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Cancer Facts and Figures: Death Rate Down 25% Since 1991
By Stacy Simon The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 2 decades, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. The cancer death rate for men and women combined fell 25% from its peak in 1991 to 2014, the most recent year for which data are available. This decline translates to more than 2.1 million deaths averted during this time period. “Cancer Statistics, 2017,” published in the American Cancer Society’s journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the US this year. The estimat...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news

Prep Ahead for Healthier Meals
By Stacy SimonEating healthy meals and snacks throughout the week is easier when you plan them out and even prepare them ahead of time. Preparation can include making whole meals on the weekend and freezing in individual or family-size portions. Or it can mean cooking, mixing, or chopping parts of meals so they are easy to grab for recipes as you need them.Colleen Doyle, MS, RD, managing director of nutrition and physical activity for the American Cancer Society, says eating well is one of the most important steps any of us can take to stay healthy and lower cancer risk. To prep ahead for meals, Doyle recommends:Pre-cookin...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

When It’s More Than the Winter Blues
By Stacy Simon The gifts have been opened, the holiday meals eaten, the visitors gone home, and the decorations put away for another year. As the fun and festivities become memories, this is the time of year many people feel a little let down or sad. Treating yourself to a movie, spending time with friends, doing volunteer work, or participating in physical activities you enjoy can help you cheer up and regain your emotional balance. RESOURCES: Depression in cancer patients But for some people, it isn’t that easy. Sadness that doesn’t go away or keeps you from enjoying things you usually like could be a sign ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Coping with Cancer Source Type: news

Top 10 Cancer News Stories of 2016
Our team of journalists works hard every day to bring you the latest news and information about cancer topics to keep you informed. We monitor scientific journal articles, government health and cancer reports, and studies from our own American Cancer Society researchers to bring you the news you need about ways to lower your risk from cancer, and ways to cope with the disease.In 2016 we published stories about new findings in cancer risk factors, treatments, and survivorship issues in children and adults. Our writers and editors have chosen the 10 most significant stories of the year.HPV drops since vaccinations began in U...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 29, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news

New Cancer Drug Approvals From 2016
Chemotherapy is one of the most powerful tools we have to treat cancer, and research continues to find new chemotherapy drugs as well as new uses for existing ones. At the same time, newer types of drugs are continually being developed that work in different ways to attack cancer cells.They include targeted therapy, which aims to more precisely identify cancer cells while doing less damage to normal cells, and immunotherapy, which uses the body’s own immune system to help find and destroy cancer.Before any new drug can be sold in the United States, it has to go through an approval process by the Food and Drug Adminis...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Advanced Cancer Source Type: news

How to Prevent Cervical Cancer or Find It Early
By Stacy Simon RESOURCES: Cervical Health Awareness Month Cervical cancer prevention and early detection HPV and cervical cancer Cervical cancer was once one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women. But over the past several decades, screening – testing for cancer before symptoms develop – has reduced cervical cancer deaths, as doctors have been able to find and treat problems before they become cancer – or find cancer early when it’s easier to treat. The Pap test can find abnormal cells early so they can be treated before they become cancer. The Pap test can also find c...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cervical Cancer Source Type: news

How to Prevent Cervical Cancer or Find It Early
By Stacy Simon Cervical cancer was once one of the most common causes of death for American women. But over the past several decades, screening – testing for cancer before symptoms develop – has reduced cervical cancer deaths, as doctors have been able to find and treat problems before they become cancer – or find cancer early when it's easier to treat. RESOURCES: Cervical cancer resources HPV and cervical cancer Cervical cancer screening guidelines Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer The Pap test can find abnormal cells early so they can be treated before they...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cervical Cancer Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

10 Powerful Survivor Stories From 2016
In Stories of Hope, we regularly publish the stories of people who have a positive message to share, whether their cancer diagnosis was just recently, or long ago. Our featured survivors share words of inspiration, wisdom, hope, and support in these stories about how their lives have been changed by cancer. Our editors have chosen 10 of the most inspirational stories of 2016. For many who are facing a cancer diagnosis, or any other illness or hardship, hearing from others who've been through one already can be a great source of comfort and support. We hope you will find inspiration in these stories of cancer survivors. &nb...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Coping with Cancer Source Type: news

Surgeon General Calls E-Cigarettes Dangerous to Young People
By Stacy Simon RESOURCES: Guide to Quitting SmokingECigarettes.Surgeongeneral.gov A new report from the US Surgeon General says e-cigarette use among youth and young adults has risen to the level of a public health concern. According to the report, electronic cigarette use has grown 900% among high school students from 2011 to 2015. In 2015, about 1 in 6 high school students used e-cigarettes in the past 30 days. The report is the first comprehensive federal review of the public health impact of e-cigarettes on American young people. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy said, “Nicotine-containing products in any form, incl...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 9, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Smoking/Tobacco Source Type: news

Study Confirms There Is No Safe Level of Smoking
By Stacy SimonPeople who smoke as little as 1 cigarette a day over their lifetime still have a greater risk of early death than people who have never smoked, according to a study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute. The researchers say this shows that no level of cigarette smoking is safe.The study included 290,215 adults ages 59 to 82 who answered questions about how many cigarettes they smoked during different periods throughout their lives. Researchers then followed the participants for an average 6.6 years. Results showed that people who consistently smoked an average of less than 1 cigarette per day had ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Smoking/Tobacco Source Type: news

Focus on Easy, Healthy Food This Holiday Season
The American Cancer Society New Healthy Eating Cookbook, Fourth EditionWritten by Jeanne BesserMost people want to eat healthier, feel good, and have more energy, but around the hustle and bustle of the holidays, staying on track with healthy eating can be a real challenge. The trick is to find tasty, easy, and good-for-you recipes and to keep up with small changes for the better that can make a big impact. With an abundance of useful tips and healthy dishes, The American Cancer Society New Healthy Eating Cookbook, Fourth Edition, is here to help people do just that, both during the holidays and throughout the year.The boo...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

US Bans Smoking in Public Housing
By Stacy Simon RESOURCES: How to Quit Smoking The US government is making public housing smoke-free. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Julian Castro announced that all public housing developments will be required to implement smoke-free policies within the next 18 months. The ban includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, and hookahs in all living units, indoor common areas, administrative offices, and within 25 feet of all buildings. More than 2 million people, including 760,000 children, live in more than 3,100 public housing developments in the United States. This new rule is intended to protect people from the h...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Smoking/Tobacco Source Type: news

Health-related Gifts for Every Budget
By Becky Slemons This year, consider giving gifts that support healthy fitness and eating goals.Healthy habits lower the risk for cancer and other chronic health conditions.This year, give gifts that show you really care. Ideas for a tight budget: RESOURCES: Sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter and receive lifestyle tips each month to stay well and help lower your cancer risk. Arm band to hold a phone Sweat-resistant ear buds Yoga mat and DVD Gift basket of whole-wheat pasta, olive oil, tuna, and other items from our list of how to stock a healthy kitchen New gym bag Hand weights Water bottles and a running ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 30, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

Bake Lighter Versions of Your Own Recipes
By Stacy SimonThe holidays can be a tough time to stick to healthy eating goals. But if your traditions involve baking, a few simple ingredient changes can help you cut some of the sugar, fat, and calories – without sacrificing the taste. This year, make some new baking traditions by adapting your family recipes with these tips:Substitute whole-wheat flour for up to half of the white flour called for in the recipe.Make muffins using oatmeal, bran, or whole-wheat flour.Reduce the fat by ¼ (if a recipe calls for 1 cup of oil, use ¾ cup). You can also reduce the sugar by ¼.If making sweet breads, su...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

Research Under Way for Lung Cancer Dream Team
(Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features)
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 19, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How to Quit Smoking
By Stacy Simon Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the United States. Since the release of the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health 50 years ago, there have been 20 million deaths due to tobacco. Almost half the deaths from 12 different types of cancer combined – including lung, voice box, throat, esophagus, and bladder cancers – are attributable to cigarette smoking alone. In addition to cancer, smoking greatly increases the risk of debilitating long-term lung diseases like emphysema and chronic bronchitis. It also raises the risk for heart...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 16, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Smoking/Tobacco Source Type: news

An Essential Guide for Cancer Caregivers
The American Cancer Society Complete Guide to Family Caregiving, Second EditionEdited by Julia A. Bucher, Peter S. Houts, and Terri AdesCaring for someone with cancer comes with a unique set of challenges. Caregivers may handle a loved one’s physical needs, medical needs, practical needs, and emotional needs – all while learning on the job. Having a reliable and respected source for help is critical in order for a caregiver to deliver the very best support they can. That’s why the American Cancer Society created The American Cancer Society Complete Guide to Family Caregiving, now in its second edition.Wri...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Caregiving Source Type: news

CDC: 40% of Cancer Cases in US Might Be Linked to Tobacco
By Stacy Simon New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that 40% of cancers diagnosed in the US may have a link to tobacco use. The report was published in the November 11, 2016 issue of Vital Signs. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of cancer and cancer deaths. It can cause cancer of the liver, colon and rectum, lung, oral cavity, esophagus, pharynx (throat), larynx (voice box), stomach, pancreas, bladder, kidney, and cervix, and acute myeloid leukemia. According to the CDC, about 660,000 people in the US were diagnosed each year between 2009 and 2013 with a cancer related to toba...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 11, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Smoking/Tobacco Source Type: news

How to Test Your Home for Radon
By Stacy Simon When it comes to reducing your cancer risk, one important step could be right under your nose, or below your feet. Getting your home tested for radon can help protect you and your family from a key cause of lung cancer. Exposure to radon accounts for about 21,000 deaths from lung cancer each year according to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While that is nowhere near the 480,000 deaths a year caused by smoking, it’s still significant. And it’s the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers. What is radon? RADON HOTLINES: 1-800-SOS-RADON Purchase radon test kits 1-800-55RADON Live...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 11, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer Risks/Causes Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell Source Type: news

Junk DNA Research Leads to Lung Cancer Discovery
(Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features)
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Why Non-smokers Sometimes Get Lung Cancer
By Stacy Simon As many as 20% of the people who die from lung cancer in the United States every year do not smoke or use any other form of tobacco. This translates to about 16,000 to 24,000 Americans every year. In fact, if lung cancer in non-smokers had its own separate category, it would rank among the top 10 fatal cancers in the United States. It’s still true that staying away from tobacco is the most important thing any of us can do to lower our risk of getting lung cancer. But there are also other risk factors. Researchers have made a lot of progress over the past decade in understanding what causes lung cancer ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

New Website to Help Cancer Survivors Manage Health
By Stacy SimonThe American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute have launched an easy-to-use website to help cancer survivors during and after cancer treatment. Springboard Beyond Cancer provides survivors with online tools to manage side effects from cancer treatment, cope with stress, improve healthy behaviors, communicate better with their health care teams, and ask for support from family and friends.“With Springboard Beyond Cancer, we want to empower cancer survivors by giving them the information they need to help identify issues, set goals, and create a plan to more smoothly navigate the cancer jou...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Coping with Cancer Source Type: news

Exercise Can Improve Breast Cancer Survivors’ Quality of Life
By Stacy Simon Exercise is not only safe and possible during and after breast cancer treatment, but it also can reduce symptoms and improve quality of life. Despite these benefits, a lot of women don't get any regular physical activity beyond their usual daily activities. Studies of breast cancer survivors have shown that regular exercise significantly improves physical functioning and reduces fatigue. Certain kinds of exercise appear to help breast cancer survivors at high risk for arm, breast and chest swelling (lymphedema) avoid the condition. And some types of exercise can improve symptoms for those who already ha...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Coping with Cancer Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

CDC: Younger Patients Can Get Just 2 Doses of HPV Vaccine
By Stacy SimonThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has revised its recommendation for the HPV vaccination for ages 9 through 14. Children in that age group can now get just 2 shots instead of 3. The shots can be given at least 6 months apart. The CDC continues to recommend that most children get the vaccine at age 11 or 12.Debbie Saslow, PhD, senior director, HPV Related and Women’s Cancers at the American Cancer Society, said the new recommendation will make it easier for people to get protection from HPV. “It’s a burden on parents to get teenagers to the provider’s office. The new ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 20, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cervical Cancer Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

FDA Approves Lartruvo for Soft Tissue Sarcoma
By Stacy SimonThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Lartruvo (olaratumab) for advanced soft tissue sarcoma. It’s for people with the disease who are not good candidates for radiation or surgery. The new drug is to be used in combination with the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin.Soft tissue sarcomas are cancers that develop in muscles, fat, tendons, or other soft tissues anywhere in the body. There are not many treatment options available for this type of cancer; therefore, a new drug approval is a significant development.Lartruvo is a monoclonal antibody, which is a manmade version of an immune system p...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 20, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Sarcoma - Adult Soft Tissue Cancer Source Type: news

Simple Answers to Breast Cancer Questions for the Newly Diagnosed
Breast Cancer Clear & Simple, Second Edition: All Your Questions AnsweredFrom the Experts at the American Cancer SocietyEven though advancements in screening and treatment are making a difference in the fight against breast cancer, 246,660 women in the United States are expected to be diagnosed with the disease this year. For those who must face breast cancer, having a trusted, easy-to-read source for answers can be an invaluable way to feel more informed, more in control, and more prepared as they move forward with life and with treatment. The book Breast Cancer Clear & Simple, Second Edition, is designed to be ju...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 11, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

NFL Helps American Cancer Society Fight Breast Cancer
Professional football and the color pink go together during October, National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Each October, the National Football League joins the American Cancer Society to raise awareness about the importance of regular breast exams and to raise money to help fight breast cancer. Since 2009, the American Cancer Society has partnered with the NFL, its franchise clubs, players, and the NFL Players Association on “A Crucial Catch,” a breast cancer awareness initiative that conveys an important public health message promoting early detection and the importance of breast cancer screening, and addres...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 4, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Cut Down on Sugar This Halloween
By Stacy SimonFor the past 30 years, Americans have been sweetening their diets with more and more sugar. These days, we each consume an average 20 teaspoons of sugar a day – most of it from soda and other soft drinks, candy, desserts, and sweetened dairy products – according to the American Heart Association (AHA).The AHA recommends no more than 5 teaspoons of sugar a day for women and 9 for men on average. Children under age 2 should have no food or drinks sweetened with sugar. Children and teens up to 18 should be limited to 6 teaspoons of added sugars per day and limited to no more than 8 ounces per week of...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 4, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

New ACS Cookbook Offers Tasty, Good-For-You Recipes
With 120 all-new recipes including Mini Twice-Baked Potatoes, Chicken Paillard with Arugula and Fennel, and Corn, Avocado, and Tomato Salad, The New Healthy Eating Cookbook, Fourth Edition can help home cooks and their families eat better without sacrificing flavor or taste. The recipes were reviewed by the American Cancer Society’s medical and nutrition experts and emphasize fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein. The New Healthy Eating Cookbook also includes tips on portion control, meal planning, healthy snacking, and reading nutrition labels. “Good health starts with good nutrition, and...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

Five Ways to Reduce Your Breast Cancer Risk
By Stacy Simon While you can’t change some breast cancer risk factors—family history and aging, for example—there are some risk factors that you can control. And while there is no sure way to prevent breast cancer, there are things you can do that may lower your risk. Here are 5 ways to help protect your breast health. 1. Watch your weight. Being overweight or obese increases breast cancer risk. This is especially true after menopause and for women who gain weight as adults. After menopause, most of your estrogen comes from fat tissue. Having more fat tissue can increase your chance of getting breast canc...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

How Your Diet May Affect Your Risk of Breast Cancer
By Stacy SimonHave you ever said “no thanks” to a tempting dessert or eaten only salad for lunch because you were trying to cut back? If so, you’re among many women who try every day to protect their health by eating right. The American Cancer Society recommends eating mostly vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, and less red meat (beef, pork, and lamb), less processed meat (bacon, sausage, luncheon meats, and hot dogs), and fewer sweets. A healthy diet can help reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and certain cancer types.A healthy diet can also help you get to and stay at a healthy weight...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 30, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Diet/Exercise/Weight Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

Breast Cancer Symptoms: What You Need to Know
By Stacy Simon An important way to keep up with your breast health is to be aware of how your breasts normally look and feel, and know what changes to look for. Finding breast cancer as early as possible gives you a better chance of successful treatment. But knowing what to look for is not a substitute for screening mammograms and other tests, which can help find breast cancer in its early stages, even before any symptoms appear. Benign (non-cancerous) breast conditions are much more common than breast cancer, but it is important to let your health care team know about any changes in your breast so they can be checked out ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 30, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

What You Need to Know About Getting a Mammogram
By Stacy Simon A mammogram is an important step in taking care of yourself and your breasts. A mammogram is a low-dose x-ray that allows specialists to look for changes in breast tissue that aren’t normal. The American Cancer Society recommends that starting at age 40 women at average risk should have the choice to begin yearly mammograms. Women should begin yearly mammograms at age 45, and they can switch to every 2 years at age 55. And all women, no matter their age, need to let their doctor know about any changes to their breasts. Whether you’re a mammogram newbie or a veteran, knowing what to expect may hel...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 30, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

Get Moving to Help Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer
By Stacy Simon Engaging in regular exercise is good for you for many reasons, and one of them is to lower your risk of getting breast cancer. Many studies conducted over the past 20 years have shown that an increase in physical activity is linked to a lower breast cancer risk. The difference in risk between the most active and the least active women is typically around 25%. How exercising lowers breast cancer risk is not fully understood. It’s thought that physical activity regulates hormones including estrogen and insulin, which can fuel breast cancer growth. Regular exercise also helps women stay at a healthy weigh...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 30, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

How Your Weight Affects Your Risk of Breast Cancer
By Stacy SimonManaging weight is a challenge for most people in the US. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 70% of American adults are overweight.This puts them at higher risk for serious conditions including diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. For women, being overweight or obese after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer.The female hormone estrogen can help breast cancer grow. After menopause, most of your estrogen comes from fat tissue. Having more fat tissue can increase your chance of getting breast cancer by raising estrogen levels. Also, women...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 29, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

Five Ways to Fight Breast Cancer
Want to join the fight against breast cancer? Here are 5 ways to do a lot of good with a little – or a lot – of your time, your skills, and your voice. 1. Volunteer your time The American Cancer Society offers many programs that focus on the physical, social, and emotional needs of people facing breast cancer.RESOURCES: How the American Cancer Society Fights Breast Cancer Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Reach To Recovery® – If you have survived breast cancer, you can train to become a Reach To Recovery® volunteer who provides education and emotional support to other women – and...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 29, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Advocacy ACS Programs and Services Source Type: news

If You’re Called Back After a Mammogram
By Stacy Simon Most of the time, women getting their routine mammogram will receive a letter within 30 days saying the results were normal. But if doctors find something suspicious, they’ll call you back – usually within just 5 days – to take new pictures or get other tests.Getting that call can be scary, but a suspicious finding does not mean you have cancer. What else could it be? A suspicious finding may be just dense breast tissue, a cyst, or even a tumor that isn’t cancer. Other times, the image just isn’t clear and needs to be retaken. Or, if this is your first mammogram, your doctor may...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 29, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

Ovarian Cancer Researcher Aims to Find New Treatment
(Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features)
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 23, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Large Study Finds No Link Between Vasectomy and Prostate Cancer Risk
(Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features)
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers Look for Ways to Improve Communication Between Cancer Patients and Doctors
By Stacy SimonFrank, open discussions between cancer patients and their doctors is a key part of getting good care. Ideally, these discussions help patients make informed decisions by giving them a good understanding of what to expect from treatment and their chances for recovery (prognosis).But often, especially for patients who may be near the end of life, high quality conversations about quality of life, prognosis, and treatment choices happen either too late or not at all. And when they do happen, misunderstandings often occur that can lead patients to have unrealistic expectations and make treatment choices that they ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Advanced Cancer Source Type: news

CDC: Adults Aged 50 and Older Need More Physical Activity
By Stacy SimonMore than 1 in 4 Americans ages 50 and older get no physical activity beyond their normal daily routine, according to a new report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That’s about 31 million people.According to the CDC, regular physical activity is vital for healthy aging. It can reduce the risk of early death and help prevent, delay, or manage many chronic diseases faced by adults ages 50 and older. These include stroke, heart disease, arthritis, some types of cancer, diabetes, lung disease (COPD), and depression. In 2014, the CDC says 2 in 3 adults ages 50 and older had at le...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 16, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

Study Compares Surgery, Radiation, and Active Monitoring to Treat Prostate Cancer
This study will help inform that discussion for men making what is a highly personal, and often difficult choice,” said Brawley.The study involved about 1,600 men in the United Kingdom aged 50 to 69 who were diagnosed with prostate cancer after having an elevated PSA test result. The men were assigned randomly to get surgery to remove their prostate, external-beam radiation, or active monitoring.While the results showed no difference in death from prostate cancer among the groups after 10 years of monitoring, it remains to be seen whether differences will show up after a longer follow-up period. This could be especia...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 16, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Feelings Book Helps Kids Cope with Cancer
My Cancer DaysBy Courtney FiligenziIllustrated by Nicole TadgellEstimates show that in 2016, more than 10,000 children in the United States under the age of 15 will be diagnosed with cancer. That means thousands of patients and families will face the physical and emotional challenges that come when cancer impacts a young child.To help support and encourage people touched by childhood cancer, especially during Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in September, the American Cancer Society offers an excerpt of My Cancer Days, a book that helps kids explore the emotional ups and downs of daily life during treatment. Appropriate fo...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Childhood Cancer Source Type: news

Can Coffee Lower Cancer Risk?
By Stacy Simon Most Americans drink at least 1 cup of coffee a day, and many feel like they can’t face the morning without it. So wouldn’t it be great if our beloved beverage helped protect us from cancer? There is, in fact, some reason to believe it could. Coffee is brewed from beans that contain antioxidants, which are thought to have a protective effect against cancer. Researchers have conducted more than 1,000 studies looking at this question, with mixed results. Some early studies seemed to show that coffee might increase risk of some cancer types. Since then, however, larger and better designed studies ha...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 14, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

The Rare Gift Making a Major Impact in Childhood Cancer Research
(Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features)
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 14, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA Warns Against Ovarian Cancer Screening Tests
By Stacy SimonThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is alerting women and their medical care providers to the risks of using tests that are marketed as screening tests for ovarian cancer. The FDA says these tests should not be used because they have a high number of false results.Screening tests look for cancer in people who don’t have any symptoms. For some cancer types, screening tests are available that can find cancer early, when it’s easier to treat. Some tests can even find growths and remove them before they have a chance to turn into cancer. But there are no reliable screening tests yet that can fin...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 9, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Ovarian Cancer Source Type: news

How Family History Affects Prostate Cancer Risk
By Stacy Simon RESOURCES: Prostate cancer prevention and early detectionProstate cancer screening FAQ It has long been known that men with a family history of prostate cancer are at higher risk of getting it themselves. Now researchers from Sweden have calculated just how much having a brother or father with prostate cancer – or both – raises the risk. They also figured out how likely it is that a man with a family history will get a mild or aggressive (fast-growing) type of the disease. The authors suggest their findings can be useful in counseling men who have prostate cancer in the family. Having more info...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Take a Loved One for a Checkup
By Stacy Simon The third Tuesday of every September is Take a Loved One for a Checkup Day. It’s a reminder to help a friend, neighbor, or family member visit a health care professional. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, many people wait until they have an emergency before going to the doctor. But regular visits to a medical professional can help prevent diseases from occurring or catch them early when they’re easier to treat. If you know someone you think could benefit from a medical visit, or you are already a caregiver for someone else, ask if they’d like you to go with them t...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 6, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Caregiving Source Type: news

Say Yes to Yoga
By Stacy SimonThe ancient Indian practice of yoga combines meditation, breathing, and precise postures and poses to make a connection with thoughts, body, and spirit. People who practice yoga claim it leads to a state of physical health, relaxation, happiness, peace, and tranquility.Some evidence shows that yoga can lower stress, increase strength, and lessen lower back pain, while providing exercise. And according to a report from the National Institutes of Health, there is also some evidence to suggest yoga may be helpful when used alongside conventional medical treatment to help relieve some of the symptoms linked to ca...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Complementary and Alternative Methods Source Type: news

Another Promising Neuroblastoma Discovery
(Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features)
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - September 1, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news