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This page shows you the latest news items in this category. This is page number 15.

Adaptive Biotechnologies Acquires Sequenta, Could Disrupt Disease Detection
Adaptive Biotechnologies Corporation is buying Sequenta Inc. for an undisclosed sum to create a new company that uses powerful immunosequencing techniques to diagnose and fight cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune disorders. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - January 9, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

People with type 1 diabetes are living longer
Better blood sugar control may be the key to longer survival Ninety years ago, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence: half of people who developed it died within two years; more than 90% were dead within five years. Thanks to the introduction of insulin therapy in 1922, and numerous advances since then, many people with type 1 diabetes now live into their 50s and beyond. But survival in this group still falls short of that among people without diabetes. A Scottish study published this week in JAMA shows that at the age of 20, individuals with type 1 diabetes on average lived 12 fewer years than 20-year-olds without it. A se...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - January 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Howard LeWine, M.D. Tags: Diabetes type 1 diabetes Source Type: news

Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia: Associations, OutcomesNonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia: Associations, Outcomes
Is idiopathic NSIP a first manifestation of an underlying systemic autoimmune disease? BMC Pulmonary Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Stress can be a factor for developing diabetes, autoimmune diseases
Recurring stress can trigger insulin resistance, hypertension, abdominal fat deposition, researchers say. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

D.C. Doctor Working to Save Mike, Other Ugandan Kids at Risk of Preventable Death
Andrea Beaton was being practical. One of the final requirements of the global health track of her general pediatric residency program was spending eight weeks working in a developing country. Knowing that a leader at her next employer already was doing amazing work in Uganda, off she went to that impoverished-yet-improving African nation. Her aim was studying a rare heart muscle disease. Instead, she was overwhelmed by something so basic, so simple. Sore throats. In Uganda, sore throats -- strep, actually -- are so common that kids don't complain about it and aren't treated for it. This can create problems in their he...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 22, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

immunoLink Therapies-Intitial Products
Feeling and performing your best depends on balanced immunity and stem cell vitality Your current investment in exercise, healthy diet and supplements are aiming you towards what we call the immunoLink sweet spot. If you have hit the bull’s eye, you would be seeking ways to stay there, because this is where you feel awesomely great and are most productive. If you have never been there, now is the time. Illness, injury and medical procedures push you from the spot, but if you are near or on it, your recovery will be faster and more complete. The far reaches of the immunoLink Spectrum represent a cold wasteland of misery a...
Source: Neuromics - December 18, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Tags: autoimmune disease Autoimmunity Curcumin immune response immune system immune system boosters stem cell activation stem cell activators stem cell boosters stem-kine StemTrophin Source Type: news

immunoLink Therapies-Initial Products
Feeling and performing your best depends on balanced immunity and stem cell vitality Your current investment in exercise, healthy diet and supplements are aiming you towards what we call the immunoLink sweet spot. If you have hit the bull’s eye, you would be seeking ways to stay there, because this is where you feel awesomely great and are most productive. If you have never been there, now is the time. Illness, injury and medical procedures push you from the spot, but if you are near or on it, your recovery will be faster and more complete. The far reaches of the immunoLink Spectrum represent a cold wasteland of misery a...
Source: Neuromics - December 18, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Tags: autoimmune disease Autoimmunity Curcumin immune response immune system immune system boosters stem cell activation stem cell activators stem cell boosters stem-kine StemTrophin Source Type: news

Do Autoimmune Diseases Begin in the Gut?Do Autoimmune Diseases Begin in the Gut?
Dr Stephen Paget discusses the role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in rheumatologic disorders. Medscape Rheumatology (Source: Medscape Rheumatology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Rheumatology Headlines - December 18, 2014 Category: Rheumatology Tags: Rheumatology Commentary Source Type: news

5 Important Things You Probably Didn't Know About Vitamin D
When it comes to getting the nutrients and minerals our bodies need, vitamin D should not be overlooked. You might know that this fat-soluble nutrient helps keep your bones strong, but it does so much more. Some of its benefits may even surprise you. Here are five interesting facts about vitamin D, and how you can make sure you are receiving an adequate amount. 1. You get it through diet and sunlight. Vitamin D is known as the "sunshine" vitamin because when your skin is exposed to the sun, your body manufactures it. Many people only need about 15 minutes of sun three times a week for their bodies to make adequate amoun...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 12, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Inflammasome Activation and Rheumatic Disease: Six Basic Points
(MedPage Today) -- A new target for autoimmune disorder therapies. (Source: MedPage Today Geriatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Geriatrics - December 12, 2014 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

North Texas Fracking Zone Sees Growing Health Worries
This story was published by The Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit, nonpartisan investigative news organization in Washington, D.C. DALLAS—Propped up on a hospital bed, Taylor Ishee listened as his mother shared a conviction that choked her up. His rare cancer had a cause, she believes, and it wasn’t genetics. Others in Texas have drawn the same conclusions about their confounding illnesses. Jana DeGrand, who suffered a heart attack and needed both her gallbladder and her appendix removed. Rebecca Williams, fighting off unexplained rashes, sharp headaches and repeated bouts of pneumonia. Maile Bush, who needed ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Autoimmune Disease Diagnostics Market By Product (Systemic, Localized,...
Autoimmune disease diagnostics market will be worth $14.17billion in 2020. View full report with TOC -...(PRWeb December 11, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/autoimmune-disease/diagnostics-market-growth/prweb12388722.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - December 11, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New signaling role for key protein may contribute to wound healing, tumor growth
A key protein may represent a new way to use the immune system to speed healing and counter inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune diseases, according to study. The current study results revolve around proteinases, enzymes that break down proteins as part of cellular life. Matrix metalloproteinases or MMPs specifically target the extracellular matrix, the non-cell, structural framework within tissues. Beyond that role, the new study found that one member of this family, MMP-2, has another signaling role related to the human immune system. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 5, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

New signaling role for key protein may contribute to wound healing, tumor growth
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) A key protein may represent a new way to use the immune system to speed healing and counter inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune diseases, according to study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the December issue of Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 5, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

IT HAPPENED TO ME: I Temporarily Had A Physical Disability
By Julia Reinstein As a person who has been able-bodied my whole life, I thought I was having one of those nightmares where you can't move or run away. It took me half an hour to realize that I was, in fact, awake. This was real. It was the spring of my sophomore year of college when I contracted Löfgren syndrome, an acute autoimmune disease that attacked the fat cells in my joints, particularly my knees. My legs swelled up like tree trunks and I broke out in nasty red bumps that felt hot to the touch. Every morning, I would wake up with legs so stiff and pained that I would only gain the strength to walk after several ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Revolutionary Way to Be Healthy, #6: Redefine Your Role
There's something about illness and injury that messes not just with your body, but with your whole sense of identity. And the longer and more profoundly you're oppressed by physical limitations, the more vulnerable and disempowered you can feel. If you throw your back out or break your leg, you'll immediately experience the reality shift that comes with significant physical limitation. And if you've ever suffered a high fever or a bout of food poisoning, you know that's all it takes to turn a confident and competent adult into a helpless, whimpering child. Any acute illness or injury can smack you down in ways that temp...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 2, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why You Should Be a Pegan -- Part Two
In part one of this blog, I discussed how both paleo and vegan camps cherry pick research to substantiate their beliefs, and how the truth oftentimes lies between the lines. Looking beyond this confusion, what's an eater to do? I vote for being a pegan or paleo-vegan, which is what I have chosen for myself and recommend for most of my patients. Keep in mind that most of us need to personalize the approach depending on our health conditions, preferences and needs. What is a pegan?  Well since I just made it up, I guess it's up to me to define. Let's focus first on what is in common between paleo and vegan (healthy vegan...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 1, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Herpes Vaccine Safe in Patients With Arthritis on BiologicsHerpes Vaccine Safe in Patients With Arthritis on Biologics
Patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are more prone to getting herpes zoster than the general population, but these patients can be safely vaccinated, a new study has suggested. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology News Source Type: news

Beyond vitamin D: Sunlight exposure reduces weight gain and helps stop diabetes
(NaturalNews) In recent years, health experts have emphasized the importance of increasing blood levels of vitamin D as a way to prevent not just bone and tooth disorders but also autoimmune disease, cancer and many other chronic health conditions. Yet, rather than recommending that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nervous system may play bigger role in infections than previously known
The nervous system may play a bigger role in infections and autoimmune diseases than previously known. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 26, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Breath test for Type 1 diabetes could spot signs in children before they develop symptoms
Oxford University researchers are developing a hand-held device which could quickly identify the autoimmune disease, potentially saving many lives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 26, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nervous system may play bigger role in infections than previously known
(St. Michael's Hospital) The nervous system may play a bigger role in infections and autoimmune diseases than previously known. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 26, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

OHSU is proceeding cautiously on new MS treatment using stem cells
Oregon Health & Science University isn't rushing to use a new a Multiple Sclerosis therapy that uses a person's own stem cells. Dr. Richard Burt, chief of the division of immunotherapy at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, on Friday spoke to a group of physicians at OHSU's Multiple Sclerosis Center about use of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). It's a relatively unknown treatment for autoimmune diseases, Burt said. HSCT is typically known as a cancer treatment for lymphomas. "It's… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 24, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rivkela Brodsky Source Type: news

Genes Predict Thombotic Risk
(MedPage Today) -- Screen for antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with autoimmune diseases. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - November 22, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Epitope Generation Process May Play Role in Autoimmune Diseases
(Source: News from NIGMS Funded Institutions)
Source: News from NIGMS Funded Institutions - November 21, 2014 Category: Research Source Type: news

Teasing out glitches in immune system's self-recognition
In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 21, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers tease out glitches in immune system's self-recognition
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cambridge company recognized for potential Celiac-curing vaccine
ImmusanT Inc., the Cambridge company that is developing a vaccine that would allow people with Celiac disease to eat gluten, has received some important recognition. Informa has named the company's drug one of the Top 10 Autoimmune/Anti-Inflammatory Projects to Watch. That has given new energy to ImmusanT executives as they enter Phase 2 of clinical trials. One percent of the world's population has Celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that triggers a defensive response to gluten. "We believe… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 20, 2014 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Immune System/Stem Cell Health and Aging
Looking, feeling and  performing your best depends on balanced immunity and stem cell vitalityAs we age we encounter:Slower healingLonger recovery time from vigorous exerciseMore general aches and painsLonger recovery from illnessWrinkled, dry and thinning skinWhy is that? What are the causes? Answers can be found by a better understanding of immune/inflammatory response and stem cell systems. As we age our immune system weakens or becomes dysregulated (autoimmunity) and our stem cell "bank balances" deplete. My friend and world class stem cell therapies expert, Dr. Neil Riordan, gives an excellent description of the ...
Source: Neuromics - November 14, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Tags: aging autoimmune disease Autoimmunity chronic pain immune response immune system inflammatory response Stem Cells stem-kine StemKine Source Type: news

Adrenal insufficiency - 2014 Lancet review
Adrenal insufficiency is the deficient production or action of glucocorticoids, with or without deficiency also in mineralocorticoids and adrenal androgens. It is a life-threatening disorder that can result from:- primary adrenal failure- secondary adrenal disease due to impairment of the hypothalamic—pituitary axis Prompt diagnosis and management are essential. The clinical manifestations of primary adrenal insufficiency result from deficiency of all adrenocortical hormones, but they can also include signs of other concurrent autoimmune conditions. In secondary or tertiary adrenal insufficiency, the clinical picture res...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - November 12, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Endocrinology Lancet Source Type: news

Living Donor Transplants No Longer 'Last Resort'Living Donor Transplants No Longer 'Last Resort'
Patients with cholestatic or autoimmune disease treated at experienced transplant centers had good outcomes when they received portions of livers from living donors. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - November 11, 2014 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Transparent Nearly Invisible Mice Created By Japanese Scientists
Scientists are getting a look at the inner workings of mice like never before thanks to a new technique that renders the rodents so transparent they're nearly invisible. Researchers from the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center at Osaka University say the biggest challenge was the light-blocking "heme" in hemoglobin, which puts the red into red blood cells and is found in most tissue in the body. As it turns out, a substance used to make brains transparent for imaging also works to clear out heme. At first, the researchers were able to make translucent mice organs. Here's an image showing the kidney, liver and pancreas on...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Obesity plays major role in triggering autoimmune diseases
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) Autoimmune diseases like Crohn's Disease and multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks its own body rather than predatory invaders, affect 5-20 percent of the global community. A new study by Professor Yehuda Shoenfeld of Tel Aviv University points to the major role obesity plays in triggering and prolonging these autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Why Human Brains Are Better At Learning
One of the most amazing things about the human brain is neuroplasticity -- the brain's ability to reorganize and restructure itself with new knowledge and experiences. Simply put, learning literally changes the brain. While scientists used to think that the brain stopped developing in early childhood, we now know that the brain continues changing and adapting into middle and old age. But we're still learning about the nature of plasticity. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have just discovered that the brain's plasticity doesn't work the way that neuroscientists had previously thought. While previous the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 7, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kineta wants to change biotech investing from 'a black box' to shorter, transparent model
Kineta, a Seattle-based company founded in 2008, is a different type of biotech. Its co-founders, CEO Charles Magness and Chief Scientific Officer Shawn Iadonato, aren't just focusing on developing their drugs for chronic pain, infectious diseases and autoimmune diseases. They want to transform the risky world of biotech investing to help make innovative products, especially those being made in the Seattle area, more successful in the long-term. I chatted with Magness and Iadonato about why there's… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 7, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Annie Zak Source Type: news

Kineta wants to change biotech investing from 'a black box' to shorter, transparent model
Kineta, a Seattle-based company founded in 2008, is a different type of biotech. Its co-founders, CEO Charles Magness and Chief Scientific Officer Shawn Iadonato, aren't just focusing on developing their drugs for chronic pain, infectious diseases and autoimmune diseases. They want to transform the risky world of biotech investing to help make innovative products, especially those being made in the Seattle area, more successful in the long-term. I chatted with Magness and Iadonato about why there's… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 7, 2014 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Annie Zak Source Type: news

New Treatments, Guidelines, and the Microbiome at ACR 2014New Treatments, Guidelines, and the Microbiome at ACR 2014
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) meeting will feature cutting-edge research in ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, lupus, and the role of the microbiome in autoimmune diseases. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology News Source Type: news

One Good Reason To Stop Mocking Gluten-Free Diets
Going gluten-free is an ever-so-mockable decision, despite the fact that an estimated 18 million Americans suffer from some kind of gluten sensitivity that results in embarrassing and painful symptoms like gas, bloating, constipation and urgent diarrhea. Unlike celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disorder that damages the small intestines if gluten is present, there’s no blood test to confirm gluten sensitivity -- which contributes to even more skepticism about the condition. Gluten-free diets undertaken by people without celiac disease have been called the “new, cool eating disorder” or, more seriously, have bee...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One Good Reason To Stop Mocking Gluten-Free Diets
Going gluten-free is an ever-so-mockable decision, despite the fact that an estimated 18 million Americans suffer from some kind of gluten sensitivity that results in embarrassing and painful symptoms like gas, bloating, constipation and urgent diarrhea. Unlike celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disorder that damages the small intestines if gluten is present, there’s no blood test to confirm gluten sensitivity -- which contributes to even more skepticism about the condition. Gluten-free diets undertaken by people without celiac disease have been called the “new, cool eating disorder” or, more seriously, have bee...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 7, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Is This Bursitis?
Discussion Bursa are the body’s bumper pads for tendons. They are a small synovial fluid-filled sac that lies between tendon and a bone or skin. There are more than 150 of them in the body. With bursitis there can be thickening and proliferation of the synovial lining, bursal adhesions, chalky deposits and villus formation. Trauma, repetitive stress, infection and autoimmune usually are the reasons for bursitis but idiopathic etiology also occurs. The differential diagnosis includes infection, arthritis, tendonitis, tendon or ligament injury, fracture or neoplasm. The usual signs and symptoms are localized pain and t...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 3, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

‘Treasure in saliva’ may reveal deadly diseases early enough to treat them, UCLA scientists report
UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing — at an early stage — diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases. The study, the most comprehensive analysis ever conducted of RNA molecules in human saliva, reveals that saliva contains many of the same disease-revealing molecules that are contained in blood. It was published online today by the peer-reviewed journal Clinical Chemistry and will be published in the journal’s January 2015 special print issue, “Molecular Diagnostics: A Revolution in Progress.” “If we can define the boundaries of molecular t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 29, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In autoimmune diseases affecting millions, researchers pinpoint genetic risks, cellular culprits
Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans -- ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis (MS), to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma -- mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 29, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Advances in Graves' disease, including a new mouse model
A unique mouse model of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism, has been developed by scientists, and new research findings may help improve the treatment of Graves' disease, experts report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 29, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

'Treasure in saliva' may reveal deadly diseases early enough to treat them
(University of California - Los Angeles) UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing -- at an early stage -- diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases.The study, the most comprehensive analysis ever conducted of RNA molecules in human saliva, reveals that saliva contains many of the same disease-revealing molecules that are contained in blood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 29, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Wayne State research may develop next generation of vaccines against autoimmune diseas
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A major barrier to treating autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes is the lack of methods to deliver the therapeutics to specific sites such as the lymph nodes. A researcher in Wayne State University's College of Engineering is working to address this issue with a recently awarded a $475,752 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 27, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Gene identified for immune system reset after infection
(Duke University) Duke University researchers have uncovered the genes that are normally activated during recovery from bacterial infection. The finding, from C. elegans worms, could lead to ways to jumpstart this recovery process and possibly fend off autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory disorders that can result from the body staying in attack mode for too long. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 23, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

T1DM remission with sitagliptin
Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disease characterized by the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells in genetically susceptible subjects, which results in absolute insulin deficiency. Several agents used to reestablish immunological tolerance over the past few years have successfully prevented and even reverted T1DM in nonobese diabetic mice; however, these outcomes have not been achieved in humans.   Lima-Martinez et al. report on a case of a 19-year old male on intensive insulin treatment as he presented with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody positive and diabetic ketoacidos...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 21, 2014 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Interleukin-27: Can a cytokine with both pro & anti-inflammatory activity make a good drug target?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Interleukin-27, a member of the interleukin family of cytokines that help regulate the immune system, has a mainly anti-inflammatory role in the body, and its dysfunction has been implicated in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease. More recently, IL-27's proinflammatory activity and role in chronic inflammatory diseases is becoming increasingly clear, and a new Review article that explores the potential to target a range of diseases that share common IL-27-activated mechanisms is presented in. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 20, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news