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Total 764858 results found since Jan 2013.

Why Meal Kits Aren ’t as Bad for the Environment as You Think
This study really motivates the need to carefully consider the food that we’re purchasing, and how we’re using the food that we buy.” Meal kits have a few sustainability benefits beyond reducing food waste, the researchers say. It is environmentally more friendly for a delivery truck, which is filled with other packages and driving an optimized route, to deliver food to consumers’ doorsteps, rather than having each person make an independent trip to the grocery store, Heard says. The cooling packs included with meal kits are also easier on the environment than refrigeration used in retail stores, th...
Source: TIME: Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Only one St. Louis-area hospital named to 'great hospitals' list
Only one St. Louis-area hospital made the latest list of the best hospitals in the U.S. On Friday, Becker’s Hospital Review, a monthly publication that focuses on health care news, and industry trends, released its annual 100 Great Hospitals in America list, with Barnes-Jewish Hospital being the only St. Louis facility to make the cut. The list recognizes hospitals for “excelle nce in clinical care, patient outcomes, and staff and physician satisfaction,” according to the website. The Becker’s…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Immediate Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy Does Not Delay Adjuvant Therapy Immediate Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy Does Not Delay Adjuvant Therapy
Immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer does not delay initiation of adjuvant therapy, according to results from the iBRA-2 study.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

"Seabins" in Australia working around the clock to filter ocean trash
Recent research shows plastic pollution in our oceans is affecting every continent on our planet. Nearly 18 billion pounds of plastic ends up in our oceans every year. By 2050, researchers estimate there could be more plastic in oceans by weight than fish, unless something changes. As part of our Earth Matters coverage, Scott Tweedie of Network 10 station in Australia traveled to Bondi Beach to show us how one company is trying to make a difference.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

North Carolina May Finally Let Women Revoke Consent During Sex
For years, legislators have declined to close a harmful loophole in state sexual assault laws, but advocates say 2019 could be the year that no means no in North Carolina.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Janet Burns, Women at Forbes Source Type: news

Parkinson's disease patient: 'I can walk... it's really helped me'
Parkinson's disease patient Gail Jardine can walk more freely after having a spinal implant fitted.
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parkinson's results beyond researchers' wildest dreams
Previously housebound patients are now able to walk more freely as a result of electrical stimulation to their spines. Researchers say the small trial of the treatment has gone 'beyond their wildest dreams'.
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When Pigs Fly
by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D. Researchers at Yale University recently reported an experiment in which they used an experimental chemical solution to create electrical activity in the cells of pig brains, brains obtained from a slaughterhouse four hours after the death of the animals from decapitation (NY Times ‘Partly Alive’: Scientists Revive Cells in Brains From Dead Pigs, 4/17,19).  These results led to all manner of comments in this story, many from bioethicists and in stories elsewhere.  Commentators suggested that the pigs’ brains were somehow made partly alive, that concerns about consciousness recurring in the de...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Arthur Caplan Tags: Animal Ethics Clinical Trials & Studies End of Life Care Featured Posts Organ Transplant & Donation Research Ethics Science Source Type: blogs

Forbes Ranks Albert Einstein College of Medicine Among the Nation ’s Best Midsize Employers
April 22, 2019—(BRONX, NY)—Albert Einstein College of Medicine has been recognized by Forbes asone of the country’s best midsize employers in 2019.
Source: Einstein News - April 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Comments from Richard Besser, MD, on the U.S. FDA Compliance Policy Regarding Flavored Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems and Flavored Cigars
RWJF submitted comments to the FDA, in supports of the decision to revise its compliance policy to reduce youth access to flavored ENDS and cigars.
Source: RWJF - News Releases - April 22, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Tags: Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Source Type: news

New York outbreaks drive US measles count up to 626
New York outbreaks continue to drive US measles cases up toward levels not seen in 25 years
Source: ABC News: Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Mechanisms of allopatric speciation in an Antillean damselfly genus (Odonata, Zygoptera): vicariance or long-distance dispersal?
Publication date: Available online 21 April 2019Source: Molecular Phylogenetics and EvolutionAuthor(s): Yusdiel Torres-Cambas, Sónia Ferreira, Adolfo Cordero-Rivera, M. Olalla Lorenzo-CarballaAbstractWe have examined divergence times of the Antillean damselfly genus Hypolestes, to elucidate which mechanism of allopatric speciation, vicariance or long-distance dispersal, could better explain the currently observed disjunct distributions of this genus. Samples of the three extant species of the genus, Hypolestes clara (Jamaica), H. hatuey (Hispaniola) and H. trinitatis (Cuba), were collected. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA g...
Source: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution - April 22, 2019 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research

Measles nears record in U.S. as cases continue to soar
This is the second-greatest number of cases in a single year since the disease was eliminated in the United States in 2000
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Physicians Are Still Late Adopters, But Have Warmed Up Considerably To Telehealth
A new study from an industry vendor suggests that physicians are considerably more likely to adopt and use telehealth tools than they were in the past. This doesn’t mean an explosion in the use of telehealth among medical practices anytime soon, as I’ll explain below, but these are still some stats worth considering. The survey, […]
Source: EMR and HIPAA - April 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Anne Zieger Tags: Ambulatory Clinical Healthcare IT Telemedicine and Remote Monitoring American Well Medical Practice Telehealth MGMA Physician Telehealth Stat News Source Type: blogs

Value-Based Care Programs On The Rise Across US, But Still Experimental For Many States
I can’t tell you how many times I’ve laden stories about value-based care with phrases like “if it ever comes” or “when the market is actually ready.” I’ve never been much of a capitation fan, and many of the VBC schemes I’ve reviewed look like capitation in new clothes, so maybe I’ve been engaging in […]
Source: EMR and HIPAA - April 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Anne Zieger Tags: Administration Ambulatory EMR-EHR Healthcare IT Revenue Cycle Management Accountable Care Organization ACO Change Healthcare Patient Centered Medical Home PCMH Value Based Care Value-Based Payment Source Type: blogs

Can AI Help Doctors Treat Depression? These Startups Think So
To tackle depression and anxiety, startups are coming out with a range of AI-based tools designed to help psychiatrists and family doctors optimize care sooner.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Yaron Carni, Contributor Source Type: news

Redox raises $33M in Series C Funding Led by Battery Ventures to Revolutionize How Healthcare Data Is Exchanged
Redox, the company that is changing the way healthcare providers and software vendors share data, today announced that the company closed a $33 million Series C funding round led by global investment firm Battery Ventures with participation from existing investors .406 Ventures, RRE Ventures, and Intermountain Ventures. As part of the transaction, Battery General Partner Chelsea Stoner, an […]
Source: EMR and HIPAA - April 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Healthcare IT News Tags: Health IT Company Healthcare IT IT Dev Ops AdventHealth Atrium Health Battery Ventures Brigham & Women’s Clarify Health Cleveland Clinic FItBit Geisinger Health IT Funding Health IT Investment Healthcare Interoperability Heal Source Type: blogs

Using their immunity, Ebola survivors play special role in Congo outbreak
Dozens of survivors are providing care — and much-needed human contact — to some of the littlest victims of the second-worst Ebola epidemic on record.
Source: CBC | Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

For teens living with cancer, keeping life as ‘normal’ as possible
With a new center dedicated to teenage patients, Yale New Haven Children ’s Hospital is working to make the battle against cancer an easier one for young adults.
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What It Takes to Be a Mental Health Advocate: An Interview With Christina Huff
Christina Huff At one point Christina Huff was living her dream: thriving as a paralegal in Chicago and newly in love. Five years and one divorce later, she’s still piecing together the debris – living with bipolar disorder and accepting a different kind of life. She has translated her passion for law to mental health advocacy, helping others rise from difficulty with gracefulness and determination, and is a beautiful model of turning pain into service. Living with bipolar, anxiety, eating disorders, and chronic pain, she beautifully weaves bits of her life and advice from other warriors on her site, Bipolar Hot Mess, ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Bipolar Interview Mental Health and Wellness Peer Support Source Type: blogs

Systematic variation of preparation time, temperature, and pressure in hydrothermal synthesis of macro-/mesoporous TiO2 for photocatalytic air treatment
Publication date: Available online 21 April 2019Source: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: ChemistryAuthor(s): Alireza Haghighat Mamaghani, Fariborz Haghighat, Chang-Seo LeeAbstractA series of porous TiO2 photocatalysts are prepared, by systematically varying the preparation conditions (time, temperature, or pressure (i.e. filling ratio)), characterized, and evaluated in photocatalytic oxidation of toluene and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) to explore preparation-property-performance relationships. A detailed characterization has been conducted via X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, scanning electron ...
Source: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry - April 22, 2019 Category: Chemistry Source Type: research

Flower-like magnetized photocatalysts accelerating an emerging pollutant removal under indoor visible light and related phenomena
This study presents the first evidence for FeOx intra-gap states on Bi2WO6- magnetized materials enhancing the Norfloxacin (NFX) degradation with respect to Bi2WO6 within acceptable times under indoor visible light (< 5 mW/cm2). The kinetically faster photocatalyst Bi2WO6-FeOx contained magnetite (Fe3O4). This material lead to NFX removal within one hour and was able to degrade NFX showing a stable performance over many cycles. Evidence for the Bi2WO6-FeOx photocatalyst behaving predomonantly as a semiconductor is described in this study. Evaluation of the magnetic field effect due to the FeOx intra-gap states and th...
Source: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry - April 22, 2019 Category: Chemistry Source Type: research

Baeyer–Villiger oxidation of cyclohexanone catalyzed by cordierite honeycomb washcoated with Mg–Sn–W composite oxides
Publication date: March 2019Source: Chinese Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Yang Han, Shengnan Li, Rong Ding, Wenjin Xu, Guangxu ZhangAbstractIn this work, a series of Mg–Sn–W oxide powder catalysts with different tungsten oxide contents (0, 15 wt% and 30 wt%) were prepared and washcoated on cordierite honeycomb monoliths to produce monolithic catalysts, which were tested for the Baeyer–Villiger oxidation of cyclohexanone. The obtained monolithic catalysts, which combined the advantages of both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, showed high catalytic efficiency and overcame the...
Source: Chinese Journal of Chemical Engineering - April 22, 2019 Category: Chemistry Source Type: research

Spider's Orange Colors Both Lure Prey and Frighten Predators
Spotted coin spider colors are a Swiss army knife of deception, bringing food closer, and keeping assailants at bay.
Source: The Scientist - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

UnitedHealth CEO's pay passed $18 million in 2018; Optum chief got $21 million in his first year
UnitedHealth Group Inc. CEO David Wichmann was paid $18.1 million in 2018, a slight increase from his pay the year before. Andrew Witty, who was named CEO of UnitedHealth's Optum unit in March 2018, was paid $21.2 million in 2018. The Minnetonka-based insurer disclosed Wichmann and Witty's pay in a proxy statement filed late Friday. Wichmann's pay in 2018 was 316 times greater than that of UnitedHealth's median employee, according to the filing. Wichmann's 2018 pay was a roughly 4 percent increase…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Alex Wittenberg Source Type: news

New guidelines likely to identify more children with high blood pressure
By widening guidelines on treatment for high blood pressure in children, researchers say they can better predict who is more likely to develop heart disease -- and to help them prevent it.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Caring for Herself Lets Her Better Care for Others
When the demands of being a physician took their toll on her health, Shani Muhammad, M.D., took steps to improve her own fitness and alter the way she practices medicine.
Source: AAFP News - April 22, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Three Researchers Ousted from MD Anderson
The center had received letters from NIH about researchers' violations of granting agency policies and intellectual property theft in 2018.
Source: The Scientist - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Seychelles: UNCT Family Retreated in Seychelles Over One Week Activities
[WHO] The UNCT Family Retreat, held at the Savoy Hotel in the idyllic island of Seychelles, spread over one week, with the participation of delegates from diverse UN Organisations and Government Officials uniting for the first time to achieve as 'Delivering as One'.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 22, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

USDA Scientists Must Say Published Research Is & ldquo;Preliminary & rdquo;
A memo distributed to employees of the US Department of Agriculture requires them to include a disclaimer that their peer-reviewed work doesn’t represent agency findings or policy.
Source: The Scientist - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

USDA Scientists Must Say Published Research Is “Preliminary”
A memo distributed to employees of the US Department of Agriculture requires them to include a disclaimer that their peer-reviewed work doesn ’t represent agency findings or policy.
Source: The Scientist - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Prenatal Sequencing for Some Autism Genes May Soon Be Available
Two studies, taken together, imply that sequencing can identify a genetic cause for ultrasound abnormalities in roughly 10 percent of cases.
Source: The Scientist - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

How The Bidens Earned More Than $3 Million While They Were In The White House
The Bidens made over $3 million while Joe Biden served as vice president.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Michela Tindera, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Why swim goggles might help astronauts' eyesight
Lower gravity of space reduces pressure in the eye but goggles and exercise might help
Source: CBC | Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

'We are still obsessed by this idea of abstinence': A critical analysis of UK news media representations of proposals to introduce drug consumption rooms in Glasgow, UK - Atkinson AM, McAuley A, Trayner KMA, Sumnall HR.
BACKGROUND: Drug consumptions rooms (DCRs) are a well-established and evidence-based harm reduction response to drug use. Recently, a consortium led by health services in Glasgow, United Kingdom (UK), proposed piloting a DCR. In this article, we examine ho...
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Non-radiation occupational hazards and health issues faced by radiologists - a cross-sectional study of indian radiologists - Kawthalkar AS, Sequeira RA, Arya S, Baheti AD.
CONTEXT: Radiologists as a group face unique occupational health hazards among which musculoskeletal injuries, chronic eye strain, and others are yet to receive adequate attention. Constant mental strain due to demanding turnaround times and work pressures...
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Kenya: Traditional Foods Secret for Good Health, Granny, 120, Says
[Nation] Turning 120 years was no small feat for Cianjoka Mucunku, who brought the usually quiet Kirege village in Tharaka-Nithi County to life with a colourful birthday celebration.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 22, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: Acute Hunger - Outrage As IDP Children Feed On Onion Leaves
[Vanguard] Intense hunger due to inadequate food items in an Internally Displaced Persons, IDP, camp in the outskirts of Bauchi State, has forced children to feed on onion leaves for survival.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 22, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Medical Marijuana Use Rising Among Cancer Patients
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - April 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Pharmacy, Dependence, News, Source Type: news

How to Make Your Workplace a Healthier One
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - April 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatry, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Priority Review Vouchers Have Helped To Improve Access To Drugs Targeting Neglected Diseases
Criticism of the Priority Review Voucher (PRV) program has been directed at the lack of requirements for a developed drug to be novel, and to be made affordable. A growing number of novel treatments with post-marketing access plans in place appear to be addressing critics ' concerns.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Joshua Cohen, Contributor Source Type: news

Congo-Kinshasa: WHO Ebola Responder Killed in Attack on the Butembo Hospital
[WHO] Today, Dr Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung, an epidemiologist deployed by WHO in the response to the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) was killed in an attack on Butembo University Hospital. Two other persons were injured in the attack but are believed to be in a stable condition.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 22, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

"Everybody living in India is a smoker" due to pollution, but there's some hope
In India, nearly 1.8 million people die every year as a result of dirty air. In Delhi, with 19 million people, 1,000 more cars hit the road every day, contributing to smog that's dangerous in many ways. But the real cost of the pollution is its toll on human health. Elizabeth Palmer reports from New Delhi as part of our Earth Matters coverage.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AI Startup Zebra Medical Vision Enlists Deep Learning To Save Lives
Zebra Medical Vision is helping doctors make the right decisions by developing deep learning algorithms for interpretation of medical images, working with data and research partners to train the algorithms and validate their efficacy, and integrating with the workflow of practicing radiologists.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Gil Press, Contributor Source Type: news

Two-thirds of practice managers feel STF allocations have not boosted general practice, report finds
Two-thirds of practice managers said sustainability and transformation fund (STF) allocations had brought‘no improvement’ to general practice, a report has revealed. ThePrimary Concerns 2018: The State of Primary Care report, published last month (27 March), surveyed the readers of Cogora’s five primary care publications: Management in Practice, Healthcare Leader, Nursing in Practice, Pulse and The Pharmacist.Hide related content:  Show related contentread more
Source: Management in Practice - April 22, 2019 Category: Practice Management Authors: costanzapearce Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Latest News Source Type: news

Humana: ‘Unhealthy Days’ For Seniors Drop As Social Determinants Screened
Humana said Medicare Advantage enrollees in cities where they are screened for social determinants of health have seen a 2.7% reduction in their unhealthy days since 2015.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Source Type: news

India's pollution makes everyone "a smoker" - but there's hope
In a country where nearly 1.8 million people die every year from breathing the air, politicians and entrepreneurs are trying to go green
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Every liberal city in America is headed toward Venezuela... get out while you can
(Natural News) Liberal cities across America are collapsing into Third World status. It’s not just the fact that San Francisco’s streets are now littered with drug needles and human feces, either. Seattle is also collapsing into rampant homelessness and drug addiction, creating an entire class of impoverished, homeless residents who are breeding grounds for HIV...
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Approves Marketing of First Device to Treat ADHD
MONDAY, April 22, 2019 -- Marketing has been approved for the first medical device to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Friday. The Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news