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The evidence base for Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT): what can we believe?
The ' facts ' that most women and clinicians consider in making the decision to use, or not use, HRT are frequently wrong or incorrectly applied according to a professor. New research raises serious questions about the ' facts ' that have led women and their doctors to believe hormone therapy (often called HRT) is unsafe. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 13, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hormone replacement therapy reduces risk of early death
Women who use hormone replacement therapy have significantly decreased risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 66th Annual Scientific Session& Expo on 17 March.Telegraph (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 10, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Women who take HRT may live LONGER
Women who take hormone replacement therapy to cope with the symptoms of the menopause may live longer, research from California suggests. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hormone replacement therapy: Women on HRT 'likely to live LONGER'
WOMEN on hormone replacement therapy are likely to live longer, new research suggests. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Take hormone replacement therapy and you will live longer, women told
WOMEN on hormone replacement therapy are likely to live longer, according to new research. And those using HRT to relieve the symptoms of the menopause were also less likely to have potentially fatal blocked arteries. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Hormone replacement therapy may help improve women's heart health, overall survival
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) Hormone replacement therapy has long been controversial as studies have associated it with health benefits and risks. While some studies suggest that it lowers the risk of osteoporosis and improves some aspects of heart health, others link it to higher risk of cancer and stroke. Now, a new imaging study suggests that women using hormone replacement therapy to relieve menopause symptoms face a lower risk of death and show lower levels of atherosclerosis compared to women who do not use hormone therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Wide range of cancers now linked to being overweight
Conclusion The results of this study provide further evidence for the link between increasing levels of fat and the risk of developing certain cancers. There was strong evidence for nine cancers, with another two – ovarian cancer and stomach cancer – included when comparing obesity with healthy weight. This study is important in showing the significance of fat levels and obesity in cancer risk. But there are some important things to consider: The study doesn't tell us how excess body fat might play a role in the development of certain cancers, just that there's a link. Some studies might have been missed, as the ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Source Type: news

First hormone replacement therapy for parathyroid disorder
The European Medicines Agency has recommended granting a conditional marketing authorisation in the EU for an orphan medicine proposed as a treatment for chronic hypoparathyroidism, in patients poorly controlled using standard treatments.European Medicines Agency (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 27, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Taking hormone replacement therapy for at least 10 years 'can reduce dementia risk'
TAKING hormone replacement therapy for at least 10 years reduces the risk of dementia, according to new research. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Postmenopausal hormone therapy exceeding ten years may protect from dementia
Postmenopausal estrogen-based hormone therapy lasting longer than ten years was associated with a decreased risk of Alzheimer ' s disease in a large study. The study explored the association between postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy, Alzheimer ' s disease, dementia and cognition in two nation-wide case-control studies and two longitudinal cohort studies. The largest study comprised approximately 230,000 Finnish women and the follow-up time in different studies was up to 20 years. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Postmenopausal hormone therapy exceeding ten years may protect from dementia
(University of Eastern Finland) Postmenopausal estrogen-based hormone therapy lasting longer than ten years was associated with a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease in a large study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. The study explored the association between postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy, Alzheimer's disease, dementia and cognition in two nation-wide case-control studies and two longitudinal cohort studies. The largest study comprised approximately 230,000 Finnish women and the follow-up time in different studies was up to 20 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Scientists use stem cells to restore testosterone
Researchers have used stem cells to create testosterone-producing cells in rodents. This may provide an alternative to hormone replacement therapy. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stem Cell Research Source Type: news

Almost 20 percent of breast cancer patients fail to complete prescribed endocrine therapy
(European Society for Medical Oncology) Around 20 percent of breast cancer patients do not complete prescribed endocrine therapy, researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2016 Congress in Singapore. The study in over 5,500 women found that younger patients and those who had taken hormone replacement therapy were less likely to adhere to their medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 14, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stopping Hormone Replacement Therapy Doesn ' t Boost Hip Fractures Stopping Hormone Replacement Therapy Doesn ' t Boost Hip Fractures
Data from two large trials in the Woman ' s Health Initiative (WHI) suggest that stopping hormone replacement therapy (HRT) does not lead to a rebound increase in fracture risk.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - December 1, 2016 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

HRT Improves Bone Health in Young Menopausal Women HRT Improves Bone Health in Young Menopausal Women
Postmenopausal women taking hormone-replacement therapy have gains in bone-mineral density, mass, and structure, which persist for up to 2 years after treatment stops.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines)
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - November 28, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Growth Hormone Enhances Anaerobic Capacity Growth Hormone Enhances Anaerobic Capacity
Growth hormone replacement therapy may help improve physical function and quality of life among GH-deficient adults.Clinical Endocrinology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

Have YOU started menopause without knowing it? Most women do not know the symptoms of a common treatable condition that makes sex painful
Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) affects 45 per cent of over-40-year-olds. It is a typical side effect of the menopause, which can be treated with hormone replacement therapy to restore the thinning tissue. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Five Ways to Reduce Your Breast Cancer Risk
By Stacy Simon While you can’t change some breast cancer risk factors—family history and aging, for example—there are some risk factors that you can control. And while there is no sure way to prevent breast cancer, there are things you can do that may lower your risk. Here are 5 ways to help protect your breast health. 1. Watch your weight. Being overweight or obese increases breast cancer risk. This is especially true after menopause and for women who gain weight as adults. After menopause, most of your estrogen comes from fat tissue. Having more fat tissue can increase your chance of getting breast canc...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - October 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

Contraceptive pills not proven to protect against the flu
Conclusion These are interesting scientific findings but they have limited implications. Animal studies are useful for giving an indication of how biological processes may work in humans but we're not identical. Then the scenarios tested here – the progesterone, or the flu injection – can be taken as representative of real-life in humans. For one thing all the mice had surgery to remove their ovaries before being infected. It makes sense that the mice that had been given some additional recovery boost in the form of hormone replacement may have been in a better health state than those left hormone depleted. They wer...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

Risk for Breast Cancer With HRT Higher Than Thought? Risk for Breast Cancer With HRT Higher Than Thought?
Hormone replacement therapy with a combination of estrogen and progestogen triples the risk for breast cancer, a new study concludes.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - August 24, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Breast cancer risk from hormone replacement underestimated, study says
Stephen FellerLONDON, Aug. 23 (UPI) -- Women receiving combined hormone replacement therapy are at three times the risk for breast cancer as women receiving either estrogen-only HRT or tibolone. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Combined HRT breast cancer risk 'may have been underestimated'
Conclusion This study shows a link between the use of combined oestrogen and progesterone HRT and breast cancer risk, particularly among women who take the pill for a long period of time. But this is not the entire story. The study included a large cohort of women. The risk increase for combined HRT is based on only 52 of the 39,183 women taking the combined pill who developed breast cancer. Of these, only seven women had been taking the pill for more than 15 years. Therefore, the analysis was based on a very small number, which may mean the risk associations are not completely accurate. Assessments were based on s...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Older people Source Type: news

British study finds risk of breast cancer nearly tripled by combined HRT
2% of women monitored for six years got breast cancer – and they were 2.7 times more likely to contract it if they were on combined HRT than if they were notWomen who rely on the most commonly used form of hormone replacement therapy are roughly three times more likely to develop breast cancer than those who do not use it, according to a study whose results suggest the risk of illness has been previously understated.Those using the combined HRT therapy, a combination of oestrogen and progestogen, were running a risk 2.7 times greater than non-users, according to a study by scientists at the Institute of Cancer Research (...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 23, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Breast cancer Medical research Health Society Science The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) Women Source Type: news

Women's cancer risk may increase the longer they're obese
Conclusion This study adds to evidence that being overweight or obese for long periods of time may increase the risk of certain cancers, just as it increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The study's size and use of BMI measurements over time mean it is likely to be more reliable than smaller studies, or those that look at BMI only at one time point. The design allows researchers to look at how weight during a lifetime, rather than at one single point in life, may affect cancer risk. However, there are limitations. It's an observational study, so while researchers took account of known confounding facto...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Source Type: news

Menopause 'may mix up exercise reward pathways in the brain'
Conclusion This research uses an animal model of human menopause – surgically removing the ovaries – to see what effect this would have on rats bred to have either high or low exercise capacity.   As oestrogen has been shown to have an effect on dopamine activity in the brain's motivation centre, the researchers expected that ovary removal would have an effect on the rats' activity. However, what was unexpected was that having prior high exercise capacity seemed to give no protection – these rats seemed to decrease their activity much more than rats that had low activity to start with. These findings could be st...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Older people Neurology Source Type: news

Women who have ovaries removed to slash risk of cancer 'have a greater risk of dementia'
Researchers from Toronto University But said taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) pills may halt the cognitive decline in women after having their ovaries taken out. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women who go through the change earlier 'are more likely to die young'
However, hormone replacement therapy appears to have a rejuvenating effect, say the researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The extra curse of the Angelina gene: Women who have their ovaries removed to slash the risk of cancer 'have a greater risk of dementia'
Researchers from Toronto University But said taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) pills may halt the cognitive decline in women after having their ovaries taken out. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Going through the menopause? Hormone Replacement Therapy does NOT affect memory
HORMONE replacement therapy used by millions of women before and after the menopause does not impact memory, scientists have found. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause
5-year study found no difference in thinking skills, with or without estrogen treatment Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hormone Replacement Therapy, Memory, Menopause (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hormone Therapy Won ' t Help Memory After Menopause
5-year study found no difference in thinking skills, with or without estrogen treatment Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hormone Replacement Therapy, Memory, Menopause (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HRT May Up BMD in Premature Ovarian FailureHRT May Up BMD in Premature Ovarian Failure
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may be superior to the combined oral contraception pill (COCP) in increasing spinal bone density in women with spontaneous premature ovarian failure (POF), researchers in London, UK, report. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Benefits of Hormone Replacement Therapy
Image Source Who doesn't want to enjoy the whole life offered by God with full zest? However, it is only possible when one is at his best health. As the age increases, the body starts experiencing various kinds of hormonal changes which interfere with the normal functioning of the body as well as leading to diseases many a times. Some of the common problem faced by people due to hormonal misbalance includes weight gain, memory decline, fatigue, low libido, and aging appearance and muscle loss. With advancements in the field of medical science, now you don't need to bother anymore about these problems. Yes, it is curable n...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women’s Health Initiative may account for insomnia’s upward trend
DENVER – Much of the rising prevalence of insomnia among U.S. and Canadian adults may be driven by the sharp reduction in the use of hormone replacement therapy following the 2002 report from the... (Source: Clinical Endocrinology News)
Source: Clinical Endocrinology News - June 28, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Women’s Health Initiative may account for insomnia’s upward trend
DENVER – Much of the rising prevalence of insomnia among U.S. and Canadian adults may be driven by the sharp reduction in the use of hormone replacement therapy following the 2002 report from the... (Source: Clinical Neurology News)
Source: Clinical Neurology News - June 28, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Women’s Health Initiative may account for insomnia’s upward trend
DENVER – Much of the rising prevalence of insomnia among U.S. and Canadian adults may be driven by the sharp reduction in the use of hormone replacement therapy following the 2002 report from the... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - June 28, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Study suggests that inflammation is behind period pain
Conclusion This study found that middle-aged women with elevated CRP levels were more likely to report symptoms of PMS. The study had a good sample size, and represented a racially diverse and community-based sample of women who could be generalised to the US population of middle-aged women. However, there are a few points to bear in mind: It is unclear whether CRP levels were measured two weeks before a woman's period, so the results may differ, depending on the stage of the menstrual cycle. As the researchers acknowledge, some of the associations observed may have resulted from other exposures, such as anti-inflam...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Neurology Medication Source Type: news

Here’s something unexpected: Sunbathers live longer
This study detected an association between sun exposure and a lower frequency of certain causes of death; however, that’s not the same as proving that sun exposure was the cause of longer life. It could turn out that there is another explanation for these results that has little to do with sun exposure itself. For example, perhaps people with more sun exposure tend to be more active, smoke less, and have healthier diets. The researchers tried to account for other factors such as these in their analysis, but it’s always possible that something important was overlooked. The reason why more sun exposure might prolong life...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Healthy Aging Source Type: news

Migraines linked to increased heart disease risk in women
Conclusion This study shows a strong link between migraine and cardiovascular disease, extending the link already found between migraine and stroke. However, many questions remain. We don't know if the results are relevant to men who have migraines, as all the people in the study were women. We also don't know if the results apply to non-white populations, as most of the women in the study were white. Previous studies on stroke have shown that the group at highest risk is who get an "aura" before a migraine – sensation(s) that tells them the migraine is on its way. But this study did not ask people about aura...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news

Prescribing hormone replacement therapy
What to consider when prescribing HRT to treat symptoms of menopaus, including six questions to ask, a treatment pathway and simple formulary, and three case studies to test GPs' awareness of appropriate prescribing options. (Source: GP Online Education)
Source: GP Online Education - May 25, 2016 Category: Primary Care Tags: 10.1 Women's Health Source Type: news

Reader Poll: How Early Do You Start Your Patients on HRT?Reader Poll: How Early Do You Start Your Patients on HRT?
A new study suggests that timing of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may influence a menopausal woman’s risk of developing heart disease. Will it change how you prescribe HRT? Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Medical news: A case for skepticism
When you read medical news, do you ever get drawn in by the headline only to find the details deliver something quite different (or less) than expected? Or do the findings sound so dramatic that you wonder whether the results might be exaggerated or misleading? If you answered yes, I’m with you. The reasons to be skeptical are many. And it’s not that there are evil people out there deliberately trying to mislead you — well, there are a few of those, but only a few. Pressures on those that bring us health news make it almost certain that at times, information will be biased, incomplete, or flat-out wrong. I’m not ta...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - April 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Health care Medical Research Source Type: news

Can HRT in early menopause cut heart disease risk?
ConclusionThis double-blind RCT found that women taking HRT less than six years after the menopause had slower artery wall thickening than those taking a placebo. This represented the main measure of atherosclerosis progression tested; other measures showed no difference, so the results were not as conclusive as they could have been. Women taking HRT 10 or more years after menopause also showed no difference in atherosclerosis progression compared with a placebo, further complicating the picture.An important limitation of this study is the lack of a patient relevant endpoint, such as cardiovascular events or mortality. Pre...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

Menopause hormone clot risk lower for vaginal creams and skin patches
(Reuters Health) - Women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to ease menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats may have a lower risk of blood clots if they use estrogens applied vaginally or via skin patches, a Swedish study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Possible heart benefits of taking oestrogen get another look
A study in the New England Journal of Medicine investigates the link between the timing of hormone replacement therapy and atherosclerotic health. NPR (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 31, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Hot flush menopause misery could be over due to new wonder pill
Developed by a team at Imperial College, London, the new treatment works completely differently from hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The ‘very important’ advance could improve millions of lives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New treatment for hot flushes could improve lives of millions
Some women can experience up to 30 hot flushes in a 24-hour period, seriously disrupting their sleep, relationships and work (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - March 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: menopause hot flushes Imperial College London hormone replacement therapy HRT Source Type: news

Talc and ovarian cancer: what the most recent evidence shows
Conclusion This case-control study aimed to investigate the association between talc use and ovarian cancer. The researchers found a significant link between genital talc use and ovarian cancer – an increase in risk of a third, compared with no use. However, the study has important limitations and is not able to prove direct cause and effect. Although this was a case-control study that made use of data collected as part of an ongoing cohort study, talc use only seems to have been assessed after cancer diagnosis.  The study says that, "subjects were personally interviewed about potential ovarian cancer risk factor...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Talcum Powder: Just How Much Risk Does It Pose?
Johnson & Johnson is a trusted name whose baby powder has long been a staple of many homes. The powder absorbs excess moisture and protects skin from chafing and irritating rashes. Women in particular use it as a part of feminine hygiene. Now we are being told that this household item could be linked to cancer. Johnson & Johnson just lost a huge lawsuit brought by the family of a woman who died of ovarian cancer after years of using the product. The decision wasn't actually based on hard evidence of a known link between talc and ovarian cancer, leading to a lot of confusion for consumers. Baby powder's main ingredient ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Worsening Migraine During HRT Tied to Increased Stroke Risk Worsening Migraine During HRT Tied to Increased Stroke Risk
Women who have worsening migraines while receiving hormone replacement therapy are at increased risk for ischemic stroke, new research suggests. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - February 18, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news