancy and Medicines, Schizophrenia (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain study confirms gene mutation link to psychiatric disorders
Brain scans have revealed how a genetic mutation linked to major psychiatric disorders affects the structure, function and chemistry of the brain. The study offers further clues about how the mutation increases the risk of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Federal Register: Premarket Notification Submissions for Bipolar Electrosurgical Vessel Sealers for General Surgery; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability
The FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance ``Premarket Notification (510(k)) Submissions for Bipolar Electrosurgical Vessel Sealers for General Surgery.'' FDA has developed this guidance document to assist industry in preparing premarket no... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - August 15, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news