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Astronaut Captures Stunning GoPro Footage During Spacewalk
Walking in space is a kind of slow-motion skydiving. An orbit, after all, is nothing but a free fall — albeit one in which the Earth keeps curving away from you so you never hit ground. And spacewalks are actually much more dangerous than skydiving, what with the risk of a spacesuit failure or a micrometeor hit or a breakaway piece of equipment that may have no weight in space, but has more than enough mass and momentum to crush you flat. But spacewalks are gorgeous too, as was demonstrated anew on March 24 — and captured here in GoPro video released to TIME from NASA. On what was a Friday morning work day for ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized esa international space station Kimbrough NASA Pesquet spacewalk video Source Type: news

OHSU doctor gets $2M grant to reduce low-value care
An Oregon Health& Science University doctor and researcher was awarded a $2 million grant to attack the problem of wasteful spending in the health care system. Dr. Vinay Prasad will use the funding from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation to delve into tests and treatments that are contradicted by reliable evidence, with a goal of reducing the use of low-value care. Prasad will be required under the three-year grant to share his findings on a public we bsite and to develop teaching modules that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 29, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Where Levees Fail In California, Nature Can Step In To Nurture Rivers
After devastating floods, California is looking to spend billions on dams and levees. Some are calling for a new approach to flood control, one that mimics nature instead of trying to contain it.(Image credit: Lauren Sommer/KQED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lauren Sommer Source Type: news

Launch, Land, Launch — SpaceX Tries Reusing Its Rocket
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Fishermen Catch 50-Pound Carp In The Middle Of Los Angeles
MacArthur Park in Los Angeles is not the most picturesque location, but it is where the California Ghetto Carping Club caught a 50 pound carp this week.(Image credit: Eddie Salmeron) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Greg Dixon Source Type: news

EPA Decides Not To Ban A Pesticide, Despite Its Own Evidence Of Risk
New EPA administrator Scott Pruitt has decided not to ban chlorpyrifos, a pesticide widely used on produce. That's despite evidence previously compiled by EPA showing it could pose risks to consumers.(Image credit: Jim West/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

NIH cuts might cause 40 years of pain, Bentley study says
Massachusetts researchers say the effects of slashing funding for the National Institutes of Health could have negative impacts on scientific discovery for decades. Researchers at Bentley University reported in a study published this week in the science journal Plus One that it takes over a decade and upward of 40 years for the discoveries coming from basic research to fuel commercial drugs and technologies. With currently budgetary proposals set to slash th e $32 billion NIH budget by nearly 20… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 29, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

NIH cuts might cause 40 years of pain, Bentley study says
Massachusetts researchers say the effects of slashing funding for the National Institutes of Health could have negative impacts on scientific discovery for decades. Researchers at Bentley University reported in a study published this week in the science journal Plus One that it takes over a decade and upward of 40 years for the discoveries coming from basic research to fuel commercial drugs and technologies. With currently budgetary proposals set to slash th e $32 billion NIH budget by nearly 20… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 29, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Thousands of pollution deaths worldwide linked to western consumers – study
Study shows extent to which US and western European demand for clothes, toys and mobile phones contributes to air pollution in developing countriesWestern consumers who buy cheap imported toys, clothes and mobile phones are indirectly contributing to tens of thousands of pollution-related deaths in the countries where the goods are produced, according to a landmark study.Nearly 3.5 million people die prematurely each year due to air pollution, the research estimates, and about 22% of these deaths are associated with goods and services that were produced in one region for consumption in another.Continue reading... (Source: ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Pollution Environment Science Health Society Source Type: news

Poor outlook for biodiversity in Antarctica
The popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world has been brought into question in a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

NSF and Popular Science announce winners of 15th annual 'Vizzies'
Today, Popular Science magazine and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announce the winners of the 15th Annual Vizzies Challenge, celebrating the use of visual media to artfully and clearly communicate scientific data and research. The competition recognizes the best photographs, videos, illustrations, interactive apps, and posters and graphics produced by academic researchers, artists or hobbyists. "Congratulations to all of this year's winners, and for everyone ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=191453&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny
Corbiculate bees and their gut-dwelling microbes have been coevolving since the social species evolved from their solitary ancestors around 80 million years ago, scientists suggest.  (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News, News & Opinion Source Type: news

New Research Delivers Hope For More Accurate PTSD Diagnosis And Treatment
Jacob Fadley served four years and 12 tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, repeatedly exposed to heart-thumping blasts. “It’s just like an entire force is being pushed through you, something powerful too,” he described. “Your body just kind of stops and goes, ‘What, what is going on?’ And kind of, for me, it felt like it was rebooting itself.” At the end of it, he was left with no apparent physical injuries. But something was very wrong inside his head. “I came back home from my third deployment. I cried, like, all the time,” he recalls. “I would get drunk, and the nigh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Biology explains why men kill big game like Cecil the lion — and how that behavior might be stopped
Why do some humans engage in expensive ventures to hunt lions, elephants and other big-game species that often are endangered or otherwise threatened?The cost, according to a trio of scientists, is exactly the point: These pricey big-game hunts are meant to show off men ’s high social status to... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Yale students collaborate on a prize-winning virtual reality film
For her senior project, Yale undergraduate Celine Tien ’17 wanted to create a film that pushed the boundaries in storytelling. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

UN strategy for eliminating HIV in sub-Saharan Africa is unfeasible, according to UCLA study
Effective care and prevention strategies have managed to reduce the spread of HIV in the U.S. and other resource-rich countries. But in sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 25 million are infected, the epidemic rages — as does the debate over how to stop it.The World Health Organization and UNAIDS have proposed using “treatment as prevention” to eliminate HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. The strategy would treat people infected with HIV to reduce their ability to infect others as a way to prevent them from transmitting the infection. UNAIDS has set goals to diagnose 90 percent of HIV-infected people and to treat 9 0 percent...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Childhood Lead Exposure Can Change The Course Of A Life
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teach evolution – but not in a moral vacuum | Letters
Jules Howard writes that teaching evolution from an early age would help combat racism and promote humanist values (Utopian thinking: Forget British Values – teach children they are apes, theguardian.com, 27 March), but this is not borne out by experience. Most early evolutionists were racist, Darwin included. Some of the most brilliant evolutionary theorists, such as Francis Galton and Ronald Fisher, were strong proponents of eugenics. That this strand of thinking is mostly abandoned in today ’s mainstream evolutionary biology is reassuring, but does not stem from any particular scientific finding. Rather, it was the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Evolution Biology Science Charles Darwin Animals World news Race issues Feminism Women Source Type: news

Can playing Tetris help prevent PTSD?
Conclusion Involvement in a traumatic event such as a traffic accident can have long-lasting effects on mental health. Some people have months or years of distressing, intrusive flash-backs, feelings of guilt or helplessness, anxiety and depression. At present, there are no treatments that can be given straight away to prevent such long-term effects. The lack of long-term effects in the study results mean we need to be cautious about claims that playing Tetris could "prevent" PTSD. Limitations of the study – such as an untested control intervention, and the relatively small number of participants – mean this ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental health Source Type: news

Yale People: Junior ’s passion for science leads to seven patent applications — the first at age 12
Today, junior Samantha Marquez ' s seventh grade science project has earned her multiple accolades and seven patent applications. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

For microbes fighting viruses, a fast response means a better defense
Researchers have found that the bacterial immune system targets an invading virus as soon as it enters the cell. This discovery answers a long-standing question about how microbes defend themselves. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 29, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News CRISPR CRISPR-Cas9 immunology Joshua W. Modell Laboratory of Bacteriology Luciano Marraffini microbiology spacer acquisition Virology Source Type: news

US heroin use has increased almost fivefold in a decade, study shows
Researchers say increase is seen across all social groups, ages and sexes and highlight link between misuse of prescription opioids and heroin abuseHeroin use among American adults has increased almost fivefold in the last decade, according to a study based on a survey of almost 80,000 people.Researchers found that just after the turn of the millennium, 0.33% of the adult population reported having used heroin at some point in their life, but 10 years later it had risen to 1.6% – a figure corresponding to about 3.8m Americans.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Drugs Society Drugs policy Psychiatry US news Science Source Type: news

Here's what gives kingsnakes the edge in snake-to-snake combat
Nature draws a pretty clear distinction between predators and the things they eat: Predators are bigger than their prey.Except no one told the kingsnake.Kingsnakes squeeze their prey to death, are immune to rattlesnake venom and are so named for their astonishing ability to overpower and eat... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

Book: Life on Ice
YaleNews features works recently or soon to be published by members of the University community. Descriptions are based on material provided by the publishers. Authors of new books may forward publishers ’ book descriptions to us by email. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

HPV Vaccine Could Protect More People With Fewer Doses, Doctors Insist
In the U.S., there are about 39,000 cancers associated with the human papillomavirus each year. Doctors say the new HPV vaccine may help reduce the number of cases.(Image credit: Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michelle Andrews Source Type: news

Finding a ‘lost’ planet, about the size of Neptune
Yale astronomers have discovered a “lost” planet that is nearly the size of Neptune and tucked away in a solar system 3,000 light years from Earth. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

Conflict between the sexes maintains diversity in brain hormones
A study published inProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that alleles that are beneficial to the reproductive success of females are detrimental to the success of males.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 29, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Vigorous exercise may help boost kids' cardiometabolic health
Ten minutes a day of high-intensity physical activity could help some children reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases, according to an international study published inMedicine& Science in Sports& Exercise.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 29, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Nitrogen foraging ability of plants relies on mobile shoot-root hormone signal
A new study published inNature Plants describes the molecular mechanisms underlying the shoot-to-root stage of nitrogen-demand signaling in plants.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 29, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Volunteers needed for the Biology Big Top summer events!
Get out of the lecture theatre/lab/hospital for a day of fun, interactive science– an opportunity to increase awareness about your work, whilst adding science communication experience to your CV! The Society for Endocrinology is looking for volunteers from all career stages to help out at two different events taking place this summer:Lancashire Science Festival - This event explores all things STEM during a three-day event in Central Lancashire which hosted over 200 events last year.Where:The University of Central Lancashire’s Preston CampusWhen:29 June– 1 July 2017Lambeth Country Show - Being...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 29, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

It's a riot: the stressful AI simulation built to understand your emotions
Inspired by global unrest, Riot uses artificial intelligence, film and gaming technologies to help unpick how people react in stressful situationsAn immersive film project is attempting to understand how people react in stressful situations by using artificial intelligence (AI), film and gaming technologies to place participants inside a simulated riot and then detecting their emotions in real time.Called Riot, the project is the result of a collaboration between award winning multidisciplinary immersive filmmaker Karen Palmer and Professor Hongying Meng from Brunel University. The two have worked together previously onSyn...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Katy Vans Tags: Psychology Artificial intelligence (AI) Science Technology Games Consciousness Computing Neuroscience Source Type: news

FAKE SCIENCE on parade as exact opposite news headlines appear right next to each other, citing the exact same study
(Natural News) A breakthrough scientific study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association says that vitamin D supplements are totally useless at preventing cancer. Yet the exact same study also provides compelling evidence that vitamin D supplements are highly effective at preventing cancer, according to the study’s own authors. What’s going on here?... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Altmetric Badges for Books Adopted by The MIT Press Providing New Attention Insights for Authors, Editors and Readers
Data science company Altmetric today announced that The MIT Press has integrated Altmetric Badges for Books into its book pages. Visitors will be provided with an at-a-glance summary of the online attention relating to all of their monograph titles, discovering for the first time the broader engagement from key audiences and stakeholders.   Users are able to click on the Altmetric badges on The MIT Press site to view the associated details page for each item. The Altmetric details pages include: A summary and full break-down of all of the mentions and shares that Altmetric has tracked from sources such as the ma...
Source: News from STM - March 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Source Type: news

Catnip to cat lovers everywhere: your fluffy friend loves you right back | Fay Schopen
Research has shown that cats love human company above all else. That may be news to some – but not to me and my loyal, sociable sidekickIn very important news:cats are nice. Yes, that ’s right – forget aboutLegs-it; purge your mind of Trump ’s climate change idiocy (if only) and don’t worry about the axing of yourgluten-free bread prescription. Just turn to your nearest source of feline fluff (try a friend, neighbour or simply venture on to the street if you find yourself devoid of cat) and say “ahhhh”.Related:Readers' prize winning pictures of catsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fay Schopen Tags: Cats Animals Pets Life and style Animal behaviour Biology Science UK news Dogs Source Type: news

Passengers Take Flight To View Southern Lights
The Aurora Australis is a display of neon green lights that dance across the southern skies. A plane took off from New Zealand to get a special view. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Who Want To Study Climate Engineering Shun Trump
The controversial study of climate engineering — aka deliberately messing with Earth's temperature — was finally starting to regain a measure of respectability. And then came President Trump.(Image credit: Pixza/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Measuring The Impact Of Rolling Back Environmental Regulations
President Trump's environmental order proposes rolling back regulations. David Greene speaks with John Larsen of the Rhodium Group about the impact those rollbacks could have on emissions levels. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Paralysed man moves arm using power of thought in world first
Neuroprosthetic procedure first in world to restore brain-controlled reaching and grasping in man paralysed from the neck downA man who was paralysed from below the neck after crashing his bike into a truck can once again drink a cup of coffee and eat mashed potato with a fork, after a world-first procedure to allow him to control his hand with the power of thought.Bill Kochevar, 53, has had electrical implants in the motor cortex of his brain and sensors inserted in his forearm, which allow the muscles of his arm and hand to be stimulated in response to signals from his brain, decoded by computer. After eight years, he is...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Disability Health Society Source Type: news

Law of physics explains natural drivers of wealth inequality
A engineering professor has proposed an explanation for why the income disparity in America between the rich and poor continues to grow. According to the constructal law of physics, income inequality naturally grows along with the economy. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Active Partners in Research
As companies increasingly integrate patient input into their R&D activities, they are coming to realize that they must also forge strong partnerships with patients and their families if they are to deliver truly patient-centered care. Yet, how do you transform buzzwords like patient engagement, patient voices, patient partnerships from theory into practice?It starts with being more systematic, says Danielle Gerlag, Patient Engagement Lead at  GlaxoSmithKline. “Over the last 10-15 years, we’ve done a lot to get the patient’s voice heard within GSK and there are pockets of excellence where we have engaged with pat...
Source: EyeForPharma - March 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Deirdre Coleman Source Type: news

Bristol physicist takes up senior role in CERN project
A particle physicist from the University of Bristol has been appointed to a senior role at one of the largest and most prestigious scientific projects in the world. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, International, Announcements; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Physics; Press Release Source Type: news

A New Kind Of March Madness Hits Schools
It's March Mammal Madness, a bracket with real animals facing off in fictional battles. Hundreds of science classes are playing in schools around the country.(Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kat Lonsdorf Source Type: news

Over € 9M in European grants awarded to Bristol academics
The European Research Council (ERC) will award a total of € 9M in grants to Bristol academics under its Advanced Grant scheme. These grants support exceptional, professorial-level research leaders in undertaking ground-breaking, high-impact research projects. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, Announcements, Grants and Awards; Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Law; Press Release Source Type: news

3 Storm Chasers Killed In Car Crash As They Pursued Texas Tornado
Storm chasers pursuing a tornado collided at an intersection in Texas on Tuesday, killing three.  Two of the storm chasers, Weather Channel contractors Kelley Gene Williamson, 57, and Randall Delane Yarnall, 55, were in a Chevrolet Suburban live-streaming their pursuit of the storm when the feed cut out as they reached a rural intersection outside of Spur.  Spur is about 60 miles east of Lubbock.  Police said Williamson ran a stop sign and hit a Jeep driven by 25-year-old Corbin Lee Jaeger, who was also chasing the storm, according to KWCH. Williamson, who was not wearing a seatbelt, was ejected from the veh...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Are you sitting comfortably? Then we'll begin the evolutionary 'fairytale' of coral
Science storytelling could be the way forward for science communication, so for your edification here ’s the story of the Three Little Corals ...Science and storytelling don ’t seem like obvious bedfellows but recently there’s been a serious vein of science communication research that suggests a strong narrative can help withdissemination,understanding by nonexperts and number one for most publishing scientists,citations. Of course,sciencing the art of storytelling, with narrativity indices and reader appeal charts does sound typically soul-suckingly dry, but it is at the heart of the science communication movement a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mark Carnall Tags: Science Fossils Evolution Biology Coral Marine life Source Type: news

The first woman in space: 'People shouldn ’t waste money on wars'
In 1963 Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman to go into space. On her 80th birthday, she looks back at a lifetime of immense political changeParachuting was her first love. The moment she could, Valentina Tereshkova joined the renowned paramilitary flying club in her native Yaroslavl (without telling her mother) and trained almost every weekend. She has more than 90 jumps under her belt. “I did night jumps, too, on to land and water – the Volga river.” Day and night, she tells me, “it’s a very different experience, but both are wonderful”, and she spreads her arms wide as though balancing herself in flig...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mary Dejevsky Tags: Global development professionals network Russia Space Women Science World news Source Type: news

Jane Goodall Says Trump’s Efforts To Derail Climate Action Are ‘Immensely Depressing'
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON — In the face of enormous environmental challenges, including climate change and a biodiversity crisis, J...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

IUPUI researcher lays groundwork for new ways to prevent youth violence in Caribbean
(Indiana University) A study by an Indiana University School of Social Work associate professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has laid the groundwork for new strategies dealing with youth violence in five Caribbean countries (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Building trust, not hate
(Hokkaido University) When anonymity between people is lifted, they more likely cooperate with each other. Playing nice can thereby become a winning strategy, an international team of scientists shows in a study to be published in Science Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The search for obesity drugs targets hunger's complex chemistry
(American Chemical Society) Discoveries of hormones related to weight and appetite in the '90s helped spur a search for obesity treatments targeting those hormones -- with disappointing results. Now scientists are taking a new tack that could finally yield promising treatments, according to a story in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN) that was produced in collaboration with the American Chemical Society's open-access journal ACS Central Science. C&EN is the weekly newsmagazine of ACS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news