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Poor outlook for biodiversity in Antarctica
The popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world has been brought into question in a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Law of physics explains natural drivers of wealth inequality
A engineering professor has proposed an explanation for why the income disparity in America between the rich and poor continues to grow. According to the constructal law of physics, income inequality naturally grows along with the economy. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Man with quadriplegia employs injury bridging technologies to move again -- just by thinking
A subject who was paralyzed below his shoulders in a bicycling accident, is believed to be the first person with quadriplegia in the world to have arm and hand movements restored with the help of two temporarily implanted technologies. A brain-computer interface with recording electrodes under his skull, and a functional electrical stimulation (FES) system activating his arm and hand, reconnect his brain to paralyzed muscles. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizes
Changes in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Tiny bacterium provides window into whole ecosystems
Research on Prochlorococcus, the most abundant life form in the oceans, shows the bacteria ' s metabolism evolved in a way that may have helped trigger the rise of other organisms, to form a more complex marine ecosystem with overall greater biomass. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Elevating women ' s status lowers dependence on solid fuels
A new research paper finds that in countries where gender inequalities are most pronounced, women are much more likely to be exposed to solid fuel -- including burning from wood, crop wastes, charcoal, and dung -- and its negative consequences. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Elevated blood pressure not a high mortality risk for elderly with weak grip
A study of nearly 7,500 Americans age 65 or older suggests that elevated blood pressure is not related to high mortality risk among people in that age group with weak grip strength. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fairy circles of Namibia: New research helps scientists gain insight
New insights have been gained into one of nature ' s great mysteries: the fairy circles of Namibia. Numbering in the millions, the so-called fairy circles are in the eastern, interior margin of the coastal Namib Desert, stretching from southern Angola to northern South Africa. They range in size from about 12 feet to about 114 feet, consisting of bare patches of soil surrounded by rings of grass. The origins of the circles have long been debated by researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sun: Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling
Recent images have revealed the emergence of small-scale magnetic fields in the lower reaches of the corona researchers say may be linked to the onset of a main flare. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

How a young-looking lunar volcano hides its true age
A young-looking volcanic caldera on the Moon has been interpreted by some as evidence of relatively recent lunar volcanic activity, but new research suggests it ' s not so young after all. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Alcohol use in veterans with schizophrenia less common than thought; no level safe
US veterans who are being treated for schizophrenia are much less likely to drink any alcohol than the general population. But when they do misuse alcohol, it leads to worsening of their symptoms. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New method to ' fingerprint ' HIV developed
A method to analyze the glycan shield on HIV ' s protective outer glycoprotein has been developed as a potential HIV vaccine candidate, report scientists. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fighting world hunger: Robotics aid in the study of corn and drought tolerance
Developing drought tolerant corn that makes efficient use of available water will be vital to sustain the estimated 9 billion global population by 2050. In March 2014, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded the University of Missouri a $20 million grant as part of a multi-institutional consortium to study how corn maintains root growth during drought conditions. Using funding from the NSF, engineers on a multidisciplinary team have developed a robotic system that is changing the way scientists study crops and plant composition. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Evolving ' lovesick ' organisms found survival in sex
Being ' lovesick ' takes on a whole new meaning in a new theory which answers the unsolved fundamental question: why do we have sex? (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Potential drugs and targets for brain repair
Researchers have discovered drugs that activate signaling pathways leading to specific adult brain cell types from stem cells in the mouse brain, according to a new study. The results may open new avenues for drug development aimed at treatment of degenerative brain disorders. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Unraveling the functional diversity of longevity gene SIRT1
While the search for elixir of life has captivated human imagination for millennia, researchers around the world have put in efforts to extend healthy lifespan and reduce the burden of morbid diseases in an increasingly aging population. Researchers have now identified a control mechanism within a longevity gene, which is key to unraveling its functional diversity and is likely to boost efforts at designing specific pharmacological agents. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lead exposure in childhood linked to lower IQ, lower status jobs, as adults
A long-term study of 565 children who grew up in the era of leaded gasoline has shown that their exposure to the powerful neurotoxin may have led to a loss of intelligence and occupational standing by the time they reached age 38. Ninety-four percent of the children exceeded today ' s reference value of 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood. For each 5-microgram increase in blood lead, a person lost about 1.5 IQ points. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Marathon running may cause short-term kidney injury
The physical stress of running a marathon can cause short-term kidney injury, according to new research. Although kidneys of the examined runners fully recovered within two days post-marathon, the study raises questions concerning potential long-term impacts of this strenuous activity at a time when marathons are increasing in popularity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

How bacteria hunt other bacteria
A bacterial species that hunts other bacteria has attracted interest as a potential antibiotic, but exactly how this predator tracks down its prey has not been clear. A new study reveals that the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus homes in on its target by taking advantage of fluid forces generated by its own swimming movements and those of its prey. These bring the bacteria in close proximity, giving BV a greater chance of successful attack. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Malaria parasites ' walk through walls ' to infect humans
Researchers have identified proteins that enable deadly malaria parasites to ' walk through cell walls ' -- a superpower that was revealed using the Institute ' s first insectary to grow human malaria parasites. The research has identified two parasite proteins that are the key to this superpower. The proteins could be targeted to develop much-needed antimalarial drugs or vaccines. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vitamin D, calcium supplementation among older women does not significantly reduce risk of cancer, study finds
Among healthy postmenopausal women, supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium compared with placebo did not result in a significantly lower risk of cancer after four years, according to a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vitamin D, calcium supplementation among older women does not significantly reduce risk of cancer
Among healthy postmenopausal women, supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium compared with placebo did not result in a significantly lower risk of cancer after four years, according to a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Celiac disease: Not enough evidence for screening
The current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons, the US Preventive Services Task Force has concluded. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Less invasive hysterectomy for early-stage endometrial cancer finds clinical support
Researchers found similar rates of disease-free survival and no difference in overall survival among women who received a laparoscopic or abdominal total hysterectomy for stage I endometrial cancer, according to a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Therapies that target dementia in early stages critical to success
Targeting dementia in the earlier stages of the condition could be critical for the success of future therapies, say researchers who have found that the very earliest symptoms of dementia might be due to abnormal stability in brain cell connections rather than the death of brain tissue, which comes after. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Highway to health: New findings point way to more nutritious crops
Researchers have had the closest look yet at the inner workings of a plant ' s circulatory system. Their findings show how nutrients get from the leaves, where they are produced through photosynthesis, to ' sinks ' that can include the fruits and seeds we eat and the branches we process for biofuels. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Can intergenerational cooperation defeat climate change?
Older adults are powerful allies in addressing climate change, say researchers. Research shows that older adults are at risk for the effects of extreme weather events and climate change; but they are also a potential resource for climate action. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A seismic mapping milestone
Using advanced modeling and simulation, seismic data generated by earthquakes, and one of the world ' s fastest supercomputers, a team of scientists is creating a detailed 3-D picture of Earth ' s interior. Currently, the team is focused on imaging the entire globe from the surface to the core-mantle boundary, a depth of 1,800 miles. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New method heats up ultrasonic approach to treating tumors
High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a breakthrough therapeutic technique used to treat tumors. The principle of this noninvasive, targeted treatment is much like that of focusing sunlight through a lens, using an ultrasonic transducer like a convex lens to concentrate ultrasound into a small focal region. Researchers have now designed a transducer for potential application in HIFU that can generate a steady, standing-wave field with a subwavelength-scale focal region and extremely high ultrasound intensity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Broad support exists for larger warnings on cigarette packs
A new study has found broad support, even among smokers, for increasing the size of health warnings on cigarette packs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rescuing 11 Asian Elephants from a mud hole
The rescue of 11 Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) from a mud hole inside the Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary, Mondulkiri Province, Cambodia, on 24th March 2017 avoided a tragedy for wildlife conservation in Cambodia. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Female menstrual cycle in a dish
A miniature female reproductive tract that fits in the palm of your hand has now been developed by researchers. It could eventually change the future of research and treatment of diseases in women ’s reproductive organs.This new 3-D technology — called EVATAR — is made with human tissue and will enable scientists to conduct much-needed testing of new drugs for safety and effectiveness on the female reproductive system. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Discovery of a new regulatory protein provides new tool for stem cell engineering
Bioengineers have discovered a protein that regulates the switch of embryonic stem cells from the least developed ' na ïve ' state to the more developed ' primed ' state. This discovery sheds light on stem cell development at a molecular level. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Brain stimulation improves schizophrenia-like cognitive problems
A new study finds that stimulating the cerebellum in rats with schizophrenia-like thinking problems normalizes brain activity in the frontal cortex and corrects the rats ' ability to estimate the passage of time -- a cognitive deficit that is characteristic in people with schizophrenia. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hair spacing keeps honeybees clean during pollination
A honeybee can carry up to 30 percent of its body weight in pollen because of the strategic spacing of its nearly three million hairs. The gap between each eye hair is approximately the same size as a grain of dandelion pollen, which is typically collected by bees. This keeps the pollen suspended above the eye and allows the forelegs to comb through and collect the particles. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cornering endangered species
Geographic areas occupied by certain species shrink as they decline in abundance, leaving them more vulnerable to extinction by harvest, concludes new research. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Watching the passage of knotted DNA slip through nanopores
How can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of biological systems? Scientists used computer simulations to investigate the options available to the genetic material in such situations. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A molecular on/off switch for CRISPR
Scientists now reveal how viruses disable bacterial immune systems. For many bacteria, one line of defense against viral infection is a sophisticated RNA-guided " immune system " called CRISPR-Cas. At the center of this system is a surveillance complex that recognizes viral DNA and triggers its destruction. However, viruses can strike back and disable this surveillance complex using " anti-CRISPR " proteins, though no one has figured out exactly how these anti-CRISPRs work -- until now. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Desktop scanners can be hijacked to perpetrate cyberattacks
The researchers conducted several demonstrations to transmit a message into computers connected to a flatbed scanner. Using direct laser light sources up to a half-mile (900 meters) away, as well as on a drone outside their office building, the researchers successfully sent a message to trigger malware through the scanner. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Prostate screening often occurs without discussion of benefits, risks
Less than a third of men in a large national survey reported talking with their doctor about both the pros and cons of the PSA blood test for prostate cancer, and the likelihood has decreased further since a national panel recommended against the test. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Toward glow-in-the-dark tumors: New fluorescent probe could light up cancer
A fluorescent probe lights up the enzyme beta-galactosidase in a cell culture. The glowing probe-enzyme combination could make tumors fluoresce, allowing surgeons to cut away cancer while leaving healthy tissue intact. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Insurance coverage for IVF increases chance of having baby
Women who pursue in vitro fertilization (IVF) to become pregnant are more likely to give birth if they have health insurance that covers the procedure, according to new research. The key reason is financial rather than medical: For many people, the high cost for one IVF procedure prohibits women from seeking a second treatment if the first attempt fails. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Does Vitamin D decrease risk of cancer?
In a new study, women who were given vitamin D3 and calcium supplements had 30% lower risk of cancer than women taking placebos. The difference did not quite reach statistical significance. However, in further analyses, blood levels of vitamin D were significantly lower in women who developed cancer during the study than in those who remained healthy. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vitamin D decreases risk of cancer, new study suggests
Low vitamin D status may increase the risk of cancer, suggests new research. The study is a randomized clinical trial of the effects of vitamin D supplementation on all types of cancer combined. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Understanding predictability, randomness by digging in the dirt
When tilling soil, the blade of the tool cuts through dirt, loosening it in preparation for seeding. The dirt granules are pushed aside in a way that looks random -- but might not be. Now, researchers have found a way to distinguish whether such a process is truly random, or is actually deterministic -- which can lead to deeper understanding and the ability to control the process. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Heated pavement technology tested at Des moines International Airport
Engineers are testing heated pavement technologies at the Des Moines International Airport. They ' ve installed two test slabs of electrically conductive concrete. And the pavement has effectively cleared ice and snow. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Physics can predict wealth inequality
The 2016 election year highlighted the growing problem of wealth inequality and finding ways to help the people who are falling behind. This human urge of compassion isn ’t new, but the big question that remains to be addressed is why inequality is so difficult to erase. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Abuse accelerates puberty in children
While it has long been known that maltreatment can affect a child ' s psychological development, new research indicates that the stress of abuse can impact the physical growth and maturation of adolescents as well. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Forests fight global warming in ways more important than previously understood
Trees impact climate by regulating the exchange of water and energy between Earth ' s surface and the atmosphere, an important influence that should be considered as policymakers contemplate efforts to conserve forested land, said the authors of an international study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Parents who play Pok émon GO with kids: ' It wasn ' t really about the Pok émon '
In the first study to survey and interview parents who play ' Pok émon GO ' with their children, families report a number of side benefits, including increased exercise, more time spent outdoors and opportunities for family bonding. However, some guilt about screen time persisted. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news