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Rookie Doctors Can Work Up To 24 Hours Straight Under New Rules
CHICAGO (AP) — Rookie doctors can work up to 24 hours straight under new work limits taking effect this summer — a move supporters say will enhance training and foes maintain will do just the opposite. A Chicago-based group that establishes work standards for U.S. medical school graduates has voted to eliminate a 16-hour cap for first-year residents. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education announced the move Friday as part of revisions that include reinstating the longer limit for rookies — the same maximum allowed for advanced residents. An 80-hour per week limit for residents at all levels remains ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Source Type: news

Tufts Surgeons Perform 2 Double Transplants On Same Day
BOSTON (CBS) – A rare combined series of transplants for two men on the same day, and thanks to the expertise at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, both patients are on the verge of going home. Both men needed heart and kidney transplants, and with those two organs, you can’t transplant one without the other. That’s because without a healthy heart the kidney transplant may fail and vice versa. But what makes this story so unusual is that the organs became available on the same day. So Tufts transplant teams had to go into overdrive. “I had no strength. I wasn’t able to do any of the things I u...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Watch Listen double transplant Mallika Marshall Tufts Medical Center Source Type: news

Fewer Heavy Americans Are Trying To Lose Weight, Study Finds
CHICAGO (AP) — Fewer overweight Americans have been trying to lose weight in recent years, and researchers wonder if fat acceptance could be among the reasons. The trend found in a new study occurred at the same time obesity rates climbed. “Socially accepted normal body weight is shifting toward heavier weight. As more people around us are getting heavier, we simply believe we are fine, and no need to do anything with it,” said lead author Dr. Jian Zhang, a public health researcher at Georgia Southern University. Another reason could be people abandoning efforts to drop pounds after repeated failed attempts, ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Obesity Source Type: news

Doctors Warn Against Teen Pot Use Amid Looser Marijuana Laws
CHICAGO (AP) — An influential doctors group is beefing up warnings about marijuana’s potential harms for teens amid increasingly lax laws and attitudes on pot use. Many parents use the drug and think it’s OK for their kids, but “we would rather not mess around with the developing brain,” said Dr. Seth Ammerman. The advice comes in a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics, published Monday in Pediatrics. The group opposes medical and recreational marijuana use for kids. It says emphasizing that message is important because most states have legalized medical use for adults, and many have...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Marijuana Source Type: news

Putting The Perk Caffeine Bracelet To The Test
BOSTON (CBS) – Many of us can’t get through the day without coffee. And Kate Merrill is WBZ-TV’s resident caffeine junkie. When she wakes up at 3 a.m. she pours herself a monster mug. After the morning newscast she heads out for a mid-morning coffee run with Chris McKinnon and Danielle Niles. And around noon time she gets a jolt of soda or even Red Bull. “I can’t go without caffeine,” said Merrill. So, we asked her to try Perk. The Perk caffeine bracelet. (WBZ-TV) It’s a new bracelet that uses a patch to deliver caffeine directly through the skin. The patch is the equivalent of one...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Consumer Health Local News Syndicated Local caffeine bracelet Dr. Mallika Marshall Perk Source Type: news

Specially Trained Dogs Sniff Out Cancer, Save Lives
BOSTON (CBS) – Chicago firefighter Jim O’Malley’s cancer was caught by a group of dogs. “At first I didn’t believe it at all,” he said. Since 2013, O’Malley and hundreds of his fellow Chicago firefighters have breathed into masks as part of a study. The breath samples are tested by dogs trained to sniff out cancer. A raised paw means a sample is positive. “I thought this is crazy,” he said. At 49, O’Malley didn’t believe what the dogs had discovered. Then he went to his doctor. “They said you have colon cancer. And it really took the wind out of my sails. I ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Cancer Dogs Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Local Researchers May Have Found Way To Restore Hearing
BOSTON (CBS) – Tiny hair cells inside our inner ear allow us to hear but they can be easily damaged by loud noises or certain drugs, causing hearing loss. And these hair cells don’t regenerate. Once they’re gone, they’re gone. But researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, MIT, and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary have found a way to grow new hair cells in mouse, primate, and human tissues using a cocktail of drugs, which could restore hearing. They hope to begin clinical trials in humans in about 18 months. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Hearing Loss Source Type: news

Life Expectancy In U.S. Expected To Remain Behind Other Countries
BOSTON (CBS) – When it comes to life expectancy, the United States will continue to trail other industrialized countries in the year 2030. Female babies born in South Korea in 2030 can expect to live to age 91. In France and Japan, the average life expectancy for women will be about 88 years. But female babies born in the U.S. in 2030 will only live an average of 83 years. Boy babies will live about 79 years. Both are only about two years more than the life expectancy now. What is behind the life expectancy gap? Experts blame lack of universal healthcare, healthcare disparities, more homicide, more obesity and highe...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Program Can Help Doctors, Patients Discuss Gun Safety
BOSTON (CBS/AP) — A program will provide guidance to Massachusetts doctors who want to discuss gun safety with their patients. Democratic Attorney General Maura Healey and the Massachusetts Medical Society announced a partnership Monday to create brochures and a voluntary online training program for doctors to help prevent gun-related accidents and violence. The material is being developed after physicians and other health care professionals complained about a lack of information available for discussions with patients about firearms safety. Healey said in a statement that most gun owners are responsible and safety-consc...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Heard On WBZ NewsRadio 1030 Local Doctors gun safety Massachusetts Patients Source Type: news

Research Underway In Boston To Help Dogs Live Longer
BOSTON (CBS) – With a bounce in her step and a healthy wag in her tail, only the white on her face begins to betray her age. “She’s a typical golden retriever, a real pleaser, happy to hear your voice, wants to be around all the time,” an instant smile comes to Beth McGoldrick’s face when she talks about her dog, Layla, who just turned 12. “She’s really been a fantastic dog. It was heartbreaking to see her go lame.” That was when Layla was just 6 years old. Beth did everything she could to get her faithful companion back on her feet. For Layla that now means routine acupunctu...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall MSPCA-Angell Rapamycin Source Type: news

Exercise May Not Be Completely Linked To Weight Loss, Study Finds
CBS Local – It’s possible that weight loss isn’t directly pushed by exercising, according to a study conducted by Loyola University of Chicago. Working out promotes good health across the board but not necessarily weight loss. Losing weight includes burning calories, but when the body burns more calories, the hungrier it gets leading those lost calories being replaced. Studies have also confirmed that notion as well as burning calories through exercise doesn’t make up the majority of your body’s calorie burning. “Our study results indicate that physical activity may not protect you from...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Exercise study finds Source Type: news

Iranian Scientist Unable To Begin Heart Research In Boston Due To Travel Ban
BOSTON (CBS) — As debates over President Donald Trump’s travel restrictions rage on, people affected by the ban who cannot get into the country worry for their future. With his name already on the door of his work space at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, PhD scientist and newly-accepted Harvard University fellow Seyed Soheil Saeedi Saravi should be starting his potentially groundbreaking research on heart disease in a few weeks. Iranian scientist Soheil Saravi. (WBZ-TV) But the Iranian immigrant’s dream of working in this science lab was abruptly halted after President Trump’s executive order ba...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Brigham and Women's Hospital Chantee Lans Donald Trump Harvard University Immigration Iranian scientist Soheil Saravi Travel Ban Source Type: news

Kids ’ Menu Is Just As Unhealthy As It Was 5 Years Ago, Study Finds
CAMBRIDGE (CBS) — The healthy eating trend has impacted many Americans’ diets in recent years, but there’s one crucial area that has remained largely unchanged: the kids’ menu. A study conducted by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that the Kids LiveWell program, launched to alter things like the kids menu, hasn’t changed much in restaurants. “Although some healthier options were available in select restaurants, there is no evidence that these voluntary pledges have had an industry-wide impact,” said Alyssa Moran, t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Source Type: news

Gonorrhea Outbreak Reported In New Hampshire
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Health officials say New Hampshire has reported a high number of gonorrhea cases for last year, at 465. The average in the past was about 130 cases per year, going back to 2007. Dr. Benjamin Chan, state epidemiologist, said Thursday that New Hampshire historically has had one of the lowest rates of the sexually transmitted disease in the country. He said health officials are working to identify people who may have been exposed to gonorrhea to connect them with testing and treatment. Gonorrhea most commonly infects the reproductive tract, including the cervix, uterus, and fallopian tubes in women, and...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News gonorrhea New Hampshire Source Type: news

Warren, Walsh Hold Rally For Obamacare At Faneuil Hall
BOSTON (CBS) — Led by Mayor Marty Walsh and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, hundreds packed Faneuil Hall’s Sam Adams Park Sunday afternoon to voice their support for Obamacare–and their disdain for President-elect Donald Trump’s plan to repeal and replace it. “The right to healthcare is human right, and in 2017, that right is being threatened,” Mayor Walsh said. Huge crowd gathered outside @FaneuilHall for rally hosted by @marty_walsh against @realDonaldTrump 's efforts to repeal #ACA. #wbz #wbznews pic.twitter.com/6D6OOpzj4L — Kim Tunnicliffe (@KimWBZ) January 15, 2017 Sen. Warren tol...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Heard On WBZ NewsRadio 1030 Local Syndicated Local Watch Listen Affordable Care Act Ed Markey Elizabeth Warren Faneuil Hall Marty Walsh Obamacare Paul Burton Source Type: news

Increased Activity In Part Of Brain Could Predict Stress-Related Heart Attack Risk
BOSTON (CBS) — Stress and heart attacks have long been linked, but researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital may now know exactly why. Published in the Journal Lancet, Mass General researchers found a link for the first time between the area in the brain that processes stress and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Doctor Ahmed Tawakol, a cardiologist at MGH and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School who took part in the study, said activity in the amygdala could provide answers. “We found that the amount of activity in that tissue of the brain actually very nicely predicted th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Heard On WBZ NewsRadio 1030 Local Syndicated Local Brain Heart Attack Massachusetts General Hospital Stress Source Type: news

CVS Now Selling Generic Competitor To EpiPen At A 6th Of The Price
WOONSOCKET, R.I. (AP) — CVS is now selling a rival, generic version of Mylan’s EpiPen at about a sixth of its price, just months after the maker of the life-saving allergy treatment was eviscerated before Congress because of its soaring cost to consumers. The drugstore chain says it will charge $109.99 for a two-pack of the authorized generic version of Adrenaclick, a lesser-known treatment compared to EpiPen, which can cost more than $600. EpiPen alternative (WBZ-TV) CVS Health Corp., the nation’s second-largest drugstore chain, says it cut the price of the generic version of Adrenaclick nearly in half. ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CVS EpiPen generic epipen Source Type: news

Rob Gronkowski Surprises Teen Battling Cancer With Video Message
BOSTON (CBS) – It was the best kind of surprise from Patriot star Rob Gronkowski to a teenager battling brain cancer. The message is personal and very inspiring for the 13-year-old who is from Lawrence, but now lives in North Carolina. It comes at the perfect time, as the young patient goes for his last chemotherapy treatment after a very long journey. “What’s up Hunter?  It’s your buddy Rob Gronkowski,” was the first thing in a video Gronkowski sent Hunter Pietrowski, another fighter with a ton of heart. “I just want to say congratulations on your last chemo session coming up on Thursday.&...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News NFL Patriots Sports Syndicated Local Syndicated Sports Paula Ebben Rob Gronkowski Source Type: news

Lawyers Trade Blame In Meningitis Outbreak Trial
BOSTON (AP) — The former president of a compounding pharmacy blamed for a deadly meningitis outbreak in 2012 put “profits over patients” and ignored repeated warning signs that drugs manufactured by his company were being contaminated by mold, a prosecutor told jurors Monday in a federal racketeering trial. Barry Cadden, the former head pharmacist at the now-closed New England Compounding Center in Framingham, is charged with causing the deaths of 25 people who died after getting injectable steroids, mainly for back pain, from their doctors. Compounding pharmacies mix customized medications for patients in th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Uncategorized Barry Cadden Meningitis outbreak NECC Source Type: news

Man Opts To Receive Liver From Donor With Hepatitis C After First Transplant Fails
BOSTON (CBS) – After his first transplant failed, 26-year old Ben Blake was in need of another liver and fast. So he made the courageous decision to take one that is infected with a treatable disease in order to save his life. “Ben is my only son and he was very sick at birth,” says Duane Blake. Ben, had biliary atresia, a rare disease that eventually causes liver failure. At just seven months of age, he needed a liver transplant. “Every day was really a blessing and a gift,” says Duane. But by the end of college, Ben’s donor liver began to fail and he started to waste away. He lost 40 pounds, could barel...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall Liver Transplant Source Type: news

Struggling To Hit The Gym? It May Not Be Your Fault, Study Suggests
BOSTON (CBS) – If you’ve already broken your New Year’s resolution to exercise more, it may not be entirely your fault. WBZ-TV’s Dr. Mallika Marshall reports there’s new research that shows a hormone released in the brain may affect a person’s motivation to get moving, especially if they’re overweight. A recent study looked at obese mice and found that the way their brains handled the feel-good hormone dopamine was altered and seemed to cause them to be less physically active. “In many cases, willpower is invoked as a way to modify behavior,” study author Alexxai Kravitz said in Cell Metabolism. &...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Diet Res-Illusions: Tips From The Pros On How To Lose Weight
ITHACA, N.Y. (AP) — We make ’em, we break ’em. New Year’s diet resolutions fall like needles on Christmas trees as January goes on. Genes can work against us. Metabolism, too. But a food behavior researcher has tested a bunch of little ways to tip the scale toward success. His advice: Put it on autopilot. Make small changes in the kitchen, at the grocery store and in restaurants to help you make good choices without thinking. “As much as we all want to believe that we’re master and commander of all our food decisions, that’s just not true for most of us,” said the researcher,...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Diet Source Type: news

WRITERS Program Helps Hospitalized Children Stay Busy
BOSTON (CBS) — Kids who have to spend long days at the hospital can get bored easily, but the WRITERS program at Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center is making all the difference for one local boy. 12-year-old Sam Galette of Dorchester has sickle cell disease, a blood disorder that causes recurrent episodes of pain, but Sam has had a particularly hard road. “Sam has been pretty sick,” says Dr. Cathy Rosenfield, a pediatric hematologist and oncologist at Floating Hospital and Sam’s doctor.  “Sam had several strokes this summer and had a head bleed.” The strokes have left Sam weak on o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center Source Type: news

Lawmakers Delay Key Provisions Of New Massachusetts Pot Law
BOSTON (AP) — The Massachusetts Legislature approved a six-month delay of several key provisions in the state’s new recreational marijuana law, including the licensing of pot shops, angering backers of the voter-approved measure. The House and Senate passed the bill without a public hearing and without debate during lightly attended, informal sessions in both chambers Wednesday. The ballot initiative that allows adults 21 and over to possess and use limited amounts of recreational marijuana and grow as many as a dozen pot plants in their homes was approved by 53.7 percent of voters on Nov. 8 and took effect on Dec....
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Marijuana Massachusetts Pot Source Type: news

Skin Cancer Drop In Northeast Bucks Rising Rates Elsewhere
CHICAGO (AP) — A decline in melanoma cases and deaths in Northeast states bucks a national trend for the deadliest skin cancer and may reflect benefits of strong prevention programs, a study suggests. In the years included in the study, the Melanoma Foundation of New England became more active with programs to prevent skin cancer, the researchers noted. Two years ago, the group started a program that funds sunscreen dispensers in public places and recreation spots in Boston and other New England cities. That effort expanded this year to other states. “Such programs may enhance public awareness about skin cancer and...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Skin Cancer Source Type: news

Harpist Touches Hundreds Of Lives At Brigham & Women ’ s Hospital
BOSTON (CBS) – Five days a week Nancy Kleiman plays her harp at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. It’s her job as part of the hospital’s Caring and Healing Modalities. “I’ll go down to radiation oncology, go up to the NICU,” she says. It’s a soothing, peaceful sound. And she meets people, like the Sullivans from Portland, Maine. Last spring 21-year-old Patrick Sullivan was at the Brigham in tough shape with a form of cancer called lymphoma. “You could kind of watch the disease travel through my body,” he says. Four months of chemotherapy knocked it down, but not ou...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Brigham & Women's Hospital Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

New Recommendations On How Long Ear Infections Should Be Treated
BOSTON (CBS) – Ear infections are incredibly common among young kids and many get them multiple times a year, but for how long do they need to be treated? In children under 2, ear infections are usually treated with oral antibiotics for 10 days. But antibiotics can cause an upset stomach and rashes and there’s always the concern for antibiotic resistance, so doctors wanted to see if kids would do just as well with 5 days of treatment instead of 10. The answer is probably “no”. In a recent study they found that children less than 2 years of age treated with only 5 days of antibiotic therapy were more likely ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Ear Infections Source Type: news

Millions To Give Up Alcohol For ‘ Dry January ’
BOSTON (CBS) – It’s that time of year to start thinking of your New Year’s resolutions, like losing weight and quitting smoking. Well what about drinking? This year millions of people will be participating in what’s being called “Dry January” a campaign spearheaded by a British group called Alcohol Concern. The goal is to detox, lose weight, and save money by giving up alcohol for 31 days. It’s not clear if this will improve the health of most participants but some people who have done it before say they slept better, lost weight, and had more energy. It also encouraged them to reduce th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Alcohol Dr. Mallika Marshall Dry January Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Physical Activity Could Help Concussion Recovery
BOSTON (CBS) – When a child gets a concussion, he’s usually told to take it easy at home until their symptoms resolve. But a new study in JAMA suggests that physical activity early after a concussion may actually help children recover faster. In fact, the kids that returned to physical activity within 7 days of their injury were less likely to have ongoing concussion symptoms a month later compared to kids who remained inactive. A new report says that most states are easily caught off guard by a new contagious disease. Twenty-six states and Washington D.C. had low scores but not Massachusetts. The Bay State scored ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Syndicated Local Concussion Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

‘ Wendy ’ s Welcome ’ Eases Children ’ s Hospital Fears
SHARON (CBS) — Going to the Emergency Room can be scary, especially for children. But one local girl is making a trip to the ER a lot less intimidating for kids and their parents. You wouldn’t know it to look at her but 12-year-old Wendy Wooden of Sharon has been a very sick girl. At the age of three, she developed an E. coli infection, which damaged multiple organs and she required a kidney transplant. Wendy spent hundreds of days at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). So when a neighbor’s children needed to be admitted, she turned to Wendy and her mom with lots of questions. What should she bring? Wh...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Syndicated Local Children Dr. Mallika Marshall Hospital Source Type: news

Older Patients With Female Doctors Are Less Likely To Die, Harvard Study Finds
CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – Want to live longer? Having a woman for a doctor instead of a man may help. A new Harvard University study reveals that older patients are less likely to die or end up back in the hospital if they have female doctors. The study looked at more than 1 million patients over the age of 65 who were hospitalized for common conditions including pneumonia, stroke and heart attack. Researchers say women physicians are more likely to practice evidence-based medicine and stick with clinical guidelines. “The difference in mortality rates surprised us,” said lead study author Yusuke Tsugawa. “The gender of the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Harvard University Source Type: news

US Women Increasingly Using Pot During Pregnancy, Study Finds
CHICAGO (AP) — U.S. women are increasingly using marijuana during pregnancy, sometimes to treat morning sickness, new reports suggest. Though the actual numbers are small, the trend raises concerns because of evidence linking the drug with low birth weights and other problems. In 2014, almost 4 percent of pregnant women said they’d recently used marijuana, up from 2.4 percent in 2002, according to an analysis of annual drug use surveys. Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, said the results raise concerns and urged doctors and other health care providers to avoid recommending the drug f...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Marijuana Pot Pregnancy Source Type: news

Study Finds Social Media Detrimental To Self Body Image
CBS Local – Social media has changed the modern world, for better or worse. Many of us are enamored with the platforms, especially young people, but it could have a damaging effect on our sense of self. According to a study conducted by the University of New South Wales, Australia, social media platforms are detrimental to our sense of body image. When we are constantly smacked with models whose pictures are heavily edited, we portray ourselves in a negative light in comparison. Other research by the same university found that women rarely compare themselves to magazines or billboards these days, only seldom for te...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Tech Trending Body Image Social Media study finds Source Type: news

Pokemon Go Doesn ’ t Impact Exercise Habits, Harvard Study Finds
CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – When Pokemon Go debuted over the summer, there were plenty of headlines declaring that the augmented reality game was helping young people get outside and exercise. But a new study from researchers at Harvard University is casting doubt on how much catching Pokemon in the real world actually does to improve a player’s physical activity. An article published in the medical journal The BMJ states that Pokemon Go users did indeed report a “moderate” increase in their number of daily steps after installing the game. But that uptick was no longer observed after six weeks, according to the study. (Photo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Harvard University Pokemon Go Source Type: news

Scalp Cooling Device Could Prevent Hair Loss In Chemotherapy Patients
BOSTON (CBS) — Hair loss is one of the most difficult side effects from chemotherapy, but a scalp-cooling device could make a difference. It’s a two-layered cap with a circulating refrigerated fluid on the inside and an insulating layer on the outside. A patient wears it before, during and after chemotherapy and researchers found 50 percent of women undergoing chemo for breast cancer who used the device kept their hair. This device could help cancer patients keep their hair. (WBZ-TV) The theory is the cooling reduces blood flow to the scalp, limiting the amount of chemo that can reach the hair follicles and cau...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Breast Cancer Health Local News Syndicated Local Chemotherapy Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Pets Can Play A Big Role In Mental Health Treatment
BOSTON (CBS) — Pets might play a more important role in mental health than previously thought. Researchers interviewed people with serious mental disorders including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and discovered a significant number considered their pets to be as vital to their social network as close family members and social workers. Pets could help mental health treatment. (WBZ-TV) The patients said pets helped distract them from disturbing thoughts, like suicide, and gave them a sense of order, responsibility, security and provided unconditional acceptance and support. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Second-Hand Marijuana Smoke Warning
BOSTON (CBS) – You’ve heard of the harms of second-hand tobacco smoke but what about second-hand marijuana? Researchers just published the first study to show that when kids are around marijuana users, not only do they inhale harmful smoke but their bodies also take up the psychoactive chemicals that produce the “high” from marijuana. This is a good reminder to parents to avoid using marijuana around minors. Over-The-Counter Hearing Aids Good news if you or a loved one has hearing loss.The FDA is taking steps to allow hearing aids to be sold over-the-counter, and two senators, including Elizabeth W...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Harvard Study Shows Positive Thinking Can Prolong Your Life
This study only looked at women, but Dr. Kim says based on other studies these findings can probably be applied to men as well. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Cancer Dr. Mallika Marshall Harvard University Source Type: news

Men Are More At Risk Of Overeating During Holidays, Study Finds
BOSTON (CBS) – Eating the most at the holiday table is a classic Power-Dad move. When everyone else quits on their second plate, there’s always that one person who grabs a third dish and it’s usually a man. A study conducted by the Cornell Food and Brand Lab has found that men are at risk at overeating, simply because of their ego. “Even if men aren’t thinking about it, eating more than a friend tends to be understood as a demonstration of virility and strength,” said co-author Kevin Kniffin, PhD, via News Medical. This might be the quintessential study that explains men. The experim...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Fall Winter Guide Health News Food Holidays study finds Source Type: news

Study: Snacking On Nuts Can Reduce Risk Of Heart Disease, Cancer
LONDON (CBS) – If you’re looking for a healthy snack, nuts might be the answer. A new study from European researchers in the journal BMC Medicine says eating a handful of nuts a day can cut down on several health risks. Data from more than 800,000 people who ate all kinds of nuts, including hazelnuts, walnuts and peanuts, shows they cut their risk of dying from heart disease by nearly 30 percent and cancer by 15 percent. The risk of premature death was also 22 percent lower for people who ate nuts. “It’s quite a substantial effect for such a small amount of food,” study co-author Dagfinn Aune said. Even though so...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Nuts Source Type: news

Nearly 2 Million Pounds Of Recalled Ready-To-Eat Chicken May Be Undercooked
WASHINGTON (CBS) – The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced a recall for about 2 million pounds of ready-to-eat chicken because it may be undercooked. Officials say bacterial pathogens may have survived in the recalled National Steak and Poultry chicken products. The affected chicken was produced between Aug. 20 and Nov. 30, with establishment number “P-6010T” printed in the USDA mark of inspection. Some five-pound bags of the recalled chicken was sold under the Hormel brand name. Click For Full List Of Recalled Products Last month, a food service customer complained that the chicken appeared to be underc...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Consumer Health News Recall Source Type: news

Warning For Dog Owners: Canine Distemper Spreads In New Hampshire
CONCORD, N.H. (CBS) – Dog owners are being warned about a deadly virus that’s been found in southern New Hampshire and the Upper Connecticut River Valley. The New Hampshire Fish & Game Department says multiple dead gray foxes in the area have displayed symptoms of canine distemper. The disease is often fatal to animals once infected; it cannot be passed to humans. There is a feline distemper virus that affects cats, but it is unrelated to canine distemper. Officials say canine distemper is spread when animals interact with each other. It can be found in foxes, coyotes, skunks, raccoons, mink weasel, fisher and ott...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local canine distemper New Hampshire Source Type: news

Globe: Braintree Father Builds Drug Company To Battle Son ’ s Cancer
BOSTON (CBS) – A Braintree father whose son was battling neuroblastoma, an especially dangerous form of childhood cancer, teamed with a doctor and some high-powered help to create a drug company dedicated to saving the lives of children. In 2004, Pat and Dina Lacey’s six-month-old baby Will was discovered to have a tumor the size of a baseball in his chest. When Will relapsed at the age of two, the Laceys were told to focus on his quality of life. “Quality of life means how do you want your child to die?” Pat Lacey said in an interview with The Boston Globe. But the Laceys were not going to give up hope. T...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Boston Globe Cancer Paula Ebben Will Lacey Source Type: news

‘ Magic Mushrooms ’ Psychedelic Drug May Ease Anxiety, Depression
NEW YORK (AP) — The psychedelic drug in “magic mushrooms” can quickly and effectively help treat anxiety and depression in cancer patients, an effect that may last for months, two small studies show. It worked for Dinah Bazer, who endured a terrifying hallucination that rid her of the fear that her ovarian cancer would return. And for Estalyn Walcoff, who says the drug experience led her to begin a comforting spiritual journey. ‘VERY IMPRESSIVE RESULTS’ The work released Thursday is preliminary and experts say more definitive research must be done on the effects of the substance, called psilocybin...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Magic Mushrooms Psilocybin Mushrooms Source Type: news

White Wine Linked To Increased Melanoma Risk In New Study
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (CBS) – A new study has some concerning findings for white wine drinkers. Researchers at Brown University say that drinking white wine is associated with a higher risk of melanoma, the most dangerous type of skin cancer. The study published in a journal of the American Association For Cancer Research looked at the drinking habits of more than 210,000 participants, and resulted in bad news for those who enjoy a glass of white wine. “Each drink per day of white wine was associated with a 13 percent increased risk of melanoma,” the study says. Click here for more on the study Meanwhile, red wine, beer a...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Alcohol Melanoma Wine Source Type: news

Poor Time Management Skills? Blame Your Parents, Study Suggests
ALBANY, N.Y. (CBS) – If you have trouble completing your tasks on time, you may be able to blame your parents for that. There’s a new study from the University of Albany that found people who had consistent daily routines growing up were less likely to have problems with attention and time management than those with erratic schedules as children. Researchers think regular routines help kids feel safe and have clearer expectations and boundaries. The study surveyed nearly 300 undergraduate students. Study leader Jennifer Weil Malatras, a psychologist, writes that even families experiencing major structural changes can s...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Dr. Mallika Marshall Study time management Source Type: news

11-Year-Old Girl Saves Newborn Sister From Choking
STOUGHTON (CBS) – Eleven year old Alise Fabregas of Stoughton was glad her sixth grade class learned about CPR and choking situations but she never thought she’d put it to use so soon. One week ago, her mother gave birth to Miranda. And two days later, little Miranda started choking on her formula. “She had been spitting up, so I heard her about to spit up, and then all of sudden she just, it wasn’t coming out, it was so scary,” said mother Jamie Fabregas. Alise Fabregas (WBZ-TV) That’s when Alise’s classroom training kicked in. “I told mom to turn her around at an angle and pat her on the ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Alise Fabregas Bill Shields Stoughton Source Type: news

Penguin Robot Provides Help For Children With Autism
BOSTON (CBS) — Children with autism benefit from comprehensive services but those services often come with a hefty price tag.  A local couple has now developed a robot which could one day make services much more affordable and much more accessible.  Dr. Mallika Marshall introduces us to PABI. 8-year old Raphael Rocha has autism but until recently, his family couldn’t afford the services he needed. “It’s heart-breaking,” says Raphael’s mother, Fernanda Rocha. Laurie Dickstein-Fischer, PhD is a professor at Salem State University and a former school counselor.  She says many families find services...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Autism PABI penguin robot Source Type: news

Girl With Rare Disorder Leaves Boston Hospital In Time For Thanksgiving
BOSTON (CBS) — It was a giant step in the right direction for a 10-year-old from East Boston with an extremely rare disease. The little girl has endured months of grueling physical therapy after a virus triggered illness, paralyzing her legs. Even though she still has a hard road ahead, she’s going home for Thanksgiving. Paulina Lopez is one tough kid, leaving Franciscan Children’s in Boston after a long two months. “She basically had her nervous system attacked. She had suffered something called Acute Flaccid Myelitis, after getting a common virus called enterovirus,” says Dr. David Leslie,...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen East Boston Franciscan Children's Lisa Hughes Source Type: news

Another Failure In Search For Treatment To Slow Alzheimer ’ s
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An experimental treatment for Alzheimer’s failed again in a widely anticipated study, disappointing many who had hoped Eli Lilly had finally found a way to slow the progression of the mind-robbing disease. The drug did not work better than a placebo treatment in a study of 2,100 people with mild Alzheimer’s, the company announced Wednesday. “We’re incredibly saddened by the news,” said Maria Carrillo, chief science officer of the Alzheimer’s Association, who was not involved in Lilly’s research. “There was a lot of hope for this avenue, this approach....
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Alzheimer's Disease Solanezumab Source Type: news