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This page shows you the latest news items in this category. This is page number 12.

Proteasome Inhibitors as Therapeutics of Autoimmune DiseasesProteasome Inhibitors as Therapeutics of Autoimmune Diseases
There may be a bright future for the use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Arthritis Research & Therapy (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology Journal Article Source Type: news

New national study finds autoimmune disease severely impacts patients
(Health Union) In a new national survey of rheumatoid arthritis patients, Health Union found a severe impact on quality of life, employment, and ability to afford treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Compound has potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis
A new study outlines a chemical compound with potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that affects an estimated 1.3 million people in the world. Characterized by stiff, swollen joints, it's a progressive disease that occurs when the body's immune system attacks its own cells. Inflammation in the lining of the joints leads to loss of bone and cartilage. People who have rheumatoid arthritis lose mobility and joint function without adequate treatment. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

NHLBI Media Availability: New form of interleukin-2 could be fine-tuned to fight disease
Finding shows potential benefit to transplantation and autoimmune disease. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - May 19, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Multiple sclerosis: Scientists ID cause of movement, balance problems
(University of Virginia Health System) New research into the causes of the excessive inflammation that drives multiple sclerosis has identified a faulty 'brake' within immune cells, a brake that should be controlling the inflammation. This points to a potential target for developing new therapies to treat multiple sclerosis and could have important implications for other autoimmune diseases, such as the colon disease colitis and the chronic skin condition atopic dermatitis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Your Mysterious Nerve Pain Could Be Undiagnosed Celiac Disease, According To New Study
People with celiac disease are more than twice as likely to suffer from nerve damage than the general population, according to a recently published study in the medical journal JAMA Neurology. The association is so strong that the study authors suggest people with nerve damage should also be screened for celiac disorder in order to pinpoint potential treatment options, according to lead researcher Jonas Ludvigsson of the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet. "The current guidelines suggest that patients with neuropathy [nerve pain] should be screened for type 1 diabetes and certain vitamin deficiencies,” L...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 15, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New insight into inflammatory bowel disease may lead to better treatments
A newly discovered link between bacteria and immune cells sheds light on inflammatory bowel disease, an autoimmune condition that affects 1.6 million people in the United States, according to researchers. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the most common forms of IBD, an autoimmune condition that is thought to develop based on genetic and environmental factors. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kineta expands as South Lake Union's biotech scene continues to grow
Yet another Seattle biotech company is growing. Kineta, which develops treatments for psoriasis, pain, viral and autoimmune diseases, has expanded into a new building right up the street from its existing space in Seattle's hottest tech and biotech neighborhood. The company expanded three weeks ago from its 10,000-square-foot South Lake Union office at 219 Terry Ave. N. and leased part of a floor at 401 Terry Ave. N. Kineta now occupies another 6,000 square feet at the new location, where nonprofit… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 13, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Annie Zak Source Type: news

The Unexpected Reason We Tend To Be Healthier In The Summer
By: Agata Blaszczak-Boxe Published: May 12, 2015 01:05pm ET on LiveScience. The activity of human genes changes with the seasons, and with it, immunity changes too, according to a new study. Seasonal changes in gene activity mean that the immune system revs up inflammation in the winter, researchers found. This may help explain why the symptoms of inflammation-related conditions — such as heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis — often worsen in winter, and why people tend to generally be healthier in the summer. "Our results indicate that, in the modern environment, the increase in the pro-inflammatory status of...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study finds seasons may affect immune system activity
ConclusionThis research found seasonal variations in gene expression in one type of white blood cell. Some genes became more active in the summer months, while others became more active in the winter. For example, one gene involved in the body's anti-inflammation response was increased during the summer, while some involved in inflammation were increased in the winter. The researchers also found seasonal variation in the numbers of each type of white cell. These patterns were different in samples taken from people in the UK, compared with people from The Gambia.Because of the observational nature of each study, it is not p...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

New insight into inflammatory bowel disease may lead to better treatments
(Washington University School of Medicine) A newly discovered link between bacteria and immune cells sheds light on inflammatory bowel disease, an autoimmune condition that affects 1.6 million people in the United States, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

National Briefing | Washington: F.D.A. Proposal Would End Ban on Blood Donation
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday released its proposal for scrapping a decades-old lifetime ban on blood donation by gay and bisexual men. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - May 13, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: SABRINA TAVERNISE Tags: Blood Donation Autoimmune Diseases Food and Drug Administration Homosexuality and Bisexuality Source Type: news

National Briefing | Washington: F.D.A. Proposal Would End Ban on Blood Donation
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday released its proposal for scrapping a decades-old lifetime ban on blood donation by gay and bisexual men. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SABRINA TAVERNISE Tags: Blood Donation Autoimmune Diseases Food and Drug Administration Homosexuality and Bisexuality Source Type: news

Trigger identified that likely unleashes autoimmune disease
Researchers believe they have discovered a group of cells that trigger autoimmune disease, as well as the molecular 'trigger guard' that normally holds them in check. These previously undetected cells are renegade versions of the cells that make the 'high affinity' antibodies required for long-term immunity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Welcome To My World, Dr. Oz
Dr. Oz and I must be doing something right – otherwise, we wouldn’t incur the wrath of the medical establishment, Big Pharma and Big Agra. Recently, 10 doctors lobbied Columbia University to oust celebrity physician Mehmet Oz from the distinguished university’s hospital and its department of health sciences and medicine. In a letter to the department’s dean of faculty, the doctors attacked him for presenting alternative and natural cures on his syndicated TV program, The Dr. Oz Show. They also chastised him for being concerned about genetically modified crops. Welcome to my world, Dr. Oz. Since graduati...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 12, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr. Al Sears Tags: Nutrition DHA Dr. Oz Show EPA omega 3 Source Type: news

A trigger that likely unleashes autoimmune disease
(Garvan Institute of Medical Research) Australian researchers believe they have discovered a group of cells that trigger autoimmune disease, as well as the molecular 'trigger guard' that normally holds them in check. These previously undetected cells are renegade versions of the cells that make the 'high affinity' antibodies required for long-term immunity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Infection clue points to causes of rheumatoid arthritis
ConclusionThrough a series of laboratory experiments, this research pinpointed a protein called vinculin as an important autoimmune target in rheumatoid arthritis.Much of the media reporting focused on the idea that being exposed to bacteria with the same target sequence as vinculin might sensitise someone to develop the disease later. The research team did discuss how infection might lower the threshold at which the T cells are activated to self-attack and might prime the immune system for self-attack. While this is plausible, it was not proved to be the case in this study, so this is largely speculative.This research fur...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Source Type: news

Discovery could help reverse glucocorticoid resistance in some young leukemia patients
Scientists have identified a mechanism that helps leukemia cells resist glucocorticoids, a finding that lays the foundation for more effective treatment of cancer and possibly a host of autoimmune diseases. The research focused on glucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormones. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Discovery could help reverse glucocorticoid resistance in some young leukemia patients
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a mechanism that helps leukemia cells resist glucocorticoids, a finding that lays the foundation for more effective treatment of cancer and possibly a host of autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

'Safe' low doses of mercury linked to autoimmune disease, children still injected!
(NaturalNews) When it comes to mercury contamination of seafood, scientists and environmentalists ring the alarm, warning consumers that eating too much fish can expose the body to toxic amounts of mercury.When it comes to mercury in vaccines, however, it's a much different story... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel Drug Ups Function in Patients With LEMS
(MedPage Today) -- Amifampridine phosphate slowed disease worsening in autoimmune neuromuscular disorder. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - April 27, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Potential new treatment for multiple sclerosis
Scientists have discovered a way to prevent the development of multiple sclerosis in mice. Using a drug that blocks the production of a certain type of immune cell linked to inflammation and autoimmunity, the researchers successfully protected against the onset of MS in an animal model of the disease. The scientists say the next step is to test this strategy using other autoimmune disorders. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Truth About Gluten
Health crazes and diet trends may come and go, but every so often there are advances in the nutrition and medical field that are true game changers. For decades, individuals diagnosed with celiac disease were simply characterized with ghastly gastrointestinal problems, but with further research, this multisystemic autoimmune disorder is now known to be caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, predominantly found in genetically-susceptible individuals. Gluten is the main storage protein of wheat, rye and barley. While gluten is mainly found in foods, shockingly it is even an ingredient in everyday products such as medicin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

RA Commercials... Really?
photo courtesy of morguefile.com http://www.thediaryofanalzheimerscaregiver.com I am sure you have seen them... they are on every 20 minutes it seems, those commercials for a new RA miracle drug. They usually star a woman running around doing everything from building playgrounds to cooking a 10-course meal for her family. RA is hard enough to deal with, people just don't understand it. They hear "arthritis" and you get, "Oh, I have that in my knee," or "My grandma had that," etc. Arthritis is one thing, Rheumatoid Arthritis is a whole other ballgame. I don't understand how the word "arthritis" even got in the name. Yes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New gene therapy success in a rare disease of the immune system
The efficacy of gene therapy treatment for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome has been demonstrated by researchers. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is a rare congenital immune and platelet deficiency which is X-linked and has an estimated prevalence of 1/250,000. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the WAS protein (WASp) expressed in hematopoietic cells. This disease, which primarily affects boys, causes bleeding, severe and recurrent infections, severe eczema and in some patients autoimmune reactions and the development of cancer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

In Search of Answers for Those Struggling With Infertility
Dr. Erin Wolff peers into a microscope in her lab at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Through the magnifying lens, she examines an egg from the ovary of one of her patients, a young woman with a rare autoimmune disease called GATA2 deficiency. The patient is about to undergo chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant, the only known treatment for her disease and one that will likely damage her ovaries, rendering her infertile. Dr. Wolff has extracted some of her eggs so that one day, through in vitro fertilization, the patient may have the chance to become a mother. "That is why I went into this line of medicin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Immune system protein regulates sensitivity to bitter taste
(Monell Chemical Senses Center) New research from the Monell Center reveals that tumor necrosis factor, an immune system regulatory protein that promotes inflammation, also helps regulate sensitivity to bitter taste. The finding may provide a mechanism to explain the taste system abnormalities and decreased food intake that can be associated with infections, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 21, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Childhood syndrome combining lung disease, arthritis identified
Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis. The hereditary disorder, which appears in early childhood, had never been diagnosed as a single syndrome. The new research revealed that it is caused by mutations in a single gene that disrupt how proteins are shuttled around within cells. Patients with the newly discovered syndrome have a poor prognosis, and at present can only be treated with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs. Many have lung disease so severe that they must receive lung tr...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Leaky gut syndrome, Candida, and autoimmune disease
(NaturalNews) Candida is not inherently bad, but when left unchecked, when it takes over the gut and is allowed to flourish, it will damage the intestinal wall. Then Candida, along with other microbes, will migrate outside of the intestinal tract and into the body, flourishing everywhere... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Generic Copaxone Approved for Multiple Sclerosis
Autoimmune disease affects central nervous systemSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Medicines, Multiple Sclerosis (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - April 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Morgellons Disease - A New Autoimmune Disease?
(NaturalNews) What is Morgellons Disease? There are several answers to this question. Ask the CDC or far too many conventional doctors and they will tell you Morgellons disease doesn't exist, that it is a psychosomatic disorder, most likely a combination of delusional parasitosis... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How To Live Smarter And Longer
The chances are you’re not getting enough of the right kind of fat in your diet. In fact, all of us are in the same boat, because it’s impossible to get enough of the kind of fat I’m talking about. As an anti-aging specialist, I make it a point to educate my patients about which nutrients will help them live a healthy, happy life for as long as possible. At the top of my list are the two of the most potent omega-3 fatty acids – eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, better known as EPA and DHA. These crucial omega-3 fats literally have the power to fend off old age. And they do it by resetting ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - April 10, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr. Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Brain Health antioxidants cholesterol energy heart heart disease omega-3s telomeres Source Type: news

The Health Benefits of Sweet vs. Regular Potatoes
Why do sweet potatoes get "superfood" status while regular potatoes are vilified? Here's why both tubers deserve a place on your plate. It's time to set the record straight on spuds. In recent years, and in certain "healthy eating" circles, the sweet potato has been crowned a "superfood" while the regular potato has been treated like the bad guy. High carb, high glycemic index, loaded with antinutrients? Is the plain old potato really so bad? Here's the real deal: Both regular potatoes and sweet potatoes deserve a place in your diet. You can eat both as part of a well-balanced, whole food diet and still have a lean ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study identifies protein that triggers lupus-associated immune system activation
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have found that a protein that regulates certain cells in the innate immune system -- the body's first line of defense against infection -- activates a molecular pathway known to be associated with the autoimmune disorder systemic lupus erythematosus and that the protein's activity is required for the development of lupus symptoms in a mouse model of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Autoimmune Diseases
WebMD explains what makes RA an autoimmune disease. Learn what autoimmune diseases are and how changes involving your immune system lead to RA. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Intestinal bacteria can be used to classify effects of different diseases
It is possible to quantify and classify the effects of different diseases on the activity of intestinal bacteria, new research demonstrates for the first time. Human intestinal flora, known as microbiota, can be considered as an additional organ in the body. It consists of millions of bacteria that interact with each other and with the body, thus affecting its functioning and health. It is known that many intestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and diseases such as obesity, cancer and autoimmune diseases can cause changes in the composition of gut bacteria. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 31, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Newly enlisted T-cell 'policemen' can slow down run-away immune system, scientist says
Researchers have discovered that potentially aggressive T-cells that might lead to auto-immune disease can instead be enlisted to help "police" over-active immune responses, via the molecule CD5. This new breakthrough may open the door to design better treatments for autoimmune diseases, they say. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Autoimmune Disease Risk Increased in Some WTC Rescue/Recovery WorkersAutoimmune Disease Risk Increased in Some WTC Rescue/Recovery Workers
Although the overall risk is low, the chance that a World Trade Center (WTC) rescue/recovery worker will develop systemic autoimmune disease (SAID) increases with duration of work at the site. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Rheumatology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Rheumatology Headlines - March 27, 2015 Category: Rheumatology Tags: Rheumatology News Source Type: news

Frequent antibiotic use linked to higher type 2 diabetes risk
Conclusion This large population-based study found a higher risk of diabetes in people taking between two and five courses of antibiotics over a year before diagnosis. This risk was even higher after more than five courses. Strengths of the study include its large sample size, direct relevance to the UK, and the accuracy of the data. Despite the strengths, the study does not prove that antibiotics cause diabetes, as its design cannot prove cause and effect. There are both plausible explanations for how antibiotic use may cause diabetes, and how the development of diabetes may cause more antibiotic use.  For example, pe...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Medication Source Type: news

Bristol-Myers Squibb Acquires License from Novo Nordisk
The license is for a discovery research program focused on autoimmune diseases (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - March 24, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Research On Appetite-Suppressing Bacteria Could Help Fight Obesity
Scientists already know that different kinds of gut bacteria -- those microbes inside our GI tracts that don't share our DNA yet are oh-so-integral to our health -- play crucial roles in breaking down our food, producing some vitamins and keeping harmful microbes at bay. For people struggling with excess weight and obesity, there is even more exciting emerging research on how gut bacteria may play a role in helping maintain our weight. And in that same vein, one researcher may have found a way to engineer a gut bacterium that helps suppress hunger pangs. Sean Davies of Vanderbilt University presented some tantalizing r...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

VIDEO: Ask vitiligo patients about autoimmune symptoms
SAN FRANCISCO – Thyroid disease is known to be more common in patients with vitiligo, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. In a review of 1,098 patients, researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit found... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - March 23, 2015 Category: Dermatology Tags: CEN Video Library FPN Video Library IMN Video Library RHEUM Video Library SAN Video Library Source Type: news

Research Into Wheat Variety For People With Celiac Disease Gains New Ground
WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — New research funded by farmers aims to breed a wheat variety for people who can't eat wheat and other grains, an endeavor that comes as wider consumer interest in gluten-free foods is booming. The Kansas Wheat Commission is spending $200,000 for the first two years of the project, which is meant to identify everything in wheat's DNA sequences that can trigger a reaction in people suffering from celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder in which eating even tiny amounts of gluten — comprised of numerous, complex proteins that gives dough its elasticity and some flavor to baked goods — can damage the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 23, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Profound, debiliating fatigue found to be a major issue for autoimmune disease patients in new national survey
Fatigue is a major component of autoimmune disease research team has found. Fatigue described as "profound," "debilitating," and "preventing them from doing the simplest everyday tasks," is a major issue for autoimmune disease (AD) patients, impacting nearly every aspect of their lives. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 23, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Blood test could provide an early arthritis warning
ConclusionThis laboratory study suggests that for people presenting with early joint symptoms, examining blood levels of a combination of proteins could help to distinguish people who have early-stage OA from those who have early-stage RA or other inflammatory arthritis.  However, this study is in the early stages and so far has only looked at relatively small samples of people with confirmed diagnoses of these different conditions. A lot of further work needs to be done to examine the accuracy of such a blood test, and to see whether it could reliably identify and distinguish between people with these conditions presenti...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Older people Source Type: news

'Ground Zero' Workers at Risk of Autoimmune Diseases: Study
Title: 'Ground Zero' Workers at Risk of Autoimmune Diseases: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/19/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/20/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Arthritis General)
Source: MedicineNet Arthritis General - March 20, 2015 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Eli Lilly and Hanmi to develop BTK inhibitor to treat autoimmune diseases
US-based Eli Lilly and Company has signed an exclusive licence and collaboration agreement with Hanmi Pharmaceutical to develop and commercialise an immunological therapy. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - March 20, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

'Ground Zero' Workers At Risk of Autoimmune Diseases
Prolonged exposure linked to rheumatoid arthritis, lupus Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Autoimmune Diseases, Occupational Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 10 most common environmental toxins to avoid and why
(NaturalNews) If you're suffering with chronic health conditions like fatigue, autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease or cancer, it's probably due to a toxic overload within your body. Yet, most conventionally-trained doctors know little about safe detoxification programs. Don't... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Autoimmunity Rising in 9/11 Workers (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Each month spent working at World Trace Center site tied to 13% increased risk developing autoimmune disease later. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - March 18, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news