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First time flu infection may affect lifetime immunity
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no protection w...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

CDC reports variant of swine flu not seen previously in people
A?Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC)?report released yesterday says 18 people in Michigan and Ohio fell ill after an outbreak of Influenza A(H3N2) Variant Virus that had not seen previously in people. Health officials linked the infections to swine exhibits at agricultural fairs. All 18 people have since recovered. Dr. Gregory Poland, director of [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 28, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

One Health - Animal. Human. Environment.
One Health is a partnership between the USDA, FDA, CDC, NIH, FWS, and tribal Nations to maintain or reduce health risks to animals, humans, the environment, and society. The information portal ' s focus is antimicrobial resistance, avian influenza, and swine influenza. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - September 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

H1N1 'Swine Flu' vaccine unlikely to raise birth defect risk
HealthDay News Swedish researchers report that the vaccine against the H1N1 " swine flu " strain of influenza doesn't seem to have a link to birth defects. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H1N1 ' Swine Flu ' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk
MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 -- Swedish researchers report that the vaccine against the H1N1 " swine flu " strain of influenza doesn ' t seem to have a link to birth defects. One obstetrician who reviewed the research said the findings should ease concerns... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 19, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

2009 Swine Flu Originated in Mexico
Genetic analysis pinpoints source of the pandemic influenza that killed 17,000 people Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers discover the 2009 swine flu pandemic originated in Mexico
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) The 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic -- responsible for more than 17,000 deaths worldwide -- originated in pigs from a very small region in central Mexico, a research team headed by investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is reporting.The scientists say their findings, published in the journal eLife, represent the first time that the origin of an influenza pandemic virus has been determined in such detail. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Well: Flu Shots Protect Babies, Too
Here’s one more reason pregnant women should get a flu shot: It not only protects mothers, but a large study suggests it prevents flu in the infant, too. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - May 3, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Epidemics Influenza Pregnancy and Childbirth Swine Influenza Vaccination and Immunization Women and Girls Family Featured Parenting Source Type: news

The Zika Virus Lesson? A New Approach Is Needed to Combat Pandemics
The Zika virus attracted many headlines this winter, but a recent admission by the chief medical officer at a leading vaccine manufacturer -- that the world is ill-prepared to deal with pandemic outbreaks -- underscores a fundamental problem. To ensure safety and efficacy, the federal government's regulatory approval process for new vaccines may extend development timelines for years. So when The New York Times reports that "eighteen organizations are working on developing a vaccine for the Zika virus," it is likely that those companies will labor for a very long time. Vaccinations rightly require strict federal approva...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Developing ways to study influenza D virus
Researchers have found antibodies to the newly discovered influenza D virus in pigs, cattle, horses, goats and sheep, but not poultry. A researcher has proven that the guinea pig can be used as an animal model and is developing a way to study the virus in living cells—trachea and lung epithelial cells from swine and cattle. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Three in hospital with influenza strain responsible for swine flu
Two other cases suspected in Wexford hospital, as HSE says H1N1 virus is circulating (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - January 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two in hospital with influenza strain responsible for swine flu
Patients being treated at Wexford hospital, HSE says H1N1 strain is circulating this year (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - January 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two patients in hospital in Scotland after contracting SWINE FLU
The patients, who have been diagnosed with the H1N1 strain of influenza, are being kept under observation at Wishaw General Hospital in North Lanarkshire, hospital officials confirmed today. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

World Briefing: Iran: Deadly Swine Flu Outbreak Is Likely to Spread, Official Warns
At least 33 people have died from a swine flu virus outbreak in two provinces of southwestern Iran in the past three weeks. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICK GLADSTONE Tags: Epidemics Iran Swine Influenza Source Type: news

Influenza Virus Surveillance in US Swine Production SystemsInfluenza Virus Surveillance in US Swine Production Systems
This study investigates the prevalence of influenza A viruses in coordinated swine production systems in the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Swine flu vaccine far more dangerous than swine flu itself
(NaturalNews) A closer look at the overall infection and death rate from confirmed cases of H1N1 influenza during the 2009–2010 "pandemic," as declared by the World Health Organization (WHO), has revealed that the widely administered vaccine for swine flu is far more deadly... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Take Huge Step Toward Universal Flu Vaccine
A universal flu vaccine -- one that provides immunity against every strain of the influenza virus for multiple years -- is the holy grail of flu research. It would be a medical breakthrough on the order of penicillin, with the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. And scientists just got one crucial step closer to making it a reality. Two separate groups of scientists published papers this week demonstrating that a new type of flu vaccine can provide protection against multiple strains of the disease, rather than just one. Though a truly universal flu vaccine that could be given to humans remain...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists Take Huge Step Toward Universal Flu Vaccine
A universal flu vaccine -- one that provides immunity against every strain of the influenza virus for multiple years -- is the holy grail of flu research. It would be a medical breakthrough on the order of penicillin, with the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. And scientists just got one crucial step closer to making it a reality. Two separate groups of scientists published papers this week demonstrating that a new type of flu vaccine can provide protection against multiple strains of the disease, rather than just one. Though a truly universal flu vaccine that could be given to humans remain...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers 'a step closer' to universal flu vaccine
Conclusion These studies have developed two different flu vaccines that could potentially offer broader protection against a variety of flu strains than current vaccines. As yet, this research has only been conducted in animals, with one study showing an effect against different flu strains in mice and monkeys, and the other showing an effect in mice and ferrets. As monkeys are more similar to humans than mice or ferrets, the results from these experiments are likely to be the most representative of what would happen in humans. While the results are encouraging, it is likely that additional lab and animal research on bo...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Heart/lungs Swine flu Source Type: news

Four out of ten Brits may naturally show fewer flu symptoms
ConclusionA study of 1,414 unvaccinated people showed those with T cells targeting virus nucleoprotein still got infected by flu, but had fewer symptoms. The logic is that people with fewer symptoms are less likely to spread the virus through coughs and sneezes, which may slow the spread of both seasonal and pandemic flu strains.This is plausible, but was not directly tested in this study, so we don't know if it's true in real life. The research team suggested vaccines that boost T cell numbers might be worth exploring, as an alternative to those that try to stop virus infection altogether. An added potential benefit of th...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Medication Swine flu Source Type: news

Studies on flu like H1NI led to information on homoeopathic medicines: Government
Studies on influenza like H1N1 during swine flu pandemic in 2009 has resulted in identification of specific homoeopathic medicines, LS was informed. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - March 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Swine flu outbreak in India raises concern: New strain of H1N1 may carry dangerous mutations
Since December, an outbreak of swine flu in India has killed more than 1,200 people, and a new study suggests that the strain has acquired mutations that make it more dangerous than previously circulating strains of H1N1 influenza. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers monitor for next novel influenza strain
While flu season starts to die down, researchers are diligently monitoring for the next novel influenza virus by monitoring swine influenza viruses. The work is starting with swine in the field. Researchers are surveying for swine influenza viruses as part of a $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 3, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

World Briefing: India: Swine Flu Prompts City’s Caution
A west Indian city has banned most public gatherings in an attempt to halt the spread of swine flu, which has claimed at least 926 lives nationwide in 11 weeks. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Tags: India Influenza Swine Influenza Source Type: news

Airport screening for viruses misses half of infected travelers but can be improved, says UCLA-led study
In the past decade, the H1N1 virus and Ebola are just two of the diseases whose spread was spurred by international airline travel. Screening passengers at airports, therefore, could be one key method for slowing the global spread of infectious diseases. And although a team lead by UCLA researchers has found that airport screening misses at least half of infected travelers, the scientists say that rate could be improved. Their research was published in eLife, a highly regarded open-access online science journal. The life scientists used a mathematical model to analyze screening for six viruses: the SARS coronavirus, the Eb...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 25, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Swine flu: WHO 'carefully watching' situation in India
A senior WHO official said the seasonal influenza was quite normal at this time of the year and that its India office was closely working with the govt for dealing with the disease. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - February 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

India Deploys Expert Teams to Study Rise in Flu Cases
Officials are trying to determine the extent of illness, which has caused 700 deaths since the beginning of the year. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By ELLEN BARRY and HARI KUMAR Tags: India Epidemics Influenza Deaths (Fatalities) Swine Influenza World Health Organization Source Type: news

Medicos asked to adhere to Standard Universal Precautions on swine flu
Delhi government directed all 25 designated hospitals to strictly adhere to the Standard Universal Precautions while dealing with H1N1 influenza patients. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - January 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could brain protein help people 'sleep off' the flu?
Conclusion This complex study suggests the AcPb protein is playing a role in regulating normal sleep and the response to flu infection in mice. At this stage, the implications of this research for humans are unclear, as differences between the species may mean the results would not be exactly the same in humans. While The Telegraph suggests this "could finally lead to an effective treatment for the [flu], which until now has eluded experts", we are a long way off knowing whether this is the case. What the researchers have shown – in mice – is if you remove this protein, mice don't fight the virus as we...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Medication Heart/lungs Swine flu Source Type: news

Media, M.D.
After almost two months of screaming newspaper headlines and wall-to-wall cable television coverage about the Ebola outbreak, a calm descended over the media in late October. On Oct. 30, the Washington Post's front page carried the headline, "New Cases of Ebola Declining, WHO Says." The next day, the same real estate carried stories about the war in Syria and the CEO of Apple, Inc. Over the same two days, Ebola was nowhere to be found on the front page of the New York Times. It was 23 days after the death of Thomas Eric Duncan, the first and only confirmed Ebola fatality in the United States. Barring another victim arri...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

An Epidemic: Top 10 Outbreaks In U.S. History
Throughout the years, epidemics and plagues have shaken up societies and cultures around the world. The latest outbreak that Americans seem to be concerned about is the Ebola epidemic occurring in the African countries of Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.  With experts and doctors saying that the outbreak has the potential to become a full-blown pandemic that will become increasingly more difficult to control, the general public is scared. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continuously keep an eye on public health and any immediate health dangers, the American public still worries about how muc...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: cbskapost Tags: Health Africa avian flu Ebola Guinea Health Scare History Measles Nigeria Source Type: news

New analysis of 'swine flu' pandemic conflicts with accepted views on how diseases spread
(University of Cambridge) New analysis of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in the US shows that the pandemic wave was surprisingly slow, and that its spread was likely accelerated by school-age children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 1, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

RNA Extraction from Swine Samples and Detection of Influenza A Virus in Swine by Real-Time RT-PCR
Real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays are currently the method of choice in many laboratories for the detection and subtyping of influenza A virus (IAV) in swine. Traditionally, nasal swabs and lung tissues (sometimes broncho-alveolar lavage and tracheal tissues) are the primary specimens for IAV testing. However, oral fluids are becoming more common for IAV prognostic profiling. In this chapter, we describe (1) procedures of RNA extraction from the common clinical specimens, (2) two rRT-PCR assays for detection of IAV in swine, and (3) an rRT-PCR assay for subtyping swine IAV. RNA extraction procedures include a magnetic bead...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hemagglutinin Inhibition Assay with Swine Sera
Hemagglutination is based on the ability of viruses such as influenza A virus to agglutinate red blood cells (RBCs) of specific animal species by formation of cross-linking lattices between RBCs. Antibodies that have the ability to inhibit the hemagglutination property of influenza A viruses are correlated with protection from infection. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is a serological assay that measures the titer of specific antibodies in the sera and is the most common serological assay used to detect anti-influenza antibodies in swine sera. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Serum or Mucosal Isotype-Specific IgG and IgA Whole-Virus Antibody to Influenza A Virus in Swine
Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays can be used to detect isotype-specific anti-influenza antibodies in biological samples to characterize the porcine immune response to influenza A virus. The isotype antibody assay is based on an indirect ELISA using whole influenza virus as antigen and detection antibodies directed against porcine IgG and IgA. Samples such as serum, nasal wash, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid allow for evaluation of systemic, upper, and lower respiratory tract mucosal antibody responses, respectively. The isotype ELISA assay is performed in a 96-well format using anti-swine detection antibodies conjugate...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A Brief Introduction to Influenza A Virus in Swine
Influenza A viruses (IAV) of the Orthomyxoviridae virus family cause one of the most important respiratory diseases in pigs as well as humans. Repeated outbreaks and rapid spread of genetically and antigenically distinct IAVs represent a considerable challenge for animal production and public health. This overlap between human and animal health is a prime example of the “One Health” concept. Although only subtypes of H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 are endemic in swine around the world, considerable diversity can be found not only in the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes, but in the other 6 genes as well. Hu...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Sample Types, Collection, and Transport for Influenza A Viruses of Swine
Detection of influenza A virus (IAV), viral antigen, nucleic acid, or antibodies in swine is dependent upon the collection of the appropriate sample type, the quality of the sample, and the proper storage and handling of the sample. The diagnostic tests to be performed should be considered prior to sample collection. Sera are acceptable samples for ELISA or hemagglutination inhibition tests, but not for real-time RT-PCR. Likewise, swabs and/or tissues are acceptable for real-time RT-PCR and virus isolation. The sample type will also depend on the age of swine that are being tested; oral fluids can be successfully collected...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Isolation of Swine Influenza Virus in Cell Cultures and Embryonated Chicken Eggs
Influenza virus isolation is a procedure to obtain a live and infectious virus that can be used for antigenic characterization, pathogenesis investigation, and vaccine production. Embryonated chicken egg inoculation is traditionally considered the “gold standard” method for influenza virus isolation and propagation. However, many primary cells and continuous cell lines have also been examined or developed for influenza virus isolation and replication. Specifically, swine influenza virus (SIV) isolation and propagation have been attempted and compared in embryonated chicken eggs, some primary porcine cells, and ...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Avian Influenza Virus Isolation, Propagation, and Titration in Embryonated Chicken Eggs
Avian influenza virus and some mammalian influenza A viruses are usually isolated, propagated, and titrated in embryonated chicken eggs (ECE). Most any sample type can be accommodated for culture with appropriate processing. Isolation may also be accomplished in cell culture particularly if mammalian lineage isolates are suspected, for example, swine influenza in turkey specimens. Culture is highly sensitive, but is not specific for influenza A, which may be an advantage because a sample may be screened for several agents at once. Once an agent is isolated in culture, the presence of influenza viruses is confirmed with any...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tamiflu: drugs given for swine flu 'were waste of £500m'
Drug Tamiflu does nothing to halt the spread of influenza and Government wasted nearly £500?million stockpiling it over swine flu pandemic, study finds (Source: The Telegraph : Swine Flu A H1N1)
Source: The Telegraph : Swine Flu A H1N1 - May 13, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: influenza drugs pandemic tamiflu swine flu Source Type: news

Solving the Mystery Flu That Killed 50 Million People
MoreCalifornia Bill Banning ‘Affluenza’ Defense Is Nixed7 Ebola Patients in Guinea Fight Off the Disease4 Diseases Making a Comeback Thanks to Anti-VaxxersYears ago the environmental historian Alfred Crosby was at Washington State University, where he was teaching at the time, when on a whim he decided to pick up an old almanac from 1917. (This is apparently the kind of thing historians like to do in their spare time.) He looked up the U.S. life expectancy in that year—it was about 51 years. He turned to the 1919 almanac, and found about the same figure. Then Crosby picked up the almanac from 1918. The U.S. l...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 29, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized 1918 pandemic avian flu bird flu death rates H1N1 H5N1 H7N9 health immune system influenza Spanish flu Source Type: news

Effectiveness of Tamiflu and Relenza questioned
ConclusionThis major review is particularly significant for its use of unpublished, previously confidential data from both the drug manufacturers and regulators, to verify the information in published trials. As the researchers point out, much of the trial data is unreliable for various reasons, which makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions.While it appears that these drugs have a modest benefit, there is no solid evidence that either drug can protect people from the more serious complications of influenza. Paracetamol or ibuprofen would seem to be a far more cost-effective method of relieving the symptoms of influenza...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Swine flu Source Type: news

Three-quarters of people with flu have no symptoms
ConclusionThis large, community-based study found that most people with influenza in England don’t have symptoms, and even if they do, only a small proportion go to a doctor.Approximately 20% of people had an increase in antibodies against influenza in their blood after an influenza “season”. However, about three-quarters of infections were symptom-free, or so mild they weren't identified through weekly questioning about whether participants had a cough, cold, sore throat, or a “flu-like illness”.People who reported being ill were asked to take a nasal swab to test for the influenza virus. Among those with illnes...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Swine flu Medical practice Source Type: news

Strategies for developing new antiviral flu drugs
New analysis of the influenza A virus by scientists at the University of Hertfordshire shows potential for developing new anti-viral drugs which are more likely to be universally effective against the flu virus originating from avian, swine or human virus strains. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

New deadly strain of bird flu may have emerged
“Experts are concerned about the spread of a new strain of bird flu that has already killed one woman in China,” BBC News reports. The new strain, which has evolved from an existing bird flu virus called H10N8, has infected two people in China. A case report in The Lancet medical journal warns that potential for a new pandemic “should not be underestimated”. Their genetic tests of the strain suggests it has adapted to infect humans more easily.  That said, experts suggest there is currently no cause for alarm. There is no evidence that the new strain can pass between humans. Also, the woman who died of the ne...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Swine flu QA articles Medical practice Source Type: news

Researchers discover swine flu vaccine causes narcolepsy
A team of Swedish clinicians have clinically linked a 2009 swine flu vaccine to increased risk of narcolepsy in young adults, and a group of Danish researchers now understand how and why. Pandemrix, an influenza vaccine unleashed in 2009, was widely administered to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

L.A. hospitals gird for rise in flu cases
With statewide deaths outpacing last year's and being blamed in part on a 'swine flu' strain, L.A. facilities worry about its spread.Despite a statewide drop in reported influenza cases, Los Angeles hospitals are preparing for this year's season to worsen in the coming weeks, fearful of the deadly H1N1 "swine flu" virus strain that is to blame for most of this year's flu deaths. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 25, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Anti-swine flu vaccination linked to increased risk of narcolepsy in young adults
(Wiley) Pandemrix is an influenza vaccination, created in 2009 to combat H1N1, known as Swine Flu. Now, a team of Swedish clinicians testing the vaccine for links to immune-related or neurological diseases have linked Pandemrix to an increased risk of narcolepsy in young adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 21, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flu Activity Now Widespread In Mass.; H1N1 Dominant Strain
BOSTON (CBS/AP) –Flu season appears to be in full swing in Massachusetts, with health officials reporting cases statewide. Health care providers are seeing an uptick in the H1N1 strain that was prevalent in 2009. H1N1 or “Swine Flu” typically causes more illness in children and young adults, compared to older adults, although severe illness is possible in all age groups. The Center for Disease Control says hardest hit areas include Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania. Flu is usually the worst in January or February, although last year the illness hit the U.S. very hard in early December. According to...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kckatzman Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Syndicated Local CBS Boston flu season H1N1 Swine Flu WBZ Source Type: news