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F1000 announces partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
F1000, a provider of a suite of services to support researchers, institutions and funders, has announced a partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to launch an open research publishing platform. Due to launch in the third quarter of 2017, Gates Open Research (https://gatesopenresearch.org) will be a new publishing option that will increase the speed and transparency of scholarly publishing by Gates-funded researchers. Gates Open Research will use services developed by F1000 and follow the same publishing model that has been established for F1000Research over the past four years and adopted by Wellcome Open...
Source: News from STM - March 24, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

The Government Just Funded The Biggest Long-Term Study Of Black Cancer Survivors
This study has the potential to be pathbreaking because it appreciates that people are complex and much more affects outcomes than whether a cancer patient receives Drug A or Drug B,” he said. Homogenous clinical trials are bigger than cancer It’s not just cancer research that skews white. For instance, less than 5 percent of participants were black in five of seven “mega-trials” of Type 2 diabetes drugs, according to an article published in Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology in January. Yet black Americans are nearly twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as white Americans. Part ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Purging the body of 'retired' cells could reverse ageing, study shows
Findings raise possibility that a future therapy that rids the body of senescent cells might protect against the ravages of old agePurging retired cells from the body has been shown to undo the ravages of old age in a study that raises the prospect of new life-extending treatments .When mice were treated with a substance designed to sweep away cells that have entered a dormant state due to DNA damage their fur regrew, kidney function improved and they were able to run twice as far as untreated elderly animals.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Ageing Science Medical research Biology Source Type: news

MARC U-STAR Program Applicants Webinar Slides [PDF, 671KB]
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 23, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Moderate drinking may reduce heart disease risk
Conclusion This study paints a more complicated picture than the "Pint a day keeps the doctor away" story proffered by The Sun. It seems to confirm the findings of other studies, which have shown that non-drinkers tend to have a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than people who drink moderately. It suggests that some cardiovascular diseases (mainly those directly affecting the heart) seem to have a stronger link to a possible protective effect from alcohol than other vascular diseases, such as mini-strokes and bleeding in the brain. However, this can't be concluded with certainty due to the study design. We ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Decades of TB progress threatened by drug-resistant bacteria, warn experts
Rise of multi-drug resistant strains of tuberculosis could derail global efforts to eradicate the disease, according to a new reportThe rise of multi-drug resistant bacteria threatens to overturn decades of progress ontuberculosis (TB), experts are warning.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Tuberculosis Drug resistance Medical research Health Society Science Antibiotics Source Type: news

Federal research cuts could have huge impact on WNY
Federal funding for medical research has functional everyday importance to Buffalo businesses and residents. That's why a specific proposal in President Donald Trump's first budget document is causing concern. The "skinny budget," as it's called, proposes to cut National Institutes of Health research funding by $5.8 billion, or 18 percent. NiH funding supports most of the basic medical research at the U niversity at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute, where scientists work on ways to improve… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 23, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Dan Miner Source Type: news

FDA Links Breast Implants To Deaths From Rare Type Of Cancer
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Nine women have died of a rare type of lymphoma that Food and Drug Administration officials now say may be caused by breas...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moderate drinking can lower risk of heart attack, says study
Drinking in moderation helps protect heart, with study finding it lowers risk of many conditions compared with not drinkingModerate drinking can lower the risk of several heart conditions, according to a study that will further fuel the debate about the health implications of alcohol consumption.The study of 1.93 million people in the UK aged over 30 found that drinking in moderation – defined as consuming no more than 14 units of alcohol a week – had a protective effect on the heart compared with not drinking.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Alcohol Society Health UK news Medical research Heart attack Science Source Type: news

Three I ’s & Biosecurity Conference: April 19-21, Providence, RI
The Three I ’s& Biosecurity Conference: Creating Connections, Sharing Solutions& Building Strategies  will be held April 19-21, 2017, in Providence, RI. This conference is designed for compliance officers and specialists, research oversight officials, general and legal counsel, government relations professionals, policy directors, and security professionals. (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - March 22, 2017 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

The pill provides 'lifelong protection against some cancers'
Conclusion The research is in line with other studies that have reported on cancer risk and the pill. This study had the advantage of being both very large and having the longest follow-up period of any study of the effects of the pill on cancer. But we shouldn't lose sight of this study's limitations. It's not possible to say that taking the pill prevented women from getting certain cancers. It may be the case, but other confounding factors could be involved. The researchers took account of some basic factors that affect cancer risk, but not others like diet, physical exercise, weight and alcohol use. Many of the wom...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

New Alzheimer's test can predict age when disease will appear
Test based on 31 genetic markers could be used to calculate any individual ’s yearly risk for onset of diseaseScientists have developed a new genetic test for Alzheimer ’s risk that can be used to predict the age at which a person will develop the disease.A high score on the test, which is based on 31 genetic markers, can translate to being diagnosed many years earlier than those with a low-risk genetic profile, the study found. Those ranked in the top 10% in terms of risk were more than three times as likely to develop Alzheimer ’s during the course of the study, and did so more than a decade before those who ranked...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Alzheimer's UK news Medical research Science Health Society Source Type: news

Womb cancer risk grows with extra waist weight, study suggests
Every increase of 0.1 units in the ratio between waist and hip raises the risk of developing the disease by 21%, researchers sayWomen who have a higher waist to hip ratio could have an increased risk of womb cancer, a study suggests.Researchers writing in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) found that for every increase of 0.1 units in the ratio between waist and hip, the risk of developing the disease increased by 21%.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Cancer Health Obesity Cancer research Science Society Women Medical research Source Type: news

Women's Wellness: Sex and gender in medical research
Transforming medical practice through sex and gender-based research has been the focus of physiologist and surgical researcher Virginia Miller's?work for over twenty-five years. She says we're at a unique place in history where we have an opportunity to change the way medicine is practiced. Dr. Miller directs the Women's Health Research Center and she wrote [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 22, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Using a Smartphone to Screen for Male Infertility
Easy-to-use smartphone app and accessory analyzes sperm concentration and motility with ~98 percent accuracy. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - March 22, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Deadly spider venom could ward off stroke brain damage, say doctors
Ingredient in funnel web spider venom can protect cells from being destroyed by a stroke, even when given hours after the event, study showsDoctors have stumbled on an unlikely source for a drug to ward off brain damage caused by strokes: the venom of one of the deadliest spiders in the world.A bite from an Australian funnel web spider cankill a human in 15 minutes, but a harmless ingredient found in the venom can protect brain cells from being destroyed by a stroke, even when given hours after the event, scientists say.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Science Society Spiders Stroke Source Type: news

The role of industry in childhood cancers | Letters
With childhood cancer being a controlling factor in tackling daily life, and having been forced to defy a very poor prognosis myself, I feel a need to respond to your letter about Brexit ’s impact on children with cancer (14 March). Glenis Wilmott MEP states that 1,700 children are diagnosed with cancer, of which over 250 die, annually in the UK, and that their only chance of survival may lie with being on a clinical trial, due to lack of treatments.Cancer treatment is dreaded by adults, but is much worse for a child, with the consequences of treatment often casting a shadow for the rest of their lives. With a 40% increa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Cancer Health Society Cancer research Medical research Science Biology Environment Pollution Source Type: news

Actin ’s Many Roles on Biomedical Beat
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 20, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

SCORE Directory of Active Awards [PDF, 1.13MB]
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 20, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Advertising by some Manitoba chiropractors undermines public health, expert says
A CBC News analysis of the company websites and Facebook pages of every registered chiropractor in Manitoba found several dozen examples of statements, claims and social media content at odds with many public health policies or medical research. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news

Acc17 re-circuit
ACC17 RE-CIRCUIT (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - March 19, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Haunted by the mystery deaths in Nicaragua ’s brutal sugarcane fields
Kidney disease has killed 20,000 agricultural workers, but no one knows whyTwo brothers stand in a dusty alley in the town of Chichigalpa in Nicaragua. They stare with suspicion atAustralian photographer Josh Mcdonald, who has just captured their image – a picture that won aWellcome Image awardlast week for its depiction of the impact of a medical condition that has been devastating the male population of central America.The illness is described as “chronic kidney disease of undetermined cause ” and it is responsible for 75% of deaths of young and middle-aged men in Nicaragua. Workers in the sugarcane industry are wo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Observer science editor Tags: Nicaragua Medical research Science Photography World news Source Type: news

Toshiba gets FDA nod for Aplio cardiac US scanner
Toshiba America Medical Solutions has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Toshiba launches service program DOD awards Toshiba purchasing contract Toshiba Medical Research to build center in Baltimore Canon completes acquisition of Toshiba Medical New MRI, CT scanners pace Toshiba RSNA launches (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 17, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

ICARE Train the Trainer Institute: May 1-4, Seattle, WA
An Interagency Collaborative Animal Research Education (ICARE) Train the Trainer Institute will be held May 1-4, 2017, in Seattle, WA.Register Here! About the Train the Trainer Institutes (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - March 17, 2017 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

How Does Trump ' s Plan To Gut Health And Medical Research Make America Great?
Trump ' s budget proposal would decimate NIH, biomedical research and emergency preparedness, hurt the economy, and destroy our innovation and research. How does this MAGA? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Judy Stone, Contributor Source Type: news

Empagliflozin chronic heart failure outcome trials initiated
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - March 17, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

PCSK9 Inhibitor Evolocumab Significantly Reduces Adverse Cardiovascular Events When Added to Statin Therapy With No Major Safety Concerns
In patients with cardiovascular disease, evolocumab reduced LDL cholesterol by 59 percent and reduced the risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes with greater benefit the longer the duration of therapy. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - March 17, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

First UK licence to create three-person baby granted by fertility regulator
IVF technique uses DNA from three people to prevent genetic diseases being passed on, and could be offered by Newcastle clinic from this summerDoctors in Newcastle have been granted permission to use the three-person baby fertility technique to prevent incurable genetic diseases being inherited by children.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Reproduction Genetics Embryos Biology Science UK news Pregnancy Medical research Source Type: news

Webinar for Students and Fellows Interested in NIGMS ’ Postdoctoral Research Associate (PRAT) Program on Feedback Loop
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 16, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Trump Administration Proposes Big Cuts In Medical Research
The National Institutes of Health, which funds research in treatments and cures, could lose 20 percent of its budget under the administration's proposal. More money would go for addiction treatment.(Image credit: NIH/Flickr) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Joe Biden: 'There's Something Really Wrong' When We're Celebrating Bipartisanship
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON — Former Vice President Joe Biden has received three separate awards for his bipartisanship and civility ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Joe Biden: 'There's Something Really Wrong' When We're Celebrating Bipartisanship
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON — Former Vice President Joe Biden has received three separate awards for his bipartisanship and civility ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First licence to create three-person baby granted by UK fertility regulator
Doctors at a Newcastle clinic have been given the first licence to create babies with DNA from three peopleDoctors in Newcastle have been granted permission to use the three-person baby fertility technique, which can prevent incurable genetic diseases being inherited by children.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Reproduction Genetics Embryos Biology Science UK news Pregnancy Medical research Source Type: news

Three women with eye disease blinded by unproven stem cell treatment
Florida case an example of growing ‘wanton misapplication of cellular therapy’, says dean of Harvard Medical SchoolThree women were left nearly or totally blind by a vision treatment at a stem cell clinic, in what doctors called a dramatic illustration of how risky such clinics can be.“These women had fairly functional vision prior to the procedure ... and were blinded by the next day,” said ophthalmologist Dr Thomas Albini of the University of Miami, whose team examined the women after their treatment at a clinic in Florida.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Stem cells US news Medical research Science World news Source Type: news

Kidney disease: Over HALF of Britons 'unaware they are showing signs of killer illness'
NEW medical research reveals over half of Britons are blissfully unaware they are already showing subtle signs of deadly kidney disease. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

58 Million Americans are Exposed to Loud, Frequent Noises, Including Firearms, at Work and Home
Study finds substantial noise exposures, with potentially serious long-term hearing health consequences, frequently occur in occupational and recreational settings (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - March 16, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

58 Million Americans are Exposed to Loud, Frequent Noises,
Study finds substantial noise exposures, with potentially serious long-term hearing health consequences, (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - March 16, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Suggested Timeline for Application to the PRAT Program
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 15, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists Are Racing to Prevent a Total Wipeout of the World ’s Coral Reefs
(SOUTH ARI ATOLL, Maldives) — There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What’s left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe. The world has lost roughly half its coral reefs in the last 30 years. Scientists are now scrambling to ensure that at least a fraction of these unique ecosystems survives beyond the next three decades. The health of the planet depends on it: Coral reefs support a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elena Becatoros / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change Conservation Coral Reefs Environment Marine research onetime Source Type: news

Study details risks of death following ischemic or bleeding events more than one year after coronary stenting
A study by a multi-institutional research team has tracked the long-term incidence of death following ischemic and bleeding events occurring in patients more than one year after placement of a coronary stent. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - March 15, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Putting Autoimmune Disease Genetic Links to the Test
Investigators took approximately 270 genetic loci associated with seven diseases and tried to map them back to causal genes using eQTLs in key immune cells. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - March 15, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Close cancer loophole now to save children ’s lives | Letters
Children and young people are being denied the latest cancer treatments by outdated European regulations. Pharmaceutical companies are able to use a loophole in EU legislation to avoid trialling cancer drugs in children – despite evidence that these treatments could work. An analysis of European Medicines Agency data by the Institute of Cancer Research shows that since 2012, the loophole has been enacted to prevent 33 new cancer drugs from being evaluated in children. There is evidence that at least some of these treatments could be effective against children’s cancers.Children ’s cancers are rare, and there is littl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Cancer Health Society Cancer research Medical research Science Children Pharmaceuticals industry Business European Union World news Source Type: news

Second Annual Early Career Investigator Lecture for Undergraduate Students on Feedback Loop
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 14, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

On Pi Day, Computational Biologists Share What They Love About Math
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 14, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Parenthood can help you live longer in older age, research suggests
Life expectancy of men and women aged between 60 and 100 and having children better than those with no children, study findsParenthood could boost your chances of living longer in your later years, according researchers who believe the effect could be down to children helping with care and support.While previous research has shown that adults with children live longer than those without, the new study unpicks how the effect plays out in older age.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Ageing Medical research Science UK news World news Sweden Parents and parenting Life and style Family Health Society Source Type: news

Bowel cancer medication could help combat early-onset Parkinson's disease
(University of Leicester) A Medical Research Council-funded University of Leicester study shows folinic acid can protect neurons in fruit flies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brain scans can spot criminals, scientists say
Experiments prove judicial distinction between criminal intent and reckless behaviour has scientific merit tooNeuroscientists have used brain scans to spot the difference between people who committed crimes on purpose and those who broke the law through sheer reckless behaviour.It is the first time that people ’s intentions, or otherwise, to perform criminal acts have been decoded in a brain scanner, revealing that legal categories used to draw up sentences reflect real brain activity.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Medical research UK news World news US news Law Crime US crime Source Type: news

Screentime linked to greater diabetes risk among children
Spending over three hours watching TV or playing computer games every day increases risk of the disease in childhood, study saysChildren who are allowed more than three hours of screentime a day are at greater risk of developing diabetes, new research suggests.The study found that children who were glued to their screens for three or more hours a day scored higher on measures of body fat and had higher levels of resistance to the hormone insulin than their peers who spent an hour or less watching TV, videos or playing computer games.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Science UK news Children Health Diabetes Society Source Type: news

NIGMS in the News
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 13, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

2017 MIDAS Annual Network Meeting, May 22-24, 2017
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - March 13, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news