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Surgery to remove unaffected breast in early breast cancer increases
(American Cancer Society) The proportion of women in the United States undergoing surgery for early-stage breast cancer who have preventive mastectomy to remove the unaffected breast increased significantly in recent years, particularly among younger women, and varied substantially across states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study finds 1 in 8 Calgary homes exceed Health Canada's acceptable radon level
(University of Calgary) Radon gas is a colorless, odorless radioactive gas that has been linked to lung cancer. University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, researchers have proven it's prevalent throughout southern Alberta homes. Undertaking one of the largest Canadian municipal studies to date, Aaron Goodarzi, Ph.D., and his team tested radon levels in more than 2,300 Calgary and area homes. The results show that there is no unaffected neighborhood. The study is published in today's CMAJ Open. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mechanism for hMTH1's broad substrate specificity revealed
(Kumamoto University) Researchers from Japan have revealed the mechanism that gives the hMTH1 protein broad substrate specificity, i.e., the ability to catalyze more than one substrate. The discovery could be used to improve current anticancer therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Journal: Researchers can track hazardous chemicals from fast-food wrappers in the body
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Just one month after major research findings showed dangerous PFAS present in more than one-third of fast food packaging tested, UAB and Notre Dame created a new technique to track PFASs in the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fred Hutch scientists to cover advances in immunotherapy, proteomics at AACR
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Scientists from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle are scheduled to present and discuss the latest developments in immunotherapy and proteomics at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, Research Propelling Cancer Prevention and Cures, on April 1-5. What follows is a selection of the more than 30 Hutch presentations at the AACR gathering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Case comprehensive cancer center analyzes brain tumor data, doubles known risk factors for glioma
(Case Western Reserve University) A massive new study involving blood samples from over 30,000 individuals has identified 13 new genetic risk factors for glioma, the most common type of malignant brain tumor in adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study finds one in eight Calgary homes exceed Health Canada's acceptable radon level
(University of Calgary) Radon gas is a colourless, odourless radioactive gas that has been linked to lung cancer. University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, researchers have proven it's prevalent throughout southern Alberta homes. Undertaking one of the largest Canadian municipal studies to date, Aaron Goodarzi, PhD and his team tested radon levels in more than 2,300 Calgary and area homes. The results show that there is no unaffected neighborhood. The study is published in today's CMAJ Open. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Vitamin D, calcium supplementation among older women does not significantly reduce risk of cancer
(The JAMA Network Journals) Among healthy postmenopausal women, supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium compared with placebo did not result in a significantly lower risk of cancer after four years, according to a study published by JAMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Findings support use of less invasive hysterectomy for early-stage endometrial cancer
(The JAMA Network Journals) Researchers found similar rates of disease-free survival and no difference in overall survival among women who received a laparoscopic or abdominal total hysterectomy for stage I endometrial cancer, according to a study published by JAMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Female menstrual cycle in a dish
(Northwestern University) What if women could have a miniature, personalized reproductive system made with their own tissues that could predict how they would respond to certain medications? Northwestern has developed the first phase of this technology, made with human tissue, which could eventually change the future of research and treatment of diseases in women's reproductive organs. It will allow physicians to test drugs for safety and effectiveness and better understand such diseases as endometriosis, fibroids, cancer and infertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rogue breast tumor proteins point to potential drug therapies
(Washington University School of Medicine) For patients with difficult-to-treat cancers, doctors increasingly rely on genomic testing of tumors to identify errors in the DNA that indicate a tumor can be targeted by existing therapies. But this approach overlooks rogue proteins that may be driving cancer cells and also could be targeted with existing treatments, according to research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Interferon-beta producing stem cell-derived immune cell therapy on liver cancer
(Kumamoto University) Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived myeloid cells (iPS-ML) that produce the anti-tumor protein interferon-beta (IFN-beta) have been produced and analyzed by researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan. Using human iPS-ML in a mouse model, they found that the cells migrate to and deliver IFN-beta to liver tumors thereby reducing cancer proliferation and increasing survival time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Announcing the inaugural online immuno-oncology symposium
(Future Science Group) Oncology Central is delighted to be hosting, 'Practical clinical aspects of immuno-oncology' a two-day online symposium exploring the latest developments in cancer immunotherapy, chaired by Professor Angus Dalgleish (St. George's, University of London). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tiny sensor lays groundwork for precision X-rays detection via endoscopy
(The Optical Society) Using a tiny device known as an optical antenna, researchers have created an X-ray sensor that is integrated onto the end of an optical fiber just a few tens of microns in diameter. By detecting X-rays at an extremely small spatial scale, the sensor could be combined with X-ray delivering technologies to enable high-precision medical imaging and therapeutic applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

5,000 and counting: Penn Medicine celebrates reconstruction milestone
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Doctors in Penn Medicine's Division of Plastic Surgery recently performed their 5,000th free flap reconstructive surgery. Their milestone will be the focus of a presentation at the 96th Annual American Association of Plastic Surgeons Meeting in Austin, Texas, in which they will educate leaders from other institutions on the process of building a free flap program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Georgia Cancer Center participates in NCI-driven initiative to understand racial, ethnic, age disparities in six cancers
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) The Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University is one of a dozen sites across the nation helping build a molecular profile of six cancers that often strike early and disparately. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ASCO and Cancer Care Ontario update guideline on radiation therapy for prostate cancer
(American Society of Clinical Oncology) The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Cancer Care Ontario today issued a joint clinical practice guideline update on brachytherapy (internal radiation) for patients with prostate cancer. The update provides evidence-based recommendations for different patient risk groups, and specifies the most effective forms of brachytherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UQ opens new era in cancer research and drug development
(University of Queensland) New cancer-fighting drugs could emerge from The University of Queensland in coming years, thanks to a state-of-the-art imaging facility opened today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Protein identified as potential druggable target for pancreatic cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A protein known as arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) may be a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic cancer, and one of the most deadliest with a less than 10 percent, five-year survival rate. PRMT1 is involved in a number of genetic processes including gene transcription, DNA repair and signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic researchers identify interaction among proteins that cause cancer cells to metastasize
(Mayo Clinic) Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified an interaction among proteins that allows cancer cells to grow and metastasize. They say the discovery may play a role in developing a better understanding of how tumors grow in a variety of malignancies, including breast, prostate, pancreatic, colon, lung and skin cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Prostate screening often occurs without discussion of benefits, risks
(Brown University) Less than a third of men in a large national survey reported talking with their doctor about both the pros and cons of the PSA blood test for prostate cancer, and the likelihood has decreased further since a national panel recommended against the test. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Toward glow-in-the-dark tumors: New fluorescent probe could light up cancer
(Michigan Technological University) A fluorescent probe developed by Michigan Tech chemist Haiying Liu lights up the enzyme beta-galactosidase in a cell culture. The glowing probe-enzyme combination could make tumors fluoresce, allowing surgeons to cut away cancer while leaving healthy tissue intact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New method heats up ultrasonic approach to treating tumors
(American Institute of Physics) High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a breakthrough therapeutic technique used to treat tumors. The principle of this noninvasive, targeted treatment is much like that of focusing sunlight through a lens, using an ultrasonic transducer like a convex lens to concentrate ultrasound into a small focal region. Researchers have now designed a transducer for potential application in HIFU that can generate a steady, standing-wave field with a subwavelength-scale focal region and extremely high ultrasound intensity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MicroRNA treatment restores nerve insulation, limb function in mice with MS
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Scientists partially re-insulated ravaged nerves in mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and restored limb mobility by treating the animals with a small non-coding RNA called a microRNA. In a study published online March 27 in Developmental Cell, researchers report that treatment with a microRNA called miR-219 restarted production of a substance called myelin that is critical to normal function of the central nervous system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Major genetic study identifies 12 new genetic variants for ovarian cancer
(University of Cambridge) A genetic trawl through the DNA of almost 100,000 people, including 17,000 patients with the most common type of ovarian cancer, has identified 12 new genetic variants that increase risk of developing the disease and confirmed the association of 18 of the previously published variants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Largest ever brain cancer study reveals new secrets to inherited risk
(Institute of Cancer Research) Scientists have uncovered a treasure trove of information about the genetic causes of brain cancer in the largest ever study of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New tool allows analysis of single-cell RNA data in pre-malignant tumours
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists and their collaborators have developed a new analysis tool that showed, for the first time, which genes were expressed by individual cells in different genetic versions of a benign blood cancer. Reported in Nature Methods today, the new computer tool -- Single Cell Consensus Clustering -- was shown to be more accurate and robust than existing methods of analyzing single-cell RNA sequence data, and is freely available for researchers to use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study provides path for new immunotherapy approaches to prostate cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Prostate cancer, notoriously resistant to immunotherapy due to its immunologically cool nature, triggers two pathways to chill an immune attack after one immunotherapy drug fires up the immune system, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Nature Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How randomness helps cancer cells thrive
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a research effort that merged genetics, physics and information theory, a team at the Schools of Medicine and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University has added significantly to evidence that large regions of the human genome have built-in variability in reversible epigenetic modifications made to their DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Minority colorectal cancer patients report higher burden of poor quality-of-life
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A study of racial disparities in health-related quality of life of colorectal cancer patients revealed among several findings, that Hispanics and blacks had a higher burden of poor health-related quality-of-life (HR-QoL) than white patients and that poor HR-QoL resulted in shorter median survival. Yet Hispanics had an average survival time of 85.4 months as compared to blacks at 47.8 months and whites at 43.2 months. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Public-private research to develop more accurate ways of measuring cancer progression
(Columbia University Medical Center) A public-private research effort aims to develop more accurate ways of tracking a patient's response to cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers show p300 protein may suppress leukemia in MDS patients
(University of Miami Miller School of Medicine) Scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have shown that p300, a protein that increases gene expression by attaching acetyl molecules to DNA, may stop myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) from developing into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Kent State chemists create microscopic environment to study cancer cell growth
(Kent State University) An online publication in Nature Nanotechnology this week by Kent State University researchers and their colleagues at Kyoto University in Japan, however, may offer new understanding about what turns good cells bad. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New finding could lead to earlier liver cancer diagnosis
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have now developed a way to determine, by sequencing DNA of liver cells, whether cells have been exposed to aflatoxin. This profile of mutations could be used to predict whether someone has a high risk of developing liver cancer, potentially many years before tumors actually appear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Survivors of childhood brain tumors have increased body fat
(McMaster University) These findings suggest that one of the most important risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, which is excess total and central fat in the body, is present relatively early in survivors of childhood brain tumors. This may program their future risk of these diseases and impact their outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

'Jumonji' protein key to Ewing's sarcoma rampage
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Oncogene pinpoints a protein that may be essential to Ewing's sarcoma metastasis -- when researchers knocked down the protein KDM3A in Ewing's sarcoma tumor cells, one of a family known as Jumonji proteins, they also inhibited the cancer's metastatic ability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Microwave-induced bismuth salts-mediated synthesis of molecules of medicinal interests
(Bentham Science Publishers) The products obtained via bismuth salts-mediated reactions are medicinally active or starting materials for the synthesis of biologically active molecules including sex hormones, anticancer agents, antibacterial agents and agents for chagas diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BRCA testing on the rise for those without breast or ovarian cancers
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) More women are requesting BRCA gene testing associated with certain types of cancer thanks to increased interest in the procedure. Traditionally women tested for mutations in the cancer-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been those diagnosed with early onset breast or ovarian cancer in order to guide treatment options. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

In a sample of blood, researchers probe for cancer clues
(University of California - Berkeley) One day, patients may be able to monitor their body's response to cancer therapy just by having their blood drawn. A new study, led by bioengineers at UC Berkeley, has taken an important step in that direction by measuring a panel of cancer proteins in rare, individual tumor cells that float in the blood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Computer program developed to diagnose and locate cancer from a blood sample
(BioMed Central) Researchers in the United States have developed a computer program that can simultaneously detect cancer and identify where in the body the cancer is located, from a patient's blood sample. The program is described in research published this week in the open access journal Genome Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New study finds that most cancer mutations are due to random DNA copying 'mistakes'
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report data from a new study providing evidence that random, unpredictable DNA copying 'mistakes' account for nearly two-thirds of the mutations that cause cancer. Their research is grounded on a novel mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new approach to target an 'undruggable' prostate cancer driver
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) When small-molecule inhibitors proved elusive, researchers developed a novel strategy: Using large molecule peptides to target a common prostate cancer driver. It may provide a path for developing new therapies against a challenging target. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Preterm births more common in mothers who are cancer survivors
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) In a study published in the journal JAMA Oncology, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report that women diagnosed and treated for cancer during their childbearing years more commonly gave birth prematurely, and to babies whose weights were below normal. Cancer survivors also had a slightly higher rate of cesarean section deliveries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study examines birth outcomes for adolescent & young adult cancer survivors
(The JAMA Network Journals) A new article published online by JAMA Oncology from Hazel B. Nichols, Ph.D., Chelsea Anderson, M.P.H., and coauthors at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill used a data linkage between the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry and state birth certificate files to examine selected birth outcomes. The study included 2,598 births to female adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and 12,990 births to women without a cancer diagnosis for comparison. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UNSW scientists unveil a giant leap for anti-aging
(University of New South Wales) UNSW researchers have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing, improves DNA repair and could even help NASA get its astronauts to Mars. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Clot or bleeding?
(University of Helsinki) Because major surgery increases the risk of venous thrombosis, patients are often treated with anticoagulant medications to prevent thrombosis after surgery. Anticoagulant prophylaxis, however, increases the risk of severe bleeding. The international research group has now studied the risk of thrombosis and severe hemorrhage after urological cancer operations and other forms of urological surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Keck School of Medicine of USC receives grant for esophageal cancer research
(University of Southern California - Health Sciences) The Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) has been awarded a grant from the DeGregorio Family Foundation and Price Family Foundation to support research aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of how gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) increases the risk of developing esophageal cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Significant increase in number of women tested for BRCA gene, but many high-risk patients still missing out
(Elsevier Health Sciences) Previously, mainly women with a history of cancer were referred for genetic testing, but as awareness has grown, more low-risk women are undergoing BRCA testing. A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that the proportion of women without a history of cancer who underwent BRCA testing rose sharply from 24.3% in 2004 to 61.5% in 2014. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How do metals interact with DNA?
(University of Vienna) Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. An international team of scientists, led by Leticia Gonz á lez from the University of Vienna and Jacinto S á from the Uppsala University, have developed a protocol that is able to detect how metal-based drugs interact with DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

After the epigenome: The epitranscriptome
(IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute) Today, an article published in Cancer Discovery by Manel Esteller explains that RNA also has its own spelling and grammar, just like DNA. These 'epigenetics of RNA' are called epitranscriptome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news