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This page shows you the latest news items in this category. This is page number 17.

New method to reduce disease-causing inflammation discovered
An enzyme known as Tumor Progression Locus 2, or Tpl2, plays a key role in directing and regulating several important components of the body's immune system, researchers report. Their discovery may one day lead to new treatments for many common autoimmune diseases. "This is an emerging field," one researcher said. "We have a lot of work to do, but many of our preliminary results are promising." (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 16, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

UGA researchers discover new method to reduce disease-causing inflammation
(University of Georgia) Researchers at the University of Georgia report in the Journal of Biological Chemistry that an enzyme known as Tumor Progression Locus 2, or Tpl2, plays a key role in directing and regulating several important components of the body's immune system. Their discovery may one day lead to new treatments for many common autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 16, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Neuromics-Vitro Biopharma in Posrche Cup
Racing to Health and Peak Performance.Neuromics and Vitro Biopharma are proud sponsors of the European Porsche Cup Car driven by our partner, friend and race car driver extraordinaire, Dr. Joe Smarda.Dr. Smarda, an applied immunologist, is our partner in Europe for testing and treating sufferers of autoimmune diseases, sports injuries and autism with Stem Cell Activators. We are also testing these activating agents for the ability to improve the mental acuity and physical performance of healthy individuals.He recently won a race at the Nurbring Ring in Germany. Hmmm, I wonder if the Stem Cell Activators he is taking, ...
Source: Neuromics - June 15, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Neuromics Porsche Cup Racing regenerative medicine sports medicine stem cell activation stem cell activators Stem Cell Based Therapies Vitro Biopharma Source Type: news

Parasitic worms of pigs could provide new treatments of human diseases
(University of Melbourne) Lead researcher, Dr. Aaron Jex, Faculty of Veterinary Science, said, 'We know that humans infected with the harmless, 'pig whipworm' can have significantly reduced symptoms linked to autoimmune diseases. And now we have the genetic sequence of the worm, it opens the door to future human drug designs and treatment.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Invisible Illness: It’s not easy to combat what you can’t see!
There is a surprising common factor which is shared by a vast range of physical and mental health conditions. Fibromyalgia, anxiety, endometriosis, lupus, endometriosis, pelvic pain and depression may vary in causes and symptoms, but all of them have a deadly weapon in common – invisibility. They are often classed as an invisible illness. These conditions fight their invisible war on two fronts. Firstly, they leave no trace. The majority of these diseases attack the body internally, leaving no external signs which might allow the patient’s suffering to be easily recognised. As well as causing physical pain, invisible i...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - June 13, 2014 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Health Conditions anxiety autoimmune disease depression endometriosis fibromyalgia invisible illness lupus pelvic pain Source Type: news

Evaluation of the Adverse Effect of Low Concentration of Cadmium on Interleukin-4 Induced Class Switch Recombination in Burkett’s Lymphoma Raji Cell Line
Affinity maturation of B lymphocytes, a process that includes somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, initiates global DNA rearrangements. The interruption of this process has an adverse effect on human health and results in immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease. Class switch recombination is a fundamental factor of the human adaptive immunity. Evaluation of the class switch recombination efficiency is an important component of laboratory diagnostic of immunotoxic components. Here, we describe a method for testing the efficiency of the class switch recombination. Cultivation of Raji Burkett’s lymphoma...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - June 10, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Chemotactic Responses by Macrophages to a Directional Source of a Cytokine Delivered by a Micropipette
Macrophages, which are organized throughout every tissue, represent a key component of the immune system and the recruitment of macrophages to specific sites is important in normal host defense. However, when inappropriately recruited macrophages may damage or destroy healthy tissue; this is seen in several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. Many cytokines, including CSF-1 and chemokines, are often upregulated in inflamed tissues and can induce the directional migration of macrophages towards the highest concentration of the cytokine in a process called chemotaxis. Chemokines were first described as chemoattractant cyt...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - June 10, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Faster, higher, stronger: A protein that enables powerful initial immune response
(The Wistar Institute) A team of Wistar scientists offer evidence that a protein, called Foxp1, is a key controller of our immune system's ability to generate an antibody response. Manipulating this protein's activity, they say, could provide a useful pathway to boosting antibody responses to treat infectious diseases, for example, or suppressing them to treat autoimmune disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Stem Cell Therapies without Transplants
Neuromics is partnering with Vitro Biopharma to develop stem cell activating/boosting therapies. Stem cell based therapies represent a shining light of hope for sufferers of chronic or life threatening diseases.  Though, for most, realization of this hope is light years into the future.Dr. Jim Musick, CEO of Vitrobiopharma, recently blogged on the obstacles to approved therapies : "Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells has been widely used as an approved treatment of leukemia, lymphoma and certain autoimmune conditions for the past fifty years. Other adult stem cells have demonstrated safety and effica...
Source: Neuromics - June 7, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Tags: hMCS Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells regenerative medicine stem cell activation stem cell activators stem cell boosters stem cell therapies Source Type: news

Autoimmune Disease & Risk of Gastric Neuroendocrine NeoplasmAutoimmune Disease & Risk of Gastric Neuroendocrine Neoplasm
Are patients with thyroid disease at risk for gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms? Clinical Endocrinology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

Arena begins Phase Ib trial of APD334 to treat autoimmune diseases
US-based Arena Pharmaceuticals has started dosing patients in an investigational Phase Ib clinical trial of APD334, an oral drug candidate that targets the sphingosine 1-phosphate subtype 1 (S1P1) receptor, to treat a number of autoimmune diseases. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - June 4, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Marijuana shows potential in treating autoimmune disease
Researchers have discovered a novel pathway through which marijuana's main active constituent, THC, can suppress the body's immune functions. The recent findings show that THC can change critical molecules of epigenome called histones, leading to suppression of inflammation. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 2, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Marijuana shows potential in treating autoimmune disease
(University of South Carolina) A team of University of South Carolina researchers have discovered a novel pathway through which marijuana can suppress the body's immune functions. The recent findings show that marijuana THC can change critical molecules of epigenome called histones, leading to suppression of inflammation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 2, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

A Product For Gaucher Disease And A Plant-Cell For Protein Production – Protalix Biotherapeutics Is On The Rise
Protalix has a unique plant-cell platform for therapeutic protein production and an approved product, Elelyso/Uplyso (taliglucerase alfa), for Gaucher disease. In the company’s pipeline is a chemically modified version of the recombinant alpha-Galactosidase-A protein for Fabry disease (Phase 1/2), an oral glucocerebrosidase (GCD) enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher disease (Phase 1), an oral anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor) fusion protein for autoimmune/inflammatory conditions (preclinical), and a human deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) for cystic fibrosis (preclinical), and other enzyme replacement therapies in early...
Source: Pharmaceutical Online News - May 30, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA allows marketing of first non-invasive test to help in identifying cause of certain kidney disease
Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowed marketing of the first test that can help determine if a specific type of kidney disease, called membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), is due to the body’s rejection of its own kidney tissue (autoimmune) or if it is due to another cause (such an infection). (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - May 29, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: news

IgG Stable With Rituxan in Autoimmune Disease
(MedPage Today) -- Repeated doses of rituximab in patients with vasculitis or lupus had no association with increased rates of low immunoglobulin (Ig)G, an important infection-fighting component of the immune system, a retrospective study found. (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - May 28, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Lupus Therapies Continue to Evolve
May is National Lupus Awareness Month, a time to think about lupus and the challenges it presents to patients. Learn about this chronic, autoimmune disease and the promise of future therapies. (Source: FDA Consumer Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Updates - May 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccines and Biologics: Questions Remain
(MedPage Today) -- Vaccinations for patients with autoimmune diseases -- specifically patients being treated with biologics -- bring with them a variety of issues, including disease-specific, medication-related, and vaccine-associated factors, researchers suggested. (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - May 24, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cells: RaDAR guides proteins into the nucleus
A novel pathway by which proteins are actively and specifically shuttled into the nucleus of a cell has been discovered by scientists. The finding captures a precise molecular barcode that flags proteins for such import and describes the biochemical interaction that drives this critically important process. The discovery could help illuminate the molecular dysfunction that underpins a broad array of ailments, ranging from autoimmune diseases to cancers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

RaDAR guides proteins into the nucleus
(Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research) A Ludwig Cancer Research study has identified a novel pathway by which proteins are actively and specifically shuttled into the nucleus of a cell. Published online today in Cell, the finding captures a precise molecular barcode that flags proteins for such import and describes the biochemical interaction that drives this critically important process. The discovery could help illuminate the molecular dysfunction that underpins a broad array of ailments, ranging from autoimmune diseases to cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AR CAG repeat and autoimmunity in lupus
Clinical and experimental evidence support a role for gonadal steroids in modulating the expression and course of autoimmune diseases such as lupus. It is not known if inherited variation in sensitivity to circulating androgenic hormones could influence the manifestations of such a disease. Olsen and colleagues found that shorter AR CAG repeat lengths in lupus subjects correlated with a higher Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index score, higher ANA levels, expression of a broader array of IgG autoantibodies, more severe clinical manifestations, and more exuberant humoral autoimmunity. These findings suggest a...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 21, 2014 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Patient Led Research Paving the Way For Early Diagnosis of Autoimmune...
A new patient-centered research study led by the International Foundation for Autoimmune Arthritis aims to develop a new standard in early detection and diagnosis of Autoimmune Arthritis diseases. As...(PRWeb May 19, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11863493.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 19, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Molecules involved in rheumatoid arthritis angiogenesis identified
Two protein molecules that fit together as lock and key seem to promote the abnormal formation of blood vessels in joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis, according to researchers who found that the substances are present at higher levels in the joints of patients affected by the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease in which the body's own defenses attack the tissues lining the joints, causing painful swelling and bone erosion that can ultimately lead to joint deformities. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 16, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

B cells produce antibodies 'when danger calls, but not when it whispers,' scientists report
The immune system’s B cells protect us from disease by producing antibodies, or "smart bullets," that specifically target invaders such as pathogens and viruses while leaving harmless molecules alone. But how do B cells determine whether a threat is real and whether to start producing these weapons? An international team of life scientists shows in the May 16 issue of the journal Science how and why these cells respond only to true threats. "It is critical for B cells to respond either fully or not at all. Anything in between causes disease," said the study’s senior author, Alexander Hoffmann, a professor of microbio...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 15, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Shingle Risk High in Lupus, RA, COPD
(MedPage Today) -- Patients with autoimmune diseases and certain other chronic conditions are at increased risk for herpes zoster, a U.K. case-control study found. (Source: MedPage Today Geriatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Geriatrics - May 14, 2014 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

Neil Riordan, PhD Presents at American Academy of Anti-Aging...
Neil Riordan, PhD will Present “Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Autoimmune Diseases” at the 22nd Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging, Regenerative and Aesthetic Medicine at...(PRWeb May 13, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11847056.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 13, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How immune cells use steroids
Some immune cells turn themselves off by producing a steroid, researchers have found. The findings have implications for the study of cancers, autoimmune diseases and parasitic infections. "We were really surprised to see that these immune cells are producing a steroid. In cell culture, we see that the steroids play a part in regulating T cell proliferation," says the study's designer. "We had already seen that T-helper cells were producing steroids, but initially we were blind -- what was going on?" (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 8, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

How immune cells use steroids
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Researchers at the European Bioinformatics Institute and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered that some immune cells turn themselves off by producing a steroid. The findings, published in Cell Reports, have implications for the study of cancers, autoimmune diseases and parasitic infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Outwitting immunity to treat disease: Start-up raises 37 millions dollars
(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) What do multiple sclerosis, type I diabetes and food allergies have in common? All these conditions are caused by an abnormal immune response. Anokion is developing an extremely promising technology to treat autoimmune conditions and other maladies. This method was able tp completely prevent disease in mice that were developing type I diabetes. The first clinical trials on humans are planned for 2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 5, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What is in the Differential Diagnosis of Purpura?
Discussion Children presenting with rashes are common but certain characteristics may be concerning such as descriptions of petechiae or purpura. Purpura are characterized by non-blanching skin lesions between 3-10 mm in size that are caused by bleeding into the skin. Usually they are reddish-purplish hence the name purpura coming from the Latin word. Non-blanching lesions that are 10 mm are ecchymosis. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a generalized vasculitis that commonly involves the gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, skin and joints, and is especially seen in children 2-11 years old. Classically HSP presents with p...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 5, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Autoimmune diseases may succumb to new drug strategy
New pharmaceuticals to fight autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, may be identified more effectively by adding genome analysis to standard drug screening, according to a new study. The three potential drug candidates chosen for this study, selected from a large library of screened chemicals, each knocked down the response of Th17 cells, a type of immune cell that drives many autoimmune diseases by attacking normal cells in the body. More specifically, the drugs homed in on an essential molecule within the Th17 cells. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 2, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

May eFactor
Birnbaum featured at EPA Earth Day event Board of Scientific Counselors advises NTP on draft concepts and more NIEHS and the Energy Future Coalition hold workshop on ultrafine particles from vehicle emissions Presentations and virtual forum mark Autism Awareness Month at NIEHS Centers focus on emerging environmental health science and collaboration Tsunami exercise helps prepare research community for disaster response The GuLF STUDY four years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill NIEHS grantee honored for autism research at White House ceremony SOT honors NTP and NIEHS researchers NIEHS postdocs awarded NIH K99 ...
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 1, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Vitamin D in the Newborn, Part II: Bases for Current Dietary Recommendations in Term and Preterm Neonates
Since 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has published three documents related to vitamin D requirements of term and preterm infants. The need for developing and updating such guidelines emphasizes the importance of vitamin D not only as an essential element of bone health but also as a nutrient and prohormone that plays an increasingly recognized role in many other organ systems. It has also been implicated in the prevention of infections, allergies, autoimmune diseases, and some forms of cancer. In this article (the second part of a review of vitamin D in the neonate), we discuss the bases for current vitamin...
Source: NeoReviews recent issues - May 1, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Mimouni, F. B. Tags: Articles Source Type: news

Preliminary clinical trial shows great promise for new multiple sclerosis treatment
​ A study conducted by Dr. Rhonda Voskuhl, a UCLA neurologist, shows that combining estriol, a female hormone, with Copaxone, a medication currently used to treat multiple sclerosis, reduced the relapse rate of MS by nearly 50 percent with only one year of treatment.   Voskuhl presented the results of the preliminary Phase II clinical trial today at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Philadelphia.   The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involved 158 women with relapsing-remitting MS. At 16 sites across the U.S., one group of women was treated with Copaxone, a commonly prescribed...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 30, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Top medicine articles for April 2014
A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:School children who are bullied are twice as likely to think about killing themselves, and to make suicide attempts http://buff.ly/1gPc1gYA widely reported 43% decrease in obesity among U.S. preschoolers was "too good to be true" - increase is likely http://buff.ly/1gPcCzeHigher BPA Levels Associated with Prostate Cancer, due to centrosome amplification. BPA, found in many plastics and food and beverage containers, is detectable in the urine of over 90% of Americans http://buff.ly/1gPd7JKFormula for Decoding Health News: Final opinion on headline = (initi...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - April 29, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Health News of the Day Source Type: news

The Other Diabetes
We know a tremendous amount information about Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and our efforts to manage the disease seem to continue to develop and expand. But, there is another type of diabetes that we still don't know enough about. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, aka, LADA is topic I certainly don't fully understand. LADA is an autoimmune disease characterized by age, positive antibodies, a gradual increase in insulin requirements and decreasing ability to make insulin as indicated by a low C-peptide.  People with LADA eventually need to use insulin as a form of managing there blood sugars. I have only come across a h...
Source: About Diabetes - April 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Migraines show a link to gluten in some cases
Migraines can be a sign of celiac disease, researchers say. Celiac patients had a greater incidence of headaches — and severe headaches, at that — than a control group in a study published last year by researchers at Columbia University in New York City. Celiac disease is an autoimmune... (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - April 25, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

“Natural Autoimmune Disease Treatment Options,” A New Article On...
“Natural Autoimmune Disease Treatment Options,” a new article on the website Vkool.com uncovers effective techniques on how to cure autoimmune.(PRWeb April 22, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/autoimmune-disease/treatment/prweb11783405.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - April 24, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Is Parkinson's Disease an Autoimmune Disease
The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. The study was published April 16, 2014, in Nature Communications. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - April 19, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Parkinson ' s Disease Source Type: news

Man who suffered headaches has 'calcium stones' in his brain
The stones were due to him suffering from undiagnosed coeliac disease - an autoimmune disease caused by intolerance to gluten. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Parkinson's an autoimmune disease?
The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 17, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Certain thyroid-related diseases may vary by race (Health Day, 15 April 2014)
An Australian study in JAMA assessed the impact of race on determining the risk of developing autoimmune thyroid conditions such as Grave’s disease or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Full article (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 16, 2014 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Sensitive balance in immune system: How one molecule can affect health outcomes
The protein c-FLIPR plays a key role in controlling a 'cellular suicide' process named 'apoptosis.' Scientists have described the significance of c-FLIPR for the immune system in detail: In the presence of an excess of this molecule, mice can fight infectious diseases better, but they develop autoimmune diseases as they get older. The inhibitory effect of c-FLIPR on apoptosis is the underlying cause in both cases. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sensitive balance in the immune system
(Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research) The protein c-FLIPR plays a key role in controlling a 'cellular suicide' process named 'apoptosis.' Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research have described the significance of c-FLIPR for the immune system in detail: In the presence of an excess of this molecule, mice can fight infectious diseases better, but they develop autoimmune diseases as they get older. The inhibitory effect of c-FLIPR on apoptosis is the underlying cause in both cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 11, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Enhancement of Plasmid-Mediated Transgene Expression
A large number of studies aimed at the treatment of cancer, autoimmune and metabolic diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, allergic diseases, as well as muscle disorders strengthen the fact that gene therapy could represent an alternative method to treat human diseases where conventional approaches are less effective. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Immunology - April 10, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: news

Support for Autoimmune-Epilepsy LinkSupport for Autoimmune-Epilepsy Link
A new population-based study provides more evidence of a significantly increased risk for epilepsy among patients with an autoimmune disease. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 7, 2014 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Studies on the T Cell Receptor (TCR) Revision of Autoantibody-Inducing CD4 T (aiCD4 T) Cell
Our recent studies into the role of autoantibody-inducing CD4 T cells in autoimmune disease have necessitated studies on the mechanism of TCR revision, a phenomenon that has been difficult to approach experimentally. Here we describe a detailed experimental technique to investigate the molecular events involved in TCR revision. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news

Characterization of Innate Immune Signalings Stimulated by Ligands for Pattern Recognition Receptors
The innate immunity is an essential step as the front line of host defense, and its aberrant activation particularly in response to nucleic acids is closely related to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Characterization of the innate immune signalings may provide a pathophysiological insight for better understanding of human diseases. Nucleic acid-mediated activation of pattern recognition receptors triggers the activation of two major intracellular signaling pathways, which are dependent on NF-κB and interferon regulatory factors, transcriptional factors. This leads to the subsequent induction...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news

Mouse Model of Experimental Dermal Fibrosis: The Bleomycin-Induced Dermal Fibrosis
Relevant animal models are essential tools to investigate in depth the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder that affects particularly the skin. SSc is characterized by vasculopathy, immune disturbances, and fibrosis. Expression of each of the three pathologic features varies among SSc patients leading to disease heterogeneity and variable organ manifestations. Several animal models of SSc are available; however, some models display inflammation followed by fibrosis, whether some others primarily mimic autonomous fibroblast activation. Here, we describe the...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news

Genome-Wide Genetic Study in Autoimmune Disease-Prone Mice
Mouse models of autoimmune diseases provide invaluable insights into the cellular and molecular bases of autoimmunity. Genetic linkage studies focusing on their abnormal quantitative phenotypes in relation to the loss of self-tolerance will lead to the identification of polymorphic genes that play pivotal roles in the genetic predisposition to autoimmunity. In this chapter, we first overview the basic concepts in the statistical genetics and then provide guides to genotyping microsatellite DNA markers and to quantitative trait loci mapping using a MAPMAKER program. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news