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This page shows you the latest news items in this category. This is page number 8.

Rosacea linked to several autoimmune diseases in women
Rosacea in women is linked with an increased risk for a wide variety of autoimmune disorders including type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, according to a large population-based case-control study. The finding expands the association of rosacea and... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - April 13, 2016 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

Rosacea linked to several autoimmune diseases in women
Rosacea in women is linked with an increased risk for a wide variety of autoimmune disorders including type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, according to a... (Source: Clinical Neurology News)
Source: Clinical Neurology News - April 13, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Anti-fibrotic peptide shows early promise against interstitial lung disease
(Medical University of South Carolina) Investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina report preclinical findings showing that the M10 peptide reduces collagen production and reverses fibrotic damage due to systemic sclerosis (SSc)-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) in the April 2016 issue of Translational Research. ILD is one of the deadliest complications of SSc, a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by vasculopathy, autoimmunity, and excessive collagen production and deposition. Lung fibrosis carries a high risk of morbidity/mortality in SSc patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Mystery of the 13 people with 'superhero DNA'
Conclusion The researchers have presented some intriguing results, but their inability to contact the individuals identified in the study puts the results in question. As well as the explanation the researchers put forward, it's possible that the results are simply due to mistakes in the records. The researchers hoped to be able to identify conditions (genetic or environmental) which might protect an individual from a disease such as cystic fibrosis, which they are genetically programmed to develop. However, the current study does not even confirm that such individuals exist, never mind help us to understand possible cause...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Medical practice Source Type: news

Well: Ask Well: Why Is Arthritis More Common in Women Than Men?
More women than men get arthritis over all, but there are many types of arthritis, and some types are more common in men. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - April 12, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: RONI CARYN RABIN Tags: Ask Well Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Autoimmune Diseases Lupus Erythematosus Women and Girls Live Featured Aging Osteoarthritis Source Type: news

Well: Ask Well: Why Is Arthritis More Common in Women Than Men?
More women than men get arthritis over all, but there are many types of arthritis, and some types are more common in men. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RONI CARYN RABIN Tags: Ask Well Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Autoimmune Diseases Lupus Erythematosus Women and Girls Live Featured Aging Osteoarthritis Source Type: news

Well: Ask Well: Why Is Arthritis More Common in Women Than Men?
More women than men get arthritis over all, but there are many types of arthritis, and some types are more common in men. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - April 12, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: RONI CARYN RABIN Tags: Ask Well Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Autoimmune Diseases Lupus Erythematosus Women and Girls Live Featured Aging Osteoarthritis Source Type: news

Researchers find new clue in lupus autoantibody production
(Penn State) A signaling molecule called interferon gamma could hold the key to understanding how harmful autoantibodies form in lupus patients. The finding could lead to new treatments for the chronic autoimmune disease, said researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

When Education Is Met With Ire
Since receiving my celiac diagnosis just over three years ago, I've learned a lot along the way. I'm sure that if you're reading this and you have celiac disease that you too are learning something new with every step in your journey back to health. One thing that I have noticed, which I feel is unique to celiac disease sufferers, is that whenever I try and share my experiences, and what I have learned about my needs with regard to food, my statements are often met with anger, ire, or just completely dismissed. Because going gluten-free has become such a trend, many people are just so misinformed about what celiac disease...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Study Links Zika To Brain Disorder In Adults
CHICAGO (Reuters) - Scientists in Brazil have uncovered a new brain disorder associated with Zika infections in adults: an autoimmune syndrome called acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, or ADEM, that attacks the brain and spinal cord. Zika has already been linked with the autoimmune disorder Guillain-Barre syndrome, which attacks peripheral nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, causing temporary paralysis that can in some cases require patients to rely on respirators for breathing. The new discovery now shows Zika may provoke an immune attack on the central nervous system as well. The findings add to the growing list...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hacking Gut Bacteria Could Be The Future Of Medicine
The human gut microbiome -- which includes the community of trillions of bacteria living within our intestines -- has been called one of the next big frontiers in medicine.  In recent years, a growing body of research has shown that the bacteria in our gut exert a powerful influence on our immune and endocrine systems, brain health, mood and cognitive function, and other key biological processes. We know that the balance of good and bad bacteria in the gut can keep us healthy -- or can contribute to disease. Now, the next step for this exciting medical frontier is learning how to leverage the power of the microbi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hacking Gut Bacteria Could Be The Future Of Medicine
The human gut microbiome -- which includes the community of trillions of bacteria living within our intestines -- has been called one of the next big frontiers in medicine.  In recent years, a growing body of research has shown that the bacteria in our gut exert a powerful influence on our immune and endocrine systems, brain health, mood and cognitive function, and other key biological processes. We know that the balance of good and bad bacteria in the gut can keep us healthy -- or can contribute to disease. Now, the next step for this exciting medical frontier is learning how to leverage the power of the microbi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Zika linked to another brain disorder in new study
A new study suggests there may be a link between Zika virus and an autoimmune condition that affects the brain in a similar way to multiple sclerosis. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Zika virus may now be tied to another brain disease
The Zika virus may be associated with an autoimmune disorder that attacks the brain's myelin similar to multiple sclerosis, according to a small study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Zika virus may now be tied to another brain disease
(American Academy of Neurology) The Zika virus may be associated with an autoimmune disorder that attacks the brain's myelin similar to multiple sclerosis, according to a small study that is being released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 68th Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, April 15 to 21, 2016. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Future Challenges for Vaccinologists
Vaccination is one of the cheapest health-care interventions that have saved more lives than any other drugs or therapies. Due to successful immunization programs we rarely hear about some of the common diseases of the early twentieth century including small pox and polio. Vaccination programs have also helped to increase food production notably poultry, cattle, and milk production due to lower incidence of infectious diseases in farm animals. Though vaccination programs have eradicated several diseases and increased the quality of life there are several diseases that have no effective vaccines. Currently there are no vacc...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - April 8, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Principles of Vaccination
While many of the currently available vaccines have been developed empirically, with limited understanding on how they activate the immune system and elicit protective immunity, the recent progress in basic sciences like immunology, microbiology, genetics, and molecular biology has fostered our understanding on the interaction of microorganisms with the human immune system. In consequence, modern vaccine development strongly builds on the precise knowledge of the biology of microbial pathogens, their interaction with the human immune system, as well as their capacity to counteract and evade innate and adaptive immune mecha...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - April 8, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Perceptions and Misconceptions
I was in Rome, exhausted. My trip was stressful, being one month after a divorce and seven days without my daughter. All I wanted was to be back in the tiny arms of my four year old. I arrived at the airport on time, but groggy. I was confused by using Spanglish to navigate through Italy. I just wanted to go home. As I checked my bag, I was asked to wait. And wait. And wait. After about 30 minutes, I was met by a Italian woman with the airlines. She held my way home in her grip. I saw a thick black line on my ticket. She said she would ask me a few questions, and I thought I won the lucky random screening seat. "What was t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don't Resist This Starch
It has been called the skinny carb, resistant fiber, and resistant starch. Whatever you call it, research shows it can help you lose belly fat, feel full, lower your blood sugar, and increase your helpful bacteria. Why Does it Help? The more your blood sugar goes up and down, the more you gain weight and the more you are at risk for the complications of diabetes. Resistant starch helps stabilize your blood sugar more than any other known compound. In fact, it was first discovered in 1984 as an effective treatment for a fatal genetic disorder that causes unstable blood sugar, called glycogen storage disease. People with th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More complete genetic map of scleroderma disease makes more effective medications possible
Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease that affects one out of every 10,000 people in Europe and North America, mostly middle-aged women, and causes death in a high percentage of cases. Scientists have now carried out the largest study to date of the disease with a sample of more than 5000 affected patients. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Looking to crowd-sourcing to improve our understanding of fever
What, exactly, is a fever? It’s a surprisingly simple but important question in medicine. While a body temperature of 98.6°F (37°C) is generally considered “normal,” this number doesn’t account for temperature differences between individuals — and even within individuals at various times of the day. While a common sign of infection, fever can also occur with other medical conditions, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. “Many factors come together to set an individual’s ‘normal’ temperature, such as age, size, time of day and maybe even ancestry,” says Jared Hawkins, MMSc, PhD, the dir...
Source: Mass Device - April 8, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Study describes women’s autoimmune disease burden
Autoimmune diseases are widely thought to be much more prevalent in women, but data from Swedish national registers tell a somewhat different story. Of the four gastrointestinal conditions among the... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - April 7, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Sorrento Appoints Kevin M. Herde As Chief Financial Officer
SAN DIEGO, April 5, 2016 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc. (SRNE), an antibody-centric, clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing new treatments for cancer, inflammation and autoimmune diseases, today annou... Biopharmaceuticals, PersonnelSorrento Therapeutics, resiniferatoxin (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 6, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Immune cell transforms from 'Clark Kent' to 'Superman'
A previously unknown type of immune cell has been discovered by scientists, opening new avenues in the effort to develop novel therapies for autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The U.S. Needs New Strategies To Fight Zika Mosquitos
U.S. states and cities need to adopt a different mosquito-fighting strategy to battle the species carrying the Zika virus as an outbreak that started in Brazil heads north with warmer weather in the coming weeks, health officials said on Friday. The World Health Organization declared a global health emergency in February as the virus spread rapidly in the Americas, citing Zika's link to the birth defect microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome, an autoimmune disorder in adults that can cause paralysis. The mosquito species responsible for spreading the virus by biting people lives in and around homes, making traditional ev...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Things You Need To Know About Narcolepsy
Why are people with narcolepsy constantly subjected to the ridiculous statement, "I wish I could sleep that much?" Not like that, you don't. Narcolepsy is by no means fun or funny. Here are five things you should know about this sleep disorder. 1.  Narcolepsy is a serious disease. Narcolepsy is a neurological autoimmune sleep disorder. People with narcolepsy suffer from a variety of symptoms: extreme exhaustion, unregulated sleep-wake cycles, hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and others. When someone with narcolepsy abruptly falls asleep in public, it's known as a "sleep attack."  Before you laugh at the idea of someone b...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stop autoimmune disease - Functional medicine solutions
(NaturalNews) One of the first questions a patient is asked when seeking medical advice is, "What are your symptoms?" Unfortunately, when medical advice is sought from someone in conventional medicine, the treatment typically starts and ends with that question. But that failure to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Confirm Zika Virus Causes Microcephaly
By Stephanie Nebehay and Julie Steenhuysen GENEVA/CHICAGO (Reuters) - Researchers around the world are now convinced the Zika virus can cause the birth defect microcephaly as well as Guillain-Barre syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that can result in paralysis, the World Health Organization said on Thursday. The statement represented the U.N. health agency's strongest language to date on the connection between the mosquito-borne virus and the two maladies. The WHO also reported the first sign of a possible rise in microcephaly cases outside Brazil, the hardest-hit country so far in an outbreak spreading rapidly in Lat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Confirm Zika Virus Causes Microcephaly
By Stephanie Nebehay and Julie Steenhuysen GENEVA/CHICAGO (Reuters) - Researchers around the world are now convinced the Zika virus can cause the birth defect microcephaly as well as Guillain-Barre syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that can result in paralysis, the World Health Organization said on Thursday. The statement represented the U.N. health agency's strongest language to date on the connection between the mosquito-borne virus and the two maladies. The WHO also reported the first sign of a possible rise in microcephaly cases outside Brazil, the hardest-hit country so far in an outbreak spreading rapidly in Lat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

[Feature] Immunity goes local
Immunologists thought they knew the main players in our immune system. But they have become convinced that temporary immune command posts erected by the body, called tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) or tertiary lymphoid organs, are far more important to the body's defenses than previously realized. These organized congregations of immune tissue can sprout at sites of inflammation or infection almost anywhere in the body. They appear to instigate immune system counterattacks against pathogens and tumors—and may also promote the self-directed attacks of autoimmune diseases and the rejection of transplanted organs. These ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 31, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Mitch Leslie Source Type: news

[Perspective] A lncRNA links genomic variation with celiac disease
The majority of human single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased disease risk map to noncoding regions of the genome. The nucleotide variations therefore cannot be directly related to changes in the function of proteins. Indeed, SNPs frequently localize to DNA regulatory elements such as enhancers or promoters, or within intergenic regions that are transcribed to produce long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). LncRNAs are RNA molecules longer than 200 nucleotides that do not encode proteins; in many instances, they regulate gene expression through diverse mechanisms. On page 91 of this issue, Castellanos-Rubio...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 31, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Maite Huarte Tags: RNA Source Type: news

US researchers launch new initiative to advance cancer and autoimmune disease treatments
Cancer immunologists at the University of California (UC) Berkeley, in collaboration with Aduro Biotech, have launched a new initiative to accelerate breakthroughs in the treatment and prevention of cancer, and infectious and autoimmune diseases. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - March 29, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

UCLA researchers develop sophisticated open-source program for analyzing thyroid health
UCLA researchers have developed a software program that simulates the response of the human thyroid hormone regulation system to a variety of treatments and diseases. The open-source program, Thyrosim, can be used by clinicians, researchers and educators to accurately gauge the impacts of thyroid treatments and to develop more effective remedies for thyroid problems. The research appears on the cover of the peer-reviewed journal Thyroid. Principal investigator Joseph DiStefano III, a distinguished professor of computer science and medicine and chair of the UCLA Computational and Systems Biology Interdepartmental Program,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 29, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Inmedix Meets with FDA to Discuss the Development Plan Supporting...
Inmedix, the leader in heart rate variability (HRV) application as an informative diagnostic tool in autoimmune disease, today announced that the FDA has provided guidance for the required development...(PRWeb March 28, 2016)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/03/prweb13295192.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - March 28, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Women With Breast CancerAutoimmune Thyroid Disease in Women With Breast Cancer
How prevalent are thyroid disorders among breast cancer patients? Endocrine Practice (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

Is Bariatric Surgery a Trigger for Autoimmune Diseases?Is Bariatric Surgery a Trigger for Autoimmune Diseases?
Read about 4 patients undergoing bariatric surgery, who subsequently developed systemic autoimmune diseases. Did surgery trigger their diseases? Journal of Clinical Rheumatology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology Journal Article Source Type: news

Claims that man flu 'really exists' are unsupported
Conclusion This small laboratory study points to specific biological mechanisms that might explain why women are more likely to suffer autoimmune disorders, such as SLE, than men. It found the second silenced copy of the X chromosome in women can be partially reactivated and express immune-related genes, instead of staying completely silent. Though this is a plausible reason for the overactive immune system found in SLE, it does not explain why men can also have the condition. Also, only SLE was investigated in this study and with blood samples from just five children with the condition. It is not clear at this stage how...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Medical practice Source Type: news

Bristol-Myers Squibb to acquire Padlock Therapeutics, Inc.
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) and Padlock Therapeutics, Inc. announced today that the companies have signed a definitive agreement under which Bristol-Myers Squibb will acquire all of the outstanding capital stock of Padlock, a private, Cambridge, Massachusetts-based biotechnology company dedicated to creating new medicines to treat destructive autoimmune diseases. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 23, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Bristol-Myers Squibb Business and Industry Source Type: news

Finding the Healer Within
A new patient came to me for an acute infection, and I thought it would be a quick and easy visit. During her exam, I asked about her weight, as she was quite thin. She had been recently diagnosed with Graves disease and was just now regaining the significant weight she had lost. Graves disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid, also known as hyperthyroidism. The thyroid is a small butterfly-shaped gland in the front of the neck that controls our metabolism, among other processes and hers was on overdrive. When she was diagnosed, her endocrinologist said immediately, "we'll just remove your thyroid." My patient respo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why We Should All Celebrate World Down Syndrome Day
March 21st is internationally recognized as World Down Syndrome Day. Just like typical people, individuals with Down syndrome have two copies of each of their 23 chromosomes but they have third copy of chromosome 21, a genetic condition known as trisomy 21, hence the celebration on March 21st or 3-21. While it is important to celebrate all the things that people with Down syndrome can do and how similar they are to others, I would argue it is equally important to acknowledge the ongoing fight against discrimination that their differences evoke. If we consider that discrimination leveled against women or African Americans ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Transplant drug helpful for patients with progressive liver condition
(Wiley) New research indicates that mycophenolate mofetil, a drug that is usually used to prevent rejection after kidney, heart or liver transplant, seems safe and effective in treating autoimmune hepatitis, a serious chronic liver disease that mainly affects women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 21, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Precision medicine's potential to define the genetics of autoimmune disease
Demonstrating the potential of precision medicine, an international study used next-generation DNA sequencing technology to identify more than 1,000 gene variants that affect susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

I Am My Mother's Chimera. Chances Are, So Are You.
For years the concept of a "genetic chimera" -- an individual with two genetically distinct cells lines in his/her body -- has sparked the imagination of writers: from Stephen King to Michael Crichton, from CSI to The Office. The idea that an individual could harbor his/her own twin is creepy and intriguing at the same time. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have allowed us to probe much deeper into a person's genome, to the point that today scientists believe that chimerism could be far more common than what we originally thought. Chances are, you could be your own twin. But how surprised would you be if I to...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

I Am My Mother's Chimera. Chances Are, So Are You.
For years the concept of a "genetic chimera" -- an individual with two genetically distinct cells lines in his/her body -- has sparked the imagination of writers: from Stephen King to Michael Crichton, from CSI to The Office. The idea that an individual could harbor his/her own twin is creepy and intriguing at the same time. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have allowed us to probe much deeper into a person's genome, to the point that today scientists believe that chimerism could be far more common than what we originally thought. Chances are, you could be your own twin. But how surprised would you be if I tol...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study shows precision medicine's potential to define the genetics of autoimmune disease
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Demonstrating the potential of precision medicine, an international study based at UT Southwestern Medical Center used next-generation DNA sequencing technology to identify more than 1,000 gene variants that affect susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Can I Still Be Italian If I Don't Eat Pasta?
Illustrated by Mallory Heller. "Cut out the booze and the coffee. And dial back your workouts." That's what the doctor told me a few months ago. My first reaction: no, no, and no. When a woman gets that kind of talk from a doctor, it's probably because she's pregnant. But not me -- I had just been diagnosed with adult onset Type 1 diabetes (it's commonly known as juvenile diabetes). I was floored -- I exercised five times a week and steered clear of fast food and soda. Turns out, that didn't really matter. "This is an autoimmune disease, it has nothing to do with your lifestyle," my doctor said. To stay alive and manage ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists discover a link between psoriasis and general bone loss
For the first time, researchers have linked psoriasis to the risk of widespread bone loss and describe how the protein IL-17 acts as a 'messenger' between the skin and the bones. IL-17 inhibitors, some of which already on the market, could simultaneously address skin inflammation and associated bone loss. These results recommend monitoring the bone mass of patients with psoriasis to select the most appropriate treatment. The study has potential implications in other autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

ImmunogenX acquires Alvine Pharmaceuticals' assets
Clinical-stage company ImmunogenX has acquired the assets of Alvine Pharmaceuticals, which develops biologics to target autoimmune / inflammatory diseases. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - March 16, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Meat Eating -- What Should We Do?
Photo Credit: Richard Dunn The global population of farm animals is growing twice as fast as the human population, creating "the other population crisis." How big is this problem? About 10 times as many animals as there are people in the world are now raised for food each year. Controversy swirls around the subject of eating meat, with huge implications for human health, our environment, and animal welfare. We each make decisions about what we eat, day after day, for our entire lifetime. The cumulative consequences of our decisions are significant. The production of meat impacts the environment and animal welfare far more...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hydrolyzed Infant Formulas Do Not Appear to Protect Against Allergic or Autoimmune Disease (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM Use of hydrolyzed cows' milk formula in high-risk infants does not appear to reduce the risk for allergic or autoimmune disease, according to a large meta-analysis in The … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 9, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news