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ECDC report shows strong potential of E-health to increase vaccination coverage in Europe
(European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)) Twenty one EU/EEA countries have developed or are in the process of developing systems to digitally record information about vaccination, according to a new 'ECDC survey report on immunization information systems implementation and system characteristics'. Fourteen of these countries already have a system in place, whereas innovative systems are being piloted in 7 countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Spatial epidemiology used to identify 3 key hepatitis C hotspots in Massachusetts
(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) Public health researchers from Tufts and colleagues conducted a spatial epidemiology study to identify hotspot clusters of hepatitis C infections in Massachusetts. The information may help to make the best use of funding for education, prevention, testing, and treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Using rooster testes to learn how the body fights viruses
(University of Rochester Medical Center) Our bodies are constantly under siege by foreign invaders; viruses, bacteria and parasites that want to infiltrate our cells. Using rooster testes, scientists shed light on how germ cells -- sperm and egg -- protect themselves from viruses so that they can pass accurate genetic information to the next generation. The findings could help researchers better fight viruses in chickens and in people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A quarter of nursing home residents are colonized with drug-resistant bacteria
(Elsevier Health Sciences) The significant presence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), such as E. coli, among nursing home residents demonstrates the need for heightened infection control prevention and control measures in nursing homes, according to a meta-analysis published in the May issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New publication highlights the anti-malarial efficacy of exciting new clinical candidate
(University of Cape Town) A new paper published today in the prestigious journal Science Translational Medicine describes the discovery, and biological profiling, of an exciting new anti-malarial clinical drug candidate, MMV390048, effective against resistant strains of the malaria parasite, and across the entire parasite lifecycle, with the potential to cure and protect in a single dose. The research was conducted by the University of Cape Town (UCT)'s Drug Discovery and Development Centre, H3D and Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV), in collaboration with a team of international researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infect...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fighting infections with a silver sword
(Experimental Biology 2017) Silver has been used to fight infections since ancient times. Today, researchers are using sophisticated techniques such as the gene-editing platform Crispr-Cas9 to take a closer look at how silver poisons pathogens. The work is yielding new insights on how to create effective antimicrobials and avoid the pitfalls of antimicrobial resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

With synthetic mucus, researchers take aim at antibiotic resistance
(Experimental Biology 2017) The human body produces about a gallon of mucus per day. By studying and replicating mucus' natural ability to control pathogenic bacteria, scientists hope to find new methods for combating infections and antibiotic resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Novel phage therapy saves patient with multidrug-resistant bacterial infection
(University of California - San Diego) Scientists and physicians at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, working with colleagues at the US Navy Medical Research Center -- Biological Defense Research Directorate (NMRC-BDRD), Texas A&M University, a San Diego-based biotech and elsewhere, have successfully used an experimental therapy involving bacteriophages -- viruses that target and consume specific strains of bacteria -- to treat a patient near death from a multidrug-resistant bacterium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areas
(Radiological Society of North America) Researchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Measuring immune response could be key to differentiating malaria from other infections
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) Analyzing a patient's immune response could be key to quickly and accurately diagnosing malaria, according to research presented on World Malaria Day at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nanosponges lessen severity of streptococcal infections
(Experimental Biology 2017) In a new study, researchers show that engineered nanosponges can reduce the severity of infections caused by the bacteria responsible for strep throat and flesh-eating disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers aim to eliminate malaria in southeast Asia
(Penn State) Researchers at Penn State have received more than $1 million in first-year funding from the National Institutes of Health to investigate malaria transmission in Southeast Asia with a goal of working toward the disease's elimination in the region. They will receive up to approximately $9 million over seven years for this project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Patients with drug-resistant malaria cured by plant therapy developed at WPI
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) When the standard malaria medications failed to help 18 critically ill patients, the attending physician in a Congo clinic acted under the 'compassionate use' doctrine and prescribed a not-yet-approved malaria therapy made only from the dried leaves of the Artemisia annua plant. In just five days, all 18 people fully recovered. This small but stunningly successful trial is detailed in a new paper in Phytomedicine by lead author Pamela Weathers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Lyme disease researchers seek consensus as number of cases grows
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Scientists have built a large body of knowledge about Lyme disease over the past 40 years, yet controversies remain and the number of cases continues to rise. In the United States, reported cases of Lyme disease, which is transmitted from wild animals to humans by tick bites, have tripled in the past 20 years. A multitude of interacting factors are driving the increase in Lyme disease cases, but their relative importance remains unclear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Canadian guideline: No screening for hepatitis C in adults not at increased risk
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommends against screening for chronic hepatitis C virus in adults at low risk in a guideline published in Canadian Medical Association Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Malaria sickening thousands in US and racking up millions in healthcare costs, new study finds
(Burness) A new study published today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene shows that malaria led to a count of hospitalized patients and deaths that easily eclipsed other travel-related illness and generated about half a billion dollars in healthcare costs in the US over a 15-year period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Conservation not an effective tool for reducing infectious disease in people, study finds
(University of Washington) A new study finds that improved human health is not a benefit of conservation -- at least when health is measured through the lens of infectious disease. The paper analyzed the relationship between infectious diseases and their environmental, demographic and economic drivers in dozens of countries over 20 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New test can identify dangerous bacteria with resistance to last-resort antibiotic
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) New research suggests it is possible to quickly and accurately diagnose some the most dangerous and drug-resistant types of bacterial infections, using equipment already owned by most hospitals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study of bacteria's DNA fingerprint suggests it could be spreading via food distribution
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) Foods should be investigated as a potential source of spread of Clostridium difficile, according to research presented at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

WHO's Global Hepatitis Report sets baseline to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030
(World Hepatitis Alliance) The World Hepatitis Alliance today welcomes the publication of the first-ever Global Hepatitis Report by the World Health Organization (WHO), which includes new data on the prevalence and global burden of viral hepatitis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibody delivery mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus
(Bentham Science Publishers) Monoclonal antibody (mAb) based-therapies have revolutionized treatments of cancer and autoimmune diseases because of their specificity and limited toxicity (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Atomic-level motion may drive bacteria's ability to evade immune system defenses
(Indiana University) A study from Indiana University has found evidence that extremely small changes in how atoms move in bacterial proteins can play a big role in how these microorganisms function and evolve traits, such as antibiotic resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Investigational dose of oral interferon-free treatment can cure hepatitis C in children
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) A study presented today that evaluated an investigational dosage of once-daily ledipasvir 45 mg/sofosbuvir 200 mg (LDV/SOF) in children aged six to 11 years infected with HCV, found that 99 percent of children had undetectable levels of HCV-RNA 12 weeks after treatment. The study, presented at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, showed that the fixed-dose combination of LDV/SOF was well-tolerated, and no patients experienced serious adverse events related to the study drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fecal microbiota transplants improve cognitive impairment caused by severe liver disease
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) A study presented today found that fecal transplantation of bacteria from one healthy donor into patients that suffer from hepatic encephalopathy, is safe and improves cognitive function compared with standard of care treatment for the condition. Presented at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, the study results also demonstrated that the number of hospitalizations following fecal transplantation plus antibiotics was two, compared to the standard of care arm, which was 11. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Treatment of HCV allows for sustained removal from the liver transplant waiting list
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) A new European study presented today demonstrated that patients with chronic HCV and severe liver damage, taken off the liver transplant list as a result of successful DAA therapy, had a favorable outcome over a year later. The study, presented at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, showed that 26.7 percent of patients could be removed from the waiting list due to clinical improvement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Blood donor screening for hepatitis E reveals incidence is higher than previously reported
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) Results from a study presented today found that the incidence of HEV RNA in asymptomatic blood donors from Germany is higher than previously reported. The study, presented at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, showed that 0.11 percent of donations tested were HEV RNA positive and that one of the asymptomatic HEV RNA positive donors had previously donated HEV RNA positive blood products, which were then transfused into nine immunocompromised patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Clostridium difficile infections linked to higher death rates if infection recurs
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) Two presentations at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) show that repeated infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), which causes stomach upsets and diarrhoea, is linked to higher death rates, as well as having a significant impact on health services in terms of cost and hospital beds occupied. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

On the brink of eradication: Why polio research matters
(PLOS) In the decades since Dr. Jonas Salk developed the first polio vaccine, cases of polio have exponentially declined. Though once widespread epidemic, the highly infectious childhood disease is now close to global eradication. The question remains: why would researchers spend time and resources studying a virus already on the brink of total eradication? (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

No link found between HIV levels and immune activation during antiretroviral treatment
(PLOS) Despite successful treatment, people receiving antiretroviral drugs continue to have small amounts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in their blood, as well as elevated immune system activation. However, new research published in PLOS Pathogens shows no correlation between these two measurements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases celebrates 10th anniversary
(PLOS) The recently published 10th Anniversary Collection in PLOS NTDs marks the journal's important milestone with retrospective pieces featuring over 20 NTDs. The articles in the collection reflect on significant lessons and successes in the field over the past decade as well as identify some of the remaining challenges. Together, they lay out a road map for future research priorities, identifying key opportunities for further progress in disease elimination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pretreatment HIV, immune activation levels determine their persistence during treatment
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator finds that pretreatment levels of HIV and immune activation appear to determine the extent to which viral levels and inflammation persist during antiretroviral treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gut bacteria give newborns infection protection, not just digestion, mouse study shows
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Hundreds of thousands of babies worldwide die every year from infections that ravage their digestive systems. Could the difference in survival come not from their immature immune systems, but rather from the mix of bacteria that grow in their tiny guts? New research in mice offers evidence that some of those bacteria -- called Clostridia -- provide key protection against infection, in addition to helping digest food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bringing the 'magic' of ultrasound to rural Uganda to reduce pregnancy complications
(Lawson Health Research Institute) In a collaborative study, a team of researchers found that radio advertising for free ultrasounds in rural Uganda increased the number of pregnant women who attended modern medical care by 490 per cent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists uncover details on the rise of a tick-borne disease on Long Island
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health report elevated levels of a pathogen responsible for the tick-borne disease babesiosis in Suffolk County, New York, where rates are the highest in the state. Results are published in the journal mSphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Periodic model predicts the spread of Lyme disease
(Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Lyme disease is among the most common vector-borne illnesses in North America, Europe, and some parts of Asia. A spirochete bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes the disease, and blacklegged ticks are responsible for the majority of North American transmissions. In a paper publishing next week in the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems, Xiunan Wang and Xiao-Qiang Zhao present a mathematical model of Lyme disease that incorporates seasonality and climate factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New weapon in fight against antibiotic resistance discovered
(Canadian Science Publishing) Scientists have designed an antibiotic that could combat WHO priority pathogens by suppressing the energy supply of bacteria (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis reduces mortality in people with advanced liver disease
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) A multicenter, randomized, controlled study presented today found that long-term oral antibiotic therapy with norfloxacin improved the prognosis of people with life-threatening advanced liver disease. The study, presented at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, showed that norfloxacin administration for six months was associated with a reduced risk of death and infection at six months in patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis, a very severe and advanced stage of liver disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

ILC 2017: New EASL clinical practice guidelines on the management of hepatitis B virus
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) today published their revised Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) on the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The CPGs, which will also be presented in a session at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, are designed to help physicians and healthcare providers optimize the management of patients with either acute or chronic HBV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UK: Serious liver disease develops in one-third of young people with childhood acquired HCV
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) Results from a retrospective review of a UK national HCV database found that over one-third of young people ( (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Investigational DAA treatment combination effective and improves patient-reported outcomes
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) Analysis of patient outcome data from the POLARIS-1, 2, 3 and 4 studies demonstrate that patients with HCV and cirrhosis have greatest improvements of PRO scores when taking treatment with sofosbuvir + velpatasvir, ± voxilaprevir, an anti-HCV regimen that has been shown to be safe and effective against all HCV genotypes. The analysis, presented at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, showed that achievement of SVR12 was associated with improvements in PROs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Defective HIV proviruses reduce effective immune system response, interfere with HIV cure
(George Washington University) A new study finds defective HIV proviruses, long thought to be harmless, produce viral proteins and distract the immune system from killing intact proviruses needed to reduce the HIV reservoir and cure HIV. The study was published by researchers at the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University in Cell Host& Microbe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New study explains extraordinary resilience of deadly bacterium
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers at the University of Maryland have identified how the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses tension-activated membrane channels to stop itself from swelling up and bursting when it is suddenly exposed to water. The study, which will be published April 19 in The Journal of General Physiology, helps explain how this bacterium -- a major cause of hospital-acquired infections -- persists in a variety of different environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New evidence: Defective HIV proviruses hinder immune system response and cure
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Researchers at Johns Hopkins and George Washington universities report new evidence that proteins created by defective forms of HIV long previously believed to be harmless actually interact with our immune systems and are actively monitored by a specific type of immune cell, called cytotoxic T cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Frog slime kills flu virus
(Emory Health Sciences) Frogs' skins were known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria. The finding suggests that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Killing flu viruses with help from a frog
(Cell Press) Frog mucus is loaded with molecules that kill bacteria and viruses, and researchers are beginning to investigate it as a potential source for new anti-microbial drugs. One of these 'host defense peptides,' courtesy of a colorful tennis-ball-sized frog species (Hydrophylax bahuvistara) from southern India, can destroy many strains of human flu and protect mice against flu infection, researchers report April 18 in the journal Immunity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bacteriophages, natural drugs to combat superbugs
(Baylor College of Medicine) Viruses that specifically kill bacteria, called bacteriophages, might one day help solve the growing problem of bacterial infections that are resistant to antibiotic treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers identify tactic Dengue virus uses to delay triggering immune response
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai researchers describe novel mechanism cells use to recognize earliest stages of infection and how virus evades triggering an immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 18, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists engineer human-germ hybrid molecules to attack drug-resistant bacteria
(Rockefeller University) Taking a cue from viruses that infect and kill bacteria, the researchers engineered molecules capable of targeting the bugs in a way the human immune system cannot -- an approach that could be particularly valuable against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UTHealth part of international study to test efficacy of injectable HIV prevention drug
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), which includes McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), has launched a study to evaluate whether a new injectable medication can work as well as an existing oral pill to safely protect against HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW) who have sex with men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UNC researchers identify a new HIV reservoir
(University of North Carolina Health Care) A UNC research team has identified a new cell in the body where HIV persists despite treatment. This discovery has major implications for cure research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news