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U of L considers spinning off its hospital, other medical operations
The University of Louisville might reorganize its many medical enterprises into a new business entity that would operate separately from the university. Interim university president Greg Postel said at a board of trustees meeting Wednesday that reorganizing the university's clinical, medical research and medical education endeavors into a separate business entity wouldn't change the university's mission or function. "No real estate would change h ands, the faculty are still faculty members at the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 27, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Chris Larson Source Type: news

Tanzania: Tanzania Scientists Explain Why Mosquito Net Treatment Safe
[Citizen] Dar es Salaam -Senior scientists at the National Institute for Medical Research (Nimr) in Tanzania yesterday allayed public fears following reports of a study by a Kenyan researcher who claimed that the common Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs)--also used here--are unsafe. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 27, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cheap, widely available drug could stop thousands of mothers bleeding to death
Tranexamic acid could save the lives of a third of women who die in childbirth from excessive bleeding, which kills 100,000 a yearA cheap and widely available drug could save the lives of thousands of women who die in childbirth from excessive bleeding, one of the main killers of women worldwide.The drug, tranexamic acid, is available over the counter in the UK to women suffering from heavy periods. In Japan and the far east, it is used as a skin whitener. But now a very large study of 20,000 women in 21 countries has shown it can stop a third of cases of bleeding to death after giving birth.Continue reading... (Source: Gu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Medical research Childbirth Health & wellbeing Women Science Life and style Society Source Type: news

iMedicalApps.com: New Medical-Grade Smartwatch Announced
(MedPage Today) -- Verily launches Study Watch for use in medical research (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - April 26, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Every Diet On The Market Is Basically Trying To Sell You These Three Pieces Of Information About Food
When it comes down to it, most of the diet plans and weight loss programs out there are all selling you the same thing: what to eat, when to eat, and how much to eat. They might use lots of medical research, compelling before / after photos, or powerful marketing language to make it appear as though their solution is different from anything else you’ve ever encountered before. But really, the diet industry is just making suckers out of us all, and we’re falling for it hook, line, and sinker--to the tune of $60 Billion a year! Why do we keep buying into these poorly shrink-wrapped versions of the same three pieces of in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early Career Scientist Shares Her Passion for Basic Research, Mentoring and More on Feedback Loop
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - April 26, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

DNA-based test can spot cancer recurrence a year before conventional scans
‘Liquid biopsy’ diagnosed cancer recurrence up to a year before CT scans are able to in major lung cancer trial, and could buy crucial time for doctorsA revolutionary blood test has been shown to diagnose the recurrence of cancer up to a year in advance of conventional scans in a major lung cancer trial.The test, known as a liquid biopsy, could buy crucial time for doctors by indicating that cancer is growing in the body when tumours are not yet detectable on CT scans and long before the patient becomes aware of physical symptoms.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Cancer Cancer research Health Lung cancer Medical research Science Society Source Type: news

Africa: Why Medicinal Plants Could Play a Role in Treating Malaria
[The Conversation Africa] It will take effective prevention, accurate and timely diagnosis and treatment to successfully eliminate malaria. But none of this will help if the causative agents become resistant to the drugs used for treatment. The Conversation Africa's Health and Medicine Editor Joy Wanja Muraya spoke to Dr. Jeremiah Waweru Gathirwa and Ruth Monyenye Nyang'acha researchers at the Kenya Medical Research Institute about the country's work towards using medicinal plants as a potential anti-malarial drugs. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - April 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HHMI awards medical research fellowships to 79 students
(Howard Hughes Medical Institute) The Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) Medical Research Fellows Program has selected 79 talented medical and veterinary students to conduct in-depth, mentored biomedical research. Each fellow will spend a year pursuing basic, translational, or applied biomedical research at one of 32 academic or nonprofit research institutions across the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Watch George Church ’s Moving Toast at the 2017 TIME 100 Gala
Notable Harvard geneticist, biological engineer and author George Church paid tribute to people who volunteer for medical research during a toast at the TIME 100 Gala Tuesday. “There are all kinds of issues they have with time, pain and risk. I know firsthand how hard this can be,” he said before joking about how his students use him for research. “Apparently it’s quite ethical to do.” Considered one the world’s leading experts in synthetic biology, Church has regularly made headlines for his ideas on evolution and appearances with Stephen Colbert (who penned a piece on Church for TIME 1...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - April 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime TIME 100 Source Type: news

Q & A: saturated fat, your health and what the experts say
The key points in a debate between cardiology experts over the link between fat, cholesterol and coronary diseaseWhat ’s the fuss about?A furore has blown up over whether eating saturated fat increases the risk of coronary heart disease after three cardiologists said that “the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong”. They also dismissed the drive for foods with lower cholesterol and the use of medications as “misguided”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Nutrition Medical research Health & wellbeing Obesity Diets and dieting Heart attack Diabetes Stroke Smoking Doctors Science Source Type: news

Artificial womb for premature babies successful in animal trials
Lambs born at equivalent of 23 weeks human gestation kept alive and developing in advance could transform outlook for very premature babiesAn artificial womb designed to support critically premature babies has been demonstrated successfully in animals for the first time, in an advance that could transform the lives of the most fragile newborns.Lambs born at the equivalent of 23 weeks in a human pregnancy were kept alive and appeared to develop normally while floating inside the transparent, womb-like vessel for four weeks after birth. Doctors said that the pioneering approach could radically improve outcomes for babies bor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Biology Premature birth Reproduction Science Medical research Source Type: news

The development and validation of an instrument to measure the quality of health research reports in the lay media - Zeraatkar D, Obeda M, Ginsberg JS, Hirsh J.
BACKGROUND: The media serves as an important link between medical research, as reported in scholarly sources, and the public and has the potential to act as a powerful tool to improve public health. However, concerns about the reliability of health researc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Media, Marketing, and Internet Issues Source Type: news

Novel phage therapy saves patient with multidrug-resistant bacterial infection
(University of California - San Diego) Scientists and physicians at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, working with colleagues at the US Navy Medical Research Center -- Biological Defense Research Directorate (NMRC-BDRD), Texas A&M University, a San Diego-based biotech and elsewhere, have successfully used an experimental therapy involving bacteriophages -- viruses that target and consume specific strains of bacteria -- to treat a patient near death from a multidrug-resistant bacterium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Blood Test May Better Predict Gestational Diabetes
A single measurement of plasma glycated CD59, a novel biomarker for diabetes, at weeks 24-28 of pregnancy identifies women at risk of gestational diabetes (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - April 24, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

IACUC 101/201 Workshops: June 7-8, Missoula, MT
IACUC 101/201 Workshops will be held June 7-8, 2017, in Missoula, MT. IACUC 101: The Basics is a one-day didactic and interactive exploration of IACUC fundamentals appropriate for new and seasoned IACUC members, IACUC affiliates, and individuals responsible for their institution ' s animal care program. The course provides a basic yet comprehensive overview of the laws, regulations, and policies that govern the humane care and use of research animals. IACUC 201: Beyond Basics is a highly interactive advanced program that builds upon the fundamentals learned in IACUC 101, applying them to the process and mech...
Source: OLAW News - April 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Tanzania: Ex-Institute for Medical Research Boss Speaks for First Time Since Her New Job At WHO
[Citizen] Geneva -Former Director General of the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR), Dr Mwele Malecela, speaks exclusively to The Citizen's Health Reporter Syriacus Buguzi on the sidelines of last week's global summit on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) thet took place here. Now working as director in the Office of Africa Regional Director at the World Health Organisation, Dr Malecela speaks to a Tanzanian newspaper for the first time since her appointment to her new position, which she landed five months afte (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 24, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

​How ​my potentially fatal allergy was cured – with 70 wasp stings
Four years ago, Gavan Naden nearly died from anaphylactic shock after being stung by wasps. He became fearful of going outside, but a drastic immunotherapy regime has saved himOver the past three and half years, I ’ve had 70 wasp stings injected into my left arm. Voluntarily. This hasn ’t been an exercise in masochism, but rather to ensure I can go outside without screaming from fear.Every year in the UK, there are between two and nine deaths from anaphylaxis caused by bee and wasp venom. In 2015-16, there were4,451 hospital admissions for anaphylactic shock. In an effort to avoid adding to these statist...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gavan Naden Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Immunology Medical research Biochemistry and molecular biology Source Type: news

Study Shows LGB and Straight Patients Are More Willing To Disclose Sexual Orientation Information Than Providers Expect
New research shows 78 percent of providers expect that patients would refuse to provide sexual orientation information if asked in the emergency setting, but only 10 percent of patients report that they would refuse (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - April 24, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Obesity blamed for sharp rise in kidney cancer in UK
Cancer Research UK says disease has risen 40% in last decade, and threatens to become one of the fastest growing cancersObesity is to blame for a surge in kidney cancer in the UK, causing an extra 20,000 cases in the last 10 years, according to a leading charity.Cancer Research UK says that new cases of kidney cancer have risen steeply, by 40% over the past decade.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Cancer Cancer research Obesity Health Medical research Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells May Be Responsible For The Future Of Medicine
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); When Henrietta Lacks, a 31-year-old black woman from Virginia, sought treatment for stomach pain at Baltimore’s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical r...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical r...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Almost untreatable superbug CPE poses serious threat to patients, doctors warn
Immune to some of the last-line antibiotics available to hospitals, cases of carbapenemase-producingEnterobacteriaceae are on the rise, NHS data reveals•Read the Bureau of Investigative Journalism ’s report on the rise of CPEDoctors are warning that the rise of an almost untreatable superbug, immune to some of the last-line antibiotics available to hospitals, poses a serious threat to patients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Madlen Davies and Sarah Boseley Tags: MRSA and superbugs Drug resistance Health Science Medical research NHS UK news Antibiotics Source Type: news

Reported link between diet drinks and dementia and stroke is weak
Conclusion The researchers used data from a large ongoing cohort study to look for links between consumption of sugary and artificially sweetened drinks and risk of stroke or dementia. This cohort study benefits from the large overall sample size, long period of data collection, careful and valid diagnostic assessments, and adjustments for a number of confounders. However, care must be taken when interpreting these results – particularly if latching on to the maximal tripled risk figures reported in the media. There are several points to consider: Small numbers The new number of strokes and dementia in this study was sma...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news

Cycling commuters have lower rates of heart disease and cancer
Conclusion This prospective cohort study has established that active methods of commuting to work, either walking or cycling, are associated with reduced risk of death, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Overall this was a well-designed study based on a large collection of real-world data from the UK. The researchers controlled for key socioeconomic and lifestyle confounders. Although this is an observational study, confidence in the link is improved by its consistency with existing knowledge and research on the benefits of physical activity and the graded response in the results. Participants from the UK Biobank who were...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Cancer Heart/lungs Source Type: news

New Technology May Help Reduce Serious and Costly Post-Surgical Infections —Using Nothing but Air on Biomedical Beat
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - April 21, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Kenya: Local Scientists Warn of Health Risk On Animal Antibiotics Use
[Nation] The Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) has warned that increased use of antibiotics to boost growth of animals is endangering the health of meat consumers. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 21, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Italian court rules mobile phone use caused brain tumour
Court awards pension to employee who claimed work-related use of a mobile led to him developing a benign tumourAn Italian court has ruled that excessive, work-related use of a mobile phone caused an executive to develop a benign brain tumour.In what could become a landmark ruling, the court in the northern town of Ivrea awarded the plaintiff a state-funded pension.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Mobile phones Health Society Cancer research Technology Science Telecoms Medical research Source Type: news

4 top regulatory issues to watch in 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]This is shaping up to be a big year when it comes to medtech regulation, as well as regulations for other types of life science companies. Rachel Beavins Tracy, EtQ This year is proving to have some big changes in store for life sciences companies. The new Trump administration brings changes in key areas such as the Affordable Care Act and Medical Device User Fee Agreements (MDUFA). So, which regulatory issues should life sciences companies watch for this year? We’ve put together a shortlist of key regulatory issues in 2017. 1. FDA Finalizes Premarket Submission Guidelines for Medical Device Cybe...
Source: Mass Device - April 20, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance ETQ regulation Source Type: news

Oprah Wants The World To Know Henrietta Lacks Is A Hidden Figure No More
Oprah Winfrey is a one-of-a-kind woman. Her life story is inspiring, her presence powerful and her influence unmatched. And when it comes to successful black women in media, Oprah reigns supreme. But if Oprah is a well-crafted diamond, consider Baltimore the pressure that helped make her shine. She moved to the city in 1976 to pursue her career as a newscaster, which presented both great opportunities for success as well as challenges she eventually overcame. She spent nearly eight years in the city, first working for a local TV station ― where she was assigned to learn about every neighborhood ― and later as a p...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Oprah Wants The World To Know Henrietta Lacks Is A Hidden Figure No More
Oprah Winfrey is a one-of-a-kind woman. Her life story is inspiring, her presence powerful and her influence unmatched. And when it comes to successful black women in media, Oprah reigns supreme. But if Oprah is a well-crafted diamond, consider Baltimore the pressure that helped make her shine. She moved to the city in 1976 to pursue her career as a newscaster, which presented both great opportunities for success as well as challenges she eventually overcame. She spent nearly eight years in the city, first working for a local TV station ― where she was assigned to learn about every neighborhood ― and later as a p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Historical Analysis of NIGMS Early Stage Investigators ’ Awards and Funding on Feedback Loop
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - April 20, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

​HarkerBio latest Buffalo startup to raise more than $1 million
HarkerBio has raised $1.3 million in angel financing to support its growing operations. The company spun off from Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute in 2014 as a specialized contract research organization, and hit the market about a year ago with clients that range from large pharmaceutical companies to smaller entities. The company earned about $850,000 in revenue last ye ar as its team expanded from three employees to 13, many of them PhDs and out-of-state recruits, said James Biltekoff,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 20, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Dan Miner Source Type: news

Trump's War On Federal Science Will Stifle Innovation And Hurt The Economy
Just after President Trump was elected last November, thousands of American scientists did something unprecedented. Startled by the incoming president’s blatant disregard for the facts, they sent an open letter calling on the new administration and Congress to respect “scientific integrity and independence.” Signed by more than 5,500 scientists, the letter ends with a warning: “We will continue to champion efforts that strengthen the role of science in policymaking, and stand ready to hold accountable any who might seek to undermine it.” If Trump’s scientifically indefensible statements on the campaign trail we...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

WFU medical school dean: NIH cuts would be 'devastating' for research
From a human biologics startup seeking its first grant to established programs studying aging and cancer, organizations in the Triad are already feeling the effects of proposed cuts to federal funding for medical research. The $5.8 billion funding cut to the National Institutes of Health put forth in President Donald Trump’s U.S. budget proposal has the potential to curb innovation in the Triad, which would have broader implications for the economy, according to members of the area’s health… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Two older drugs could be 'repurposed' to fight dementia
Conclusion This early stage experimental research has demonstrated a beneficial neurological effect of trazodone and dibenzoylmethane on mice with diseases mimicking neurodegenerative diseases. It is important to acknowledge that this is animal research and therefore the drugs might not have the same effect when they are trialled on humans. That being said, trazodone is already an approved drug for depression and sleep problems and has therefore already passed safety tests. If the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in humans and mice are similar, it is possible trazodone could be used in the future in treating Alzheimer's and...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Neurology Medication Source Type: news

Why scientists should start taking orgasm seriously
Orgasms are big business, but there ’s surprising little scientific research being done into how they actually work. There are urgent reasons to fix thisAs a DPhil student on a four-year funded programme, I had the rare luxury of a year to decide on the major focus of my research. After reading around, I got interested in the science of orgasm and anorgasmia (difficulty or inability to orgasm). It seemed like an ideal research topic – it has social value, it’s a young field with lots of progress ready to be made, and it wouldn’t leave people at parties yawning when they asked what I did. Unfortunately, it didn ’t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jimi Cullen Tags: Sex Biology Science Neuroscience Reproduction Medical research Depression Life and style Society Source Type: news

A Promising Target for Kidney Fibrosis
Increasing SMOC2 in the kidney helped initiate and continue the progression of kidney fibrosis, while tamping down SMOC2 prevented it (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - April 20, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

ICARE Academies in Philadelphia & Richmond: Registration Open!
ICARE Academy | July 25-26, 2017 | Philadelphia, PARegister Now! ICARE Academy | August 28-29, 2017 | Richmond, VARegister Now! What to Expect (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - April 19, 2017 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Who Was Henrietta Lacks? 5 Striking Facts About The ‘Mother Of Modern Medicine’
Hardly anyone knew of Henrietta Lacks’ life story prior to 2010.   That year, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks was released, and went on to become a New York Times best-seller. The biographical book told the story of a black woman born on a tobacco farm in Roanoke, Virginia, in 1920 who revolutionized medical research and saved the lives of millions, without ever knowing it. Now, a new film by the same name starring Oprah Winfrey aims to make her life and impact more widely known. Who exactly was Henrietta Lacks? And why is she described as the “Mother of Medicine&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Who Was Henrietta Lacks? 5 Striking Facts About The ‘Mother Of Modern Medicine’
Hardly anyone knew of Henrietta Lacks’ life story prior to 2010.   That year, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks was released, and went on to become a New York Times best-seller. The biographical book told the story of a black woman born on a tobacco farm in Roanoke, Virginia, in 1920 who revolutionized medical research and saved the lives of millions, without ever knowing it. Now, a new film by the same name starring Oprah Winfrey aims to make her life and impact more widely known. Who exactly was Henrietta Lacks? And why is she described as the “Mother of Medicine&...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Umbilical cord blood could slow brain's ageing, study suggests
Scientists hope protein infusion which rejuvenated brains of aged mice could combat mental decline in older peopleScientists have reversed memory and learning problems in aged mice with infusions of a protein found in human umbilical cord blood.The striking results have raised hopes for a treatment that staves off mental decline in old age, but researchers stressed that more studies, including human trials, are needed before the therapy can be considered for clinical use.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Ageing Memory Alzheimer's Health Society Source Type: news

Few Medicare Patients Take Advantage of Free Annual Wellness Visits
Differences in visit use across the country observed (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - April 19, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

USDA AWIC Workshop: May 10-11, Beltsville, MD
Meeting the Information Requirements of the Animal Welfare Act: A Workshop  The USDA Animal Welfare Information Center (AWIC) teaches a one and a half day workshop at the National Agricultural Library (NAL) in Beltsville, MD, for individuals who are responsible for providing information to meet the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). The workshop is targeted for principal investigators, members of IACUCs, information providers, administrators of animal use programs, and veterinarians.  (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - April 17, 2017 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

What is ECT and how does it work?
One Flew Over the Cuckoo ’s Nest has coloured perceptions of electroconvulsive therapy, but the modern reality is differentThe public perception of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is rooted in cultural depictions, not least the dramatic scene in the film One Flew Over the Cuckoo ’s Nest in which Jack Nicholson is held down as the treatment is carried out.Sylvia Plath ’s account in The Bell Jar is hardly less brutal. Describing ECT, administered without general anesthetic, the protagonist says: “With each flash a great jolt drubbed me till I thought my bones would break and the sap fly out of me like a split plant....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Mental health Society Depression Medical research Science Source Type: news

Advisory Council Minutes, January 26-27, 2017
(Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - April 17, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Our Economy Depends On Earth Observation And Scientific Research
Since the mid-1970s I have studied and worked as a practitioner in the areas of environmental policy and public management. In helping to build the academic field and profession of sustainability management, I have had the opportunity to combine these areas of study. One of the founders of the field of management was a brilliant and practical man named Peter Drucker. A famous “Druckerism” is: “if you can’t measure something you can’t manage it.” Without measurement, you can’t tell if your management decision-making had made the situation better or worse. In order to measure something, you must observe it. Ear...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Britain doubles funding to fight tropical diseases
Programme will help protect 200 million in world ’s poorest countriesThe UK has pledged to double the funding it gives to fighting neglected tropical diseases, in a move that will protect more than 200 million people around the world from debilitating and painful conditions. The funding programme is expected to wipe out the parasitic disease visceral leishmaniasis in Asia, eliminateGuinea worm and save hundreds of thousands of people from blindness and other disabilities.Speaking ahead of the World Health Organisation conference onneglected tropical diseases in Geneva on Wednesday, Priti Patel, the international developm...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca Ratcliffe Tags: Global development Medical research Health Science UK news Society Source Type: news

The Guardian view on immortality: not for the faint-hearted | Editorial
The faithful and the futurologists imagine life without death. But living forever may not be all it ’s cracked up to be, and then what?Good Friday seems a suitable day to consider the fact that, in an era in whichlife expectancy everywhere has almost doubled, humankind is more confused than ever about death.Nearly half of the British population supposes that death is complete annihilation; an almost equal number still believes in some form of life after death, and, for a subject notably lacking in eyewitness data, a surprisingly small proportion, less than 10%, acknowledge they do not know what happens. Meanwhile, i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Death and dying Religion World news Life and style Christianity Islam Buddhism Cryonics Medical research Science Science fiction Books Easter Source Type: news