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High fibre diet 'could prevent type 1 diabetes'
Animal trials hint that short-chain fatty acids produced by a fibre-rich diet could protect against early-onset diabetesScientists have raised hope for the prevention of early-onset diabetes in children after a fibre-rich diet was found to protect animals from the disease.More than 20 million people worldwide are affected by juvenile, or type 1, diabetes, which takes hold when the immune system turns on the body and destroys pancreatic cells that make the hormone insulin.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Diabetes Medical research Science Society Nutrition Asthma Irritable bowel syndrome Digestive disorders Source Type: news

Weaponise! ​The meaning of 2017’s political buzzword
Sex, the NHS, Brexit, loose tal ​k – all have been ​described as ​‘weaponised’​. But what is the effect on the public when ​language is constantly on a war footing?In our embattled age, it seems everything can be turned into a weapon. The Scottish Tory leader, Ruth Davidson, has frequently accused Nicola Sturgeon of “weaponising Brexit” to break up the union. Donald Trump ’s “loose talk about Muslims”,the Washington Post reported, was “weaponised” in the courtroom battles over his travel ban. The Greenham Common protesters, Suzanne Moore wrote in this newspaper the other day,“weaponised trad...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Steven Poole Tags: Language Science Source Type: news

Fruit foraging in primates may be key to large brain evolution
Findings support view that big brains have evolved from diet rather than long-held theory it is due to social interactionForaging for fruit may have driven the evolution of large brains in primates, according to research attempting to unpick the mystery of our cerebral heftiness.The finding appears to be a blow to a long-held theory that humans and other primates evolved big brains largely as a result ofsocial pressures, with extra brain power needed to navigate and engage in complex social interactions. Instead the researchers say it supports the view that the evolution of larger brains is driven by diet.Continue reading....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Evolution Primatology Fruit Biology Science UK news Source Type: news

Are Devon ’s road-wrecking badgers a match for the German cows who blew up a barn?
Badger tunnels under a road in Braunton have been blamed for a road collapsing. They ’ve got some work to do before they belong in this rogue’s gallery of chaos-causing creaturesWe are destroying their homes and their kin so it was, perhaps, only a matter of time before the animals started fighting back. Until evolution gives them opposable thumbs, they have to use whatever nature has equipped them with. In the case of badgers, this means digging. Perhaps sickened by the numbers killed on Britain ’s roads (an estimated 50,000 badgers are hit by vehicles every year), badgers have tunnelled under a road in Braunton, no...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Emine Saner Tags: Animal behaviour Biology Science Source Type: news

Is a J ägerbomb more dangerous than a gin and tonic?
Research seems to link energy drink cocktails with higher alcohol consumption and an increase in negative consequences. How bad can a vodka Red Bull be?The majority of research suggests that people who drink alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) consume higher quantities of alcohol than non-AmED drinkers. This is then associated with an increase in behaviours with potentially very serious negative consequences, such as drink driving and unplanned unprotected sex.The general assumption behind this link is that energy drinks might mask the intoxicating and impairing effects of alcohol. It ’s very easy to say we would nev...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Abi Rose Tags: Alcohol Science Health Society Source Type: news

Bad language: why being bilingual makes swearing easier
Bilingual reduced emotional resonance is fairly well-established, but why does it happen? And does that have a knock-on effect for different communities?My dad had a liberal philosophy of childrearing, but he would always tell us off for swearing. As a result, I grew up feeling very uncomfortable using swearwords. Or, at least, so I thought – when I first moved to Scotland, I noticed that it was actually very easy to swear in English. Interestingly enough, I also found it easy to talk to my flatmates about topics that felt too intimate to discuss in my native tongue. In a flat of seven girls from all over Europe, we disc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wilhelmiina Toivo Tags: Language Science Psychology Source Type: news

Climate change: ‘human fingerprint’ found on global extreme weather
Global warming makes temperature patterns that cause heatwaves, droughts and floods across Europe, north America and Asia more likely, scientists findThe fingerprint of human-caused climate change has been found on heatwaves, droughts and floods across the world, according to scientists.The discovery indicates that the impacts of global warming are already being felt by society and adds further urgency to the need to cut carbon emissions. A key factor isthe fast-melting Arctic, which is nowstrongly linked to extreme weather across Europe, Asia and north America.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Tags: Climate change Natural disasters and extreme weather Drought World news Environment Science UK news Flooding Storm Desmond Arctic Source Type: news

Can you solve it? Take the Ada Lovelace challenge
We ’ve channelled the spirit of the mathematician, writer and daughter of Byron in order to set a riddle for Guardian readersHello guzzlers,I have a special treat for you today: a letter from the nineteenth century mathematician, Countess Ada Lovelace. The letter comes through the medium ofPavel Curtis, who every month for the last few years has been releasing similar puzzles from Ada that he callsAdalogical AEnigmas. Pavel, who has a day job as a software architect at Microsoft, is alegend in the puzzle community. He composed - I mean channelled - today ’s puzzle for Guardian readers. Enjoy!Continue reading... (Source...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Science Ada Lovelace Source Type: news

The 100 best nonfiction books: No 60 – On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin (1859)
Darwin ’s revolutionary, humane and highly readable introduction to his theory of evolution is arguably the most important book of the Victorian eraWhen Charles Darwin first sawOn the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life in book form, he is said to have remarked that he found it tough going. Actually, the book, composed in a hurry to forestall his rivals, after 20 years of research, and aimed at that mythical beast “the educated general reader”, is extraordinarily accessible, sometimes even moving, in its lucid simplicity. That’s all the mor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robert McCrum Tags: Science and nature Books Culture Charles Darwin Evolution Biology Source Type: news

The April night sky
Jupiter rules the sky, but also watch out for comet 41P/Tuttle –Giacobini–Kresák and for the Lyrids meteor showerJupiter comes to opposition in April and now rules our night sky. Also at its best is Mercury, while comet 41P/Tuttle –Giacobini–Kresák appears as an inflated greenish hazy blob as it sweeps between the Plough and Polaris – ourprevious Starwatch carried details and a chart.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alan Pickup Tags: Astronomy Jupiter Comets Meteors Mercury Mars Venus Saturn Science Space Source Type: news

Australian stargazers invited to join hunt for mysterious Planet 9
‘It really is Where’s Wally,’ says Australian National University’s Brad Tucker, but the twist is you get a say in the official name of anything you findEveryday stargazers will have a shot at naming a new planet by joining Australian astronomers in the hunt for a mysterious large orb believed to be circling the fringe of the solar system.Australian National University researchers have invited the public to join them in the hunt for so called “Planet 9” by combing through a massive array of new pictures mapping the southern sky.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Joshua Robertson Tags: Space Science Australian universities Australia news World news Source Type: news

Hopping rockets and flying washing machines in Google's wacky race to moon
Five competitors remain in a $20m Google contest to land a probe on the lunar surface by the end of the year, but all their craft are untested, rudimentary, or look like R2-D2By the end of the year, space engineers hope to fulfil one of their greatest dreams. They plan to land a privately funded probe on the moon and send a small robot craft trundling over the lunar surface. If they succeed they will open up the exploitation of the moon for mining and ultimately human colonisation – and earn $20m prize money as winners of the Google LunarXPrize.Out of the 29 companies that originally entered the competition, only five re...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, science editor Tags: The moon Space Google World news Science Technology Source Type: news

What does your profile picture say about you? - Quiz | Ben Ambridge
How often you change your photo says a lot about your personalityAre your Facebook and Twitter profile pictures giving away more than you think? To find out, answer the two questions below:1. How often do you change your profile picture on Facebook? (a) Once a year or less, (b) several times a year, or (c) at least once a month?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ben Ambridge Tags: Facebook Twitter Social networking Life and style Psychology Science Source Type: news

Hopping rockets and flying washing machines in wacky race to moon
Five competitors remain in a $20m Google contest to land a probe on the lunar surface by the end of the year, but all their craft are untested, rudimentary, or look like R2-D2By the end of the year, space engineers hope to fulfil one of their greatest dreams. They plan to land a privately funded probe on the moon and send a small robot craft trundling over the lunar surface. If they succeed they will open up the exploitation of the moon for mining and ultimately human colonisation – and earn $20m prize money as winners of the Google LunarXPrize.Out of the 29 companies that originally entered the competition, only five re...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, science editor Tags: The moon Space Google World news Science Technology Source Type: news

‘Who knows what we’ll find next?’ Journey to the heart of Mozambique’s hidden forest
Since it was identified on Google Earth in 2005, the forest of Mount Mabu has amazed scientists with its unique wildlife. Jeffrey Barbee joins explorer Professor Julian Bayliss on the first trip to its green heartThe soggy boots of the team slide backwards in the black mud as they struggle up towards the ridge line separating the forest edge from one of the last unexplored places on Earth.The rain is an incessant barrage of watery bullets firing down through the tree canopy. Thunder crashes. Tangles of vines and spider webs make for a Hollywood movie scene of truly impenetrable jungle.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Barbee Tags: Mozambique Conservation Biodiversity Wildlife Africa World news Environment Science Endangered habitats Endangered species Animals Source Type: news

'We've left junk everywhere': why space pollution could be humanity's next big problem
With satellites under threat from collisions, a former lieutenant is now focused on technology that can remove space debrisJason Held rekindled his love for space while lying in a ditch in Bosnia in 1996, where he was one of 16,500 US troops deployed on a peacekeeping mission at the end of the Bosnian War.Then a lieutenant, he says he had “nothing to do but to watch the two armies put their guns away”. So he signed up for a class in undergraduate biology through an army education program, taking the books to the ditch and passing the hours by studying.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Space Australia news Satellites Nasa Science Source Type: news

‘Your animal life is over. Machine life has begun.’ The road to immortality
In California, radical scientists and billionaire backers think the technology to extend life – by uploading minds to exist separately from the body – is only a few years awayHere ’s what happens. You are lying on an operating table, fully conscious, but rendered otherwise insensible, otherwise incapable of movement. A humanoid machine appears at your side, bowing to its task with ceremonial formality. With a brisk sequence of motions, the machine removes a large panel of b one from the rear of your cranium, before carefully laying its fingers, fine and delicate as a spider’s legs, on the viscid surface of your bra...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mark O'Connell Tags: Science Technology Human biology Computing Ageing Evolution Synthetic biology Genetics Source Type: news

Stem cells help some men with erectile dysfunction after prostate surgery
In clinical trials, eight out of 15 men suffering from erectile dysfunction had sex six months after one-time treatmentMen unable to have an erection afterprostate surgery enjoyed normal intercourse thanks to stem cell therapy, scientists are to report on Saturday at a medical conference in London.In first-phase clinical trials, eight out of 15 continent men suffering from erectile dysfunction had sex six months after the one-time treatment, without recourse to drugs or penile implants.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Stem cells Health Medical research Science Source Type: news

Who do you think you are – and how bad could you be?
Given the right (or wrong) situation, each of us might become anyoneWhat turns good people bad? The road to depravity and corruption, we tend to assume, is a slippery slope: a few small immoral acts, then things snowball, and before you know it, the floodgates have opened. (To clarify, this slippery slope is near a hydroelectric power plant, hence the floodgates. Also, it ’s snowing.)But according toa recent Dutch study, a more appropriate metaphor might be stepping off a cliff. Participants were invited to roleplay a business negotiation, and got various options for bribing a public official: gradually, with variou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Burkeman Tags: Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Life and style Source Type: news

From gravity to the Higgs we're still waiting for new physics
Annual physics jamboree Rencontres de Moriond has a history of revealing exciting results from colliders, and this year new theories and evidence aboundI ’m here again at the Rencontres de Moriond conference in Italy. Some of you might remember anupdate from last year from the same conference on a signal in data taken during 2015 at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), hinting at a new particle that weighed as much as 750 protons and decayed into two particles of light. This signal wasn ’t present in fresh data last year, so it was dismissed - we suppose that it was just a chance fluctuation. This conference has a history ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ben Allanach Tags: Physics Science Particle physics Cern Large Hadron Collider Gravity Higgs boson Source Type: news

Lab notes: is tartan T. rex about to enter the textbooks?
The potential for amassive shakeup of the dinosaur family tree (including a possible common ancestor from Scotland) was mooted this week – will a new classification come in and overturn over a century of evolutionary assumptions? Stay tuned, dino-lovers. In the meanwhile, I may have to reverse my personal policy on our eight-legged friends with the news that and ingredient infunnel web spider venom can protect cells from being destroyed by a stroke. Alongside this is the news that a new test can predict age when Alzheimer ’s disease will appear. It’s based on 31 genetic markers could be used to calculate any individu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

Your best pictures of newly recognised cloud formations
Meteorologists have consulted the International Cloud Atlas since the 19th century –now, updated with crowd-sourced images and newly categorised formations such as wave-like asperitas, it ’s going online.Readers have been sharing their images via GuardianWitnessContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian readers and Matthew Holmes Tags: Science Weather UK news Environment Source Type: news

US scientists launch world's biggest solar geoengineering study
Research programme will send aerosol injections into the earth ’s upper atmosphere to study the risks and benefits of a future solar tech-fix for climate changeUS scientists are set to send aerosol injections 20km up into the earth ’s stratosphere in the world’s biggest solar geoengineering programme to date, to study the potential of a future tech-fix for global warming.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Arthur Neslen Tags: Geoengineering Climate change Environment Science World news US news Source Type: news

Can we trust the Rorschach test? – podcast
To its critics, it is dangerous pseudoscience. To its supporters, it offers unique insights. What is the future of this controversial psychological test?Read the text versionContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Written by Damion Searls, read by Alice Arnold and produced by Simon Barnard Tags: Psychology Mental health Science Source Type: news

Pigs' teeth and hippo poo: behind the scenes at London zoo
The Zoological Society of London zoo is home to more than 650 animal species. PhotographerLinda Nylind was given exclusive access to spend time with the keepers and find out more about their daily routinesLondon zoo was established in 1828 and is the world ’s oldest scientific zoo. Created as a collection for theZoological Society of London (ZSL), the animals from the Tower of London ’s menagerie were transferred there in 1832 and it opened to the public in 1847. Today it houses more than 20,000 animals and almost 700 species.ZSL is not funded by the state – it relies on memberships and fellowships, entrance fees and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Linda Nylind and Matt Fidler Tags: Conservation Environment Zoology London Wildlife Animals UK news Science Biology Source Type: news

From smugglers to supermarkets: the 'informal economy' touches us all
You may think that a smuggler in the Tunisian desert has nothing to do with your trip to the supermarket. You ’re wrongAs I talk to him, Ahmed pulls his chair into his store to escape the hot Tunisian sun. He is a retired teacher – the years of screaming children can be counted in the rings framing his eyes. Behind him is his merchandise. To make up for a small pension, Ahmed is selling kitchenware in a market near the Libyan border, over four hundred tiny concrete garages surround him, goods piled high: clothes, bags, mic rowaves. It looks like any other market, but note an invisible detail: everything sold here is il...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Max Gallien Tags: Gig economy Economics Science Business Zero-hours contracts Source Type: news

Couple donates bug collection worth $10m, a goldmine for researchers
Collection will help scientists piece together a large branch of insects ’ family tree and be a resource for scientists who study natural controls on the environmentIn two rooms of Charles and Lois O ’Briens’ modest home in Tucson, Arizona, more than a million insects – a collection worth an estimated $10m – rest in tombs of glass and homemade shelving. They come from every continent and corner of the world, gathered over almost six decades; a bug story that began as a love story.This week, the O ’Briens, both octogenarians, announced that they would donate their collection, one of the world’s largest private...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alan Yuhas Tags: Insects Animals Environment Arizona US news Wildlife Science Source Type: news

Passengers in awe of Aurora Australis on first charter flight to see southern lights
‘We’ve travelled two-thirds of the way to the south pole, seen an incredible display and were home for breakfast,’ says organiserThe first commercial flight to view the Aurora Australis landed in New Zealand early on Friday, with 130 star-struck passengers sharing the experience on social media.The eight-hour charter flight took off from the South Island on Thursday and flew to a latitude of 62 degrees south, where organisers said passengers were guaranteed a view of the aurora.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Naaman Zhou Tags: Space Science Australia news New Zealand Source Type: news

Breitbart's James Delingpole says reef bleaching is 'fake news', hits peak denial | Graham Readfearn
A claim like this takes lashings of chutzpah, blinkers the size of Trump ’s hairspray bill and more hubris than you can shake a branch of dead coral atIt takes a very special person to label the photographed, documented, filmed and studied phenomenon of mass coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef “fake news”.You need lashings of chutzpah, blinkers the size of Donald Trump ’s hairspray bill and more hubris than you can shake a branch of dead coral at.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Graham Readfearn Tags: Great Barrier Reef Climate change scepticism Coral Environment Science Media Queensland Australia news Marine life Australian politics Source Type: news

Changes to flight paths could reduce aircraft effect on climate
Small alterations to routing, which would add about 1% to airlines ’ operating costs, could have significant resultsSmall tweaks to flight paths could reduce the effects that aircraft have on climate by as much as 10%, a new study shows. For a roughly 1% increase in operating costs, airlines could make significant climate change cuts by optimising their routes according to the weather, time of day and time of year.Aircraft affect Earth ’s climate by emitting greenhouse gases, and creating contrails, which alter the way radiation is reflected back to space. An estimated 5% of manmade climate change is caused by global a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kate Ravilious Tags: Climate change Airline industry Meteorology Environment Science Source Type: news

The Guardian view on biotechnologies: rewriting our future | Editorial
The creation of synthetic yeast chromosomes is a breathtaking feat by scientists – but the whole of society needs to engage with the implications of such researchDNA is often described as a long string of letters, each representing a particular chemical. The metaphor is about to become much more powerful: scientists are reaching the point where they can arrange these chemical letters with as much precision as ordinary letters in a word processor. They will be able to spell out any protein that they might want a cell to build, a power which will change the world profoundly.Researchers saythey have designed and built ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Genetics Science Biology Research and development Technology UK news Source Type: news

Purging the body of 'retired' cells could reverse ageing, study shows
Findings raise possibility that a future therapy that rids the body of senescent cells might protect against the ravages of old agePurging retired cells from the body has been shown to undo the ravages of old age in a study that raises the prospect of new life-extending treatments .When mice were treated with a substance designed to sweep away cells that have entered a dormant state due to DNA damage their fur regrew, kidney function improved and they were able to run twice as far as untreated elderly animals.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Ageing Science Medical research Biology Source Type: news

‘Moore’s law’ for carbon would defeat global warming
A plan to halve carbon emissions every decade, while green energy continues to double every five years, provides a simple but rigorous roadmap to tackle climate change, scientists sayA new “carbon law”, modelled on Moore’s law in computing, has been proposed as a roadmap for beating climate change. It sees carbon emissions halving every decade, while green energy continues to double every five years.The carbon law ’s proponents are senior climate-change scientists and they argue it provides a simple, broad but quantitative plan that could drive governments and businesses to make urgently needed carbon cuts, particu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Tags: Climate change Greenhouse gas emissions Fossil fuels World news Science Environment Renewable energy Source Type: news

How the media warp science: the case of the sensationalised satnav
Reports of research that shows that satnavs “switch off” parts of the brain are a perfect example of how the media distorts science, often unintentionallyThere ’s a famous cliché which says “If you like sausage, you should never see one being made”. Well, earlier this week I saw how a science news story occurred, from experiment to media coverage, and I think the same applies here.A UCL study titled “Hippocampal and prefrontal processing of network topology to simulate the future” was published in Nature Communications earlier this week. The human brain’scapacity for spatial navigation is fairly formidable...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dean Burnett Tags: Science Neuroscience Media Science and scepticism Source Type: news

Stunning 'new' cloud formations captured in updated atlas – in pictures
Roll clouds and wave-like asperitas are among the additions to the new digital International Cloud Atlas, that dates back to the 19th century. It features hundreds of images captured by meteorologists and cloud lovers from around the worldHave you seen any of the “new” cloud formations?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Meteorology Environment Science Source Type: news

Let there be light: Germans switch on 'largest artificial sun'
Scientists hope experiment, which can generate temperatures of around 3,500C, will help to develop carbon-neutral fuelGerman scientists are switching on “the world’s largest artificial sun” in the hope that intense light sources can be used to generate climate-friendly fuel.The Synlight experiment in J ülich, about 19 miles west of Cologne, consists 149 souped-up film projector spotlights and produces light about 10,000 times the intensity of natural sunlight on Earth.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Energy research Physics Science Climate change Renewable energy Environment Technology Germany Europe World news The sun Solar power Source Type: news

Decades of TB progress threatened by drug-resistant bacteria, warn experts
Rise of multi-drug resistant strains of tuberculosis could derail global efforts to eradicate the disease, according to a new reportThe rise of multi-drug resistant bacteria threatens to overturn decades of progress ontuberculosis (TB), experts are warning.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Tuberculosis Drug resistance Medical research Health Society Science Antibiotics Source Type: news

Living and looking for lavatories – why researching relief is so relevant
Toilets are a source of interaction, social structures, organisation, norms and values. So why aren ’t sociologists discussing them more?It may be a turn of the stomach, a nervous flutter, a morning coffee or a sudden, unpredictable rush. You may look for a sign, if you are lucky enough to live in a society where they are readily available. There may or may not be a queue, often depending on the room of your gender. You may look for disabled access, whether you are in a wheelchair or have an invisible illness. You may select a space based on who is there, or your perception of its cleanliness. For some, it is an unwritte...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lauren White Tags: Science Irritable bowel syndrome Digestive disorders Society Social sciences Source Type: news

To Be a Machine by Mark O ’Connell review – solving the problem of death
A captivating exploration of transhumanism features cryonics, cyborgs, immortality and the hubris of Silicon ValleyMax More runs Alcor, an American company which, in exchange for $200,000, will store your corpse in liquid nitrogen until the science exists to revive you. Tim Cannon is a computer programmer who implanted a device the size of a pack of cards into his arm, without the aid of anaesthetics.Zoltan Istvan recently ran for US president and publicised his campaign by driving across the country in a huge vehicle modified to look like a coffin.These are among the unusual individuals Mark O ’Connell interviews i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Paul Laity Tags: Science and nature Books Culture Artificial intelligence (AI) Consciousness Technology Computing Human biology Neuroscience Psychology Source Type: news

Moderate drinking can lower risk of heart attack, says study
Drinking in moderation helps protect heart, with study finding it lowers risk of many conditions compared with not drinkingModerate drinking can lower the risk of several heart conditions, according to a study that will further fuel the debate about the health implications of alcohol consumption.The study of 1.93 million people in the UK aged over 30 found that drinking in moderation – defined as consuming no more than 14 units of alcohol a week – had a protective effect on the heart compared with not drinking.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Alcohol Society Health UK news Medical research Heart attack Science Source Type: news

Radical shakeup of dinosaur family tree points to unexpected Scottish origins
Cat-sized Scottish fossil proposed as candidate for common dinosaur ancestor in controversial study that could overthrow a century of dinosaur classificationThe most radical shakeup of the dinosaur family tree in a century has led scientists to propose an unlikely origin for the prehistoric beasts: an obscure cat-sized creature found in Scotland.The analysis, which has already sparked controversy in the academic world, suggests that the two basic groups into which dinosaurs have been classified for more than a century need a fundamental rethink. If proved correct, the revised version of the family tree would overthrow some...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Biology Fossils Science Scotland UK news Source Type: news

Rotavirus vaccine could save lives of almost 500,000 children a year
Positive outcome of trials in Niger fuels hope that vaccine can protect children in sub-Saharan Africa and beyond from infection that causes often fatal diarrhoeaA vaccine capable of enduring scorching temperatures for months at a time could strike a decisive blow in the fight against rotavirus, preventing nearly half a million children around the world from dying of diarrhoea each year.M édecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has hailed successful trials of the BRV-PV vaccine in Niger as a “game changer” in tackling rotavirus infection, which is the leading cause of severe diarrhoea globally and claims the lives of anestimat...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kate Hodal Tags: Global health Global development Vaccines and immunisation Society Africa World news Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

Smartphone app could allow men to test their fertility at home
Gadget designed to clip onto a smartphone able to detect abnormal sperm samples with 98% accuracy in trialsMen may soon be able to measure their own sperm count and quality at home, using a smartphone app developed by scientists.In early tests the gadget, designed to clip onto a smartphone, detected abnormal sperm samples with an accuracy of 98%.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Reproduction Fertility problems Health Society Biology Science Source Type: news

Cryogenic preservation: from single cells to whole organs – Science Weekly podcast
Hannah Devlin looks at recent advances in the field ofcryopreservation and asks how close we are to applying these technologies to whole organsSubscribe& Review oniTunes,Soundcloud,Audioboom,Mixcloud&Acast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterLast year, around 3,500 organs were transplanted into patients in the UK alone. That said, a large number of organs were also discarded because the moment a donor dies, doctors have only eight or so hours to find a patient on the organ register who is a match and can be almost immediately ready for surgery. One recent estimate suggested that as many as 60% of the hear...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Hannah Devlin and produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Organ donation Health Society Source Type: news

Why virtual reality could be a mental health gamechanger
We ’re still a long way from from being able to provide timely treatment to everyone who needs it, but we could be on the brink of change thanks to VRFew tech topics are hotter right now thanvirtual reality (VR). Though it ’s been around for decades, VR has at last entered the world of consumer electronics via devices like theOculus Rift andHTC Vive and, increasingly, headsets that can be used in conjunction with our mobile phones. But VR isn ’t just a technological game-changer: it could transform the way we tackle mental health problems.Not so long ago, talking about psychological problems was taboo. Now the scale ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Freeman and Jason Freeman Tags: Virtual reality Psychology Mental health Science Technology Society Source Type: news

Face of Cambridge man brought to life 700 years after his death
Reconstruction is part of research project aimed at gaining insights into the anonymous poor of the medieval cityThe face of a Cambridge man who died more than 700 years ago has been reconstructed as part of a project to gain insights into the anonymous poor of the medieval city.The 13th-century man,known as Context 958 by researchers, was among hundreds whose remains werefound in a graveyard under what is now the Old Divinity School of St John ’s College.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dalya Alberge Tags: Archaeology Cambridge UK news Heritage Culture Science Source Type: news

Did I make the right decision? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Anouchka Grose
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life ’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesThis has to be at the more abstract end of “things to ask the internet”. If you wanted a standard, hippy-humanist answer such as: “It’s right if it feels right, and wrong if it feels wrong”, you’d probably just ask a reasonably kind and thoughtful person. The fact that this question is addressed to a giant information network tha t knows absolutely nothing about you or your circumstances surely means it’s serious. That it’s also asked post factum suggests a misch...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Anouchka Grose Tags: Psychology Science Internet Source Type: news

Drug scandals and the media – the unresolved case of Primodos
Primodos: The Secret Drug Scandal, airs on Sky this week. Will this media intervention repeat history by helping campaigners get compensation?If the history of drug scandals teaches us anything, it is that fair compensation is typically achieved only through lengthy media campaigns and legal battles. Though lacking the direct powers of judges or policymakers, interventions by investigative journalists and broadcasters have sometimes proved decisive.Take thalidomide: between 1957 and 1961 the widely prescribed morning-sickness treatment caused miscarriages, and many thousands of babies around the world were born with severe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jesse Olszynko-Gryn Tags: Science Health Pregnancy & wellbeing Parents and parenting Society Source Type: news

Walking in the footsteps of giants – and gerbils | Elsa Panciroli
From hopping Cretaceous desert mammals, to muddy Scottish sauropods, fossil footprints reveal more than you might expect about extinct lifeTrekking through damp woodlands in the Scottish Highlands, I pause and look down at my feet. On a thread-like deer trail on a steep hillside, animal footprints have been pressed into a hollow of mud. I reach into my backpack and take out a battered field guide. I identify the imprints as those of a pine marten; an elusive UK carnivore that I ’m told is partial to eating small rodents, eggs, insects… and peanut butter if there are generous humans around. With luck, I may see the trac...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elsa Panciroli Tags: Fossils Evolution Science Biology Source Type: news

Princess Anne backs GM crops and livestock – unlike Prince Charles
Anne says she would farm GM food and GM livestock a ‘bonus’, while Charles says GM crops will cause ‘biggest disaster environmentally of all time’Princess Anne has strongly backed genetically modified crops, saying she would grow them on her own land and that GM livestock would be a “bonus”.Her stance puts her sharply at odds with her brother Prince Charles, who has long opposed GM food and has said it will cause the “biggest disaster environmentally of all time”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Tags: GM Farming Monarchy Environment UK news Prince Charles Animals Science Source Type: news