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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 3.

Against North Carolina ’s HB2 Law: Mental Health And Discrimination Cannot Co-Exist
This past May, the board of directors of Grantmakers in Health (GIH) decided to relocate the organization’s 2017 Annual Conference on Health Philanthropy from Charlotte, North Carolina, to another city. This difficult decision was made in light of the state of North Carolina’s controversial new law, the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act (HB2). The law overturned a Charlotte ordinance that extended rights to gay and transgender people. In doing so, the state effectively sanctioned discrimination against a class of its citizens. I am a member of the GIH board. Not only am I proud of GIH’s decision, but as exec...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 4, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Octavio N. Martinez, Jr. Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured GrantWatch Children Health Philanthropy LGBT issues Mental Health Politics States transgender discrimination Source Type: blogs

How You Might Be Unwittingly Relinquishing Your Power —and How to Get It Back
She’s driving me crazy! He doesn’t want to improve our relationship, so there’s nothing I can do. I have to work late. Yet again. I’m not smart. I’m not capable of accomplishing this. I don’t have time for what I really want to do. If only things were different. Why does this keep happening to me??? These are just some of the ways we relinquish our power—to others, to circumstances, to conditions. As psychotherapist Eli Feldman, LMHC, said, “there are a million ways we take power away from ourselves.” We think that people do things to us. We assume that we have zero control, whether it’s at work or with...
Source: World of Psychology - August 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Auschwitz concentration camp be proactive being reactive Choice Control Decision Making empowering yourself freedom to choose pe Source Type: blogs

Depression and Men: Why It ’ s Hard to Ask for Help
Fans surprised Supernatural star Jared Padalecki at Comic-Con on Sunday, July 12, by lighting candles in the audience — over 7,000 of them — as a thank you for opening up about his struggles with depression and as a tribute to his Always Keep Fighting campaign that supports people struggling with depression, self-injury, addiction, or suicidal thoughts. You can see Padalecki’s Tweet here: View from stage. #ComicCon pic.twitter.com/aIy04Cf6ak — Jared Padalecki (@jarpad) July 12, 2015 During filming of the third season of Supernatural, Padalecki broke down in his trailer after shooting an episode. A...
Source: World of Psychology - August 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Men's Issues Jared Padalecki Major Depressive Disorder Mental Health Support Mood Disorder Seasonal Affective Disorder Stigma Suicide Source Type: blogs

A lot of “Voice Hearing” isn’t an auditory experience at all
The message from recent surveys is that it’s not just people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who hear voices in their heads, many people considered mentally well do to. This revelation may have a welcome de-stigmatising effect in terms of how people think about some of the symptoms associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, but a new study published in Psychosis asks us to hang on a minute – to say that one “hears voices” can mean different things to different people. You might assume that “hears voices” means that a person has an hallucinated auditory experience just like someone i...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: researchdigestblog Tags: Mental health Psychosis Source Type: blogs

A lot of "voice hearing" isn't an auditory experience at all
The message from recent surveys is that it's not just people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who hear voices in their heads,many people considered mentally well do to. This revelation may have a welcome de-stigmatising effect in terms of how people think about some of the symptoms associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, buta new study published inPsychosis asks us to hang on a minute – to say that one "hears voices" can mean different things to different people. You might assume that "hears voices" means that a person has an hallucinated auditory experience just like someone is talking to them. But what about hea...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Research Digest Source Type: blogs

Depression in Seniors: What You Need to Know
Depression often goes overlooked, under-diagnosed and untreated in adults 65 years old and older. Symptoms tend to get dismissed as a standard part of aging. But they’re anything but. Depression is a serious illness that disrupts lives and increases the risk for suicide. Thankfully, however, it is treatable. Very treatable. In her excellent, eye-opening book Depression in Later Life: An Essential Guide psychologist Deborah Serani, Psy.D, sheds light on this prevalent disorder. She shares a slew of vital facts, research and case studies about what depression looks like in seniors and what helps to treat it. Below are five...
Source: World of Psychology - August 3, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Depression Disorders Family Friends General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress anxiety Chronic Illness Deborah Serani Elderly Helplessness Hopelessness late-life suicide later life depression Source Type: blogs

Brain scan study finds links between adolescent brain development and mental health disorders
— “Brain hubs”, courtesy of University of Cambridge Scans reveal how teenage brain develops (BBC News): “The team from Cambridge’s department of psychiatry scanned the brains of 300 people between the ages of 14 and 24. While the areas associated with the basic functioning of the body such as vision, hearing and movement are fully developed by adolescence, the areas associated with complex thought and decision making are still changing… You can think of the brain as a global airline network that’s made up of small infrequently used airports and huge hubs like Heathrow where there is very high traffic…The r...
Source: SharpBrains - August 3, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness adolescence brain brain-function mental-illness psychiatry teenage teenage-brain Source Type: blogs

Extinguishing Medical Errors with Oil and Gas
Unfortunately for patients and healthcare workers alike, medical errors happen. No matter how well-trained and experienced the practitioner, underneath the scrubs there still resides a human and errors will follow. However, systems can be put in place to minimise them and medicine could do well to learn lessons from other industries. In 2012, there were 107 serious medical errors in Australian hospitals. These ranged from surgery performed on the wrong patient or body part, to surgery where instruments were left inside the patient, to medication errors and in-hospital suicides 1. When considered in the context of the 53 mi...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 3, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tane Eunson Tags: Administration Medical Errors atul gawande O&G oil and gas industry Source Type: blogs

The psychiatrist with a psychiatrist
I sat across from her and in my most official yet trusting psychiatrist’s tone gave the spiel I delivered many times. “Amanda, I’d like to start you on a medication that might help your depression. Like every medication it can cause side effects, however, many people have no side effects or only have minor ones. This drug can cause weight gain, increased risk of diabetes, and increased risk of heart disease.” A year ago I — a psychiatry resident — was on the receiving end of a similar speech. I had just started taking an antipsychotic, the same medication I prescribed to my sickest patients. Patients li...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 2, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kali-cyrus" rel="tag" > Kali Cyrus, MD, MPH < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Jul 31, Thomas Kirkbride: Today in the History of Psychology (31st July 1809)
Thomas Story Kirkbride was born. A leading advocate for the compassionate and humane treatment of the mentally-ill, Kirkbride's most influential treatise on the subject 'On The Construction, Organization and General Arrangements Of Hospitals For The Insane,' was first published in 1854. A true visionary and founding member of the Association of Medical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane (the forerunner to the American Psychiatric Association), Kirkbride dedicated his life to improving the conditions under which the mentally ill were institutionalized. (Source: Forensic Psychology Blog)
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - August 1, 2016 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: July 30, 2016
This study gives us a clue why this is the case: It’s during these teenage years that those brain regions that have the strongest link to the schizophrenia risk genes are developing most rapidly.” Happiness And Inner Peace During Turbulent Times: Unless you’ve been — no, you know what? — even if you have been living under a rock, you’re well aware of the extremely turbulent times our world has been experiencing recently. Marilyn Tam, a board-certified coach in executive, corporate, and leadership issues and the author of The Happiness Choice, has compiled a list of five tips you can try ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Children and Teens Depression Disorders Happiness Industrial and Workplace Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Schizophrenia Sexuality Stress Academy of Management balance Brain Scans Ed Bullmore emotio Source Type: blogs

Can a Smell Test Predict Early Stages of Alzheimer ’s Disease?
Researchers report that an odor identification test may prove useful in predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer ’s disease. By Alzheimer's Reading Room I wrote about the smell test many times here in the Alzheimer's Reading Room. It interests me not only because it would be a good way to detect Alzheimer's; but also I think it relates to why it is often difficult to get dementia patients to eat more food. Thing about it? What usually happens when you smell food cooking? If it smells good - you get hungry. Those saliva glands get in action. How to encourage a dementia patients to eat ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - July 29, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's and dementia alzheimers care dementia care family caregiving help alzheimer's memory care odor identification smell test Source Type: blogs

10 Ways to Prevent Mania and Hypomania
Bipolar disorder is one of the most difficult illnesses to treat because by addressing the depression part of the illness, you can inadvertently trigger mania or hypomania. Even in Bipolar II, where the hypomania is less destabilizing than the often-psychotic manic episodes of Bipolar I, persons often experience from a debilitating depression that can’t be lifted by mood stabilizers and antipsychotics. Antidepressants, though, can cause a person with bipolar to cycle between hypomania and depression. I have worked with psychiatrists who were too afraid of cycling to risk using antidepressants for bipolar patients. They p...
Source: World of Psychology - July 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Bipolar Mania Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Sleep Antidepressant Antipsychotic Bipolar Disorder Depression Hypomania Mood Disorder Mood Stabilizers Rapid Cycling Sleep Deprivation Sleep Hygiene Source Type: blogs

10 of The Most Widely Believed Myths in Psychology
In a sense we’re all amateur psychologists – we’ve got our own first-hand experience at being human, and we’ve spent years observing how we and others behave in different situations. This intuition fuels a “folk psychology” that sometimes overlaps with findings from scientific psychology, but often does not. Some erroneous psychological intuitions are particularly widely believed among the public and are stubbornly persistent. This post is about 10 of these myths or misconceptions. It’s important to challenge these myths, not just to set the record straight, but also because their exis...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: researchdigestblog Tags: Feature featured Source Type: blogs

10 of The Most Widely Believed Myths in Psychology
In a sense we're all amateur psychologists – we've got our own first-hand experience at being human, and we've spent years observing how we and others behave in different situations. This intuition fuels a "folk psychology" that sometimes overlaps with findings from scientific psychology, but often does not. Some erroneous psychological in tuitions are particularly widely believed among the public and are stubbornly persistent. This post is about 10 of these myths or misconceptions. It's important to challenge these myths, not just to set the record straight, but also because their existence can contribute to stigma and ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 29, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Research Digest Source Type: blogs

Better people make better doctors
What does society expect of today’s doctor? More importantly, what does today’s doctor expect of themselves? How can we become better doctors? An overview with Tane Eunson The expectations modern society places on doctors are explored in the ‘good samaritan’ case of Dekker vs Medical Board of WA, where a doctor was called to account for ‘improper conduct in a professional respect’ when she didn’t stop to lend urgent medical assistance at a motor vehicle accident. This post examines how today’s doctors are judged with respect to ‘professionalism’ and how those notions have changed over time. It is th...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 28, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Arcanum Veritas better doctors Better people Tane Eunson Source Type: blogs

Murphy Bill --Now With Guns?
Pretend there's a photo of the U.S. Capitol here.   Blogger is not cooperating. Let me first send you to Pete Earley's blog to read about the Murphy Bill, HR2646, which was passed by the House of Representatives with a vote of 422-2.   The Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act had bipartisian and broad support, but not until it was sanitized of it's controversial issues: patient advocacy groups remained funded, outpatient commitment was de-emphasized, and the right of a   patient with a psychiatric disorder to refuse release of their health information to family/caregivers remained intact (at leas...
Source: Shrink Rap - July 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Boy or Girl and Are You Sick?
First, let me send you to an article in the New York Times : W.H.O. Weighs Dropping Transgender Identity from List of Mental Disorders. There are lines we've drawn in medicine: a fever above a certain degree is not normal and indicates a pathological process.   A tumor that will spread and debilitate you is not normal and indicates a pathological process.   To be pervasively sad, uninterested in the things you enjoy, and want to kill yourself is not normal and indicates a pathological process.   And to hear voices and believe that someone is monitoring you when no voice or stalker or agency is there, is...
Source: Shrink Rap - July 27, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Learning Empathy through Chekhov
Guy Glass, MD, MFA, Clinical Assistant Professor Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care and Bioethics Stony Brook School of Medicine I am a psychiatrist who writes plays and has several professional productions and published plays to my credit. Having recently earned an MFA in theater from Stony Brook University, I […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 26, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Lucy Bruell Tags: Health Care Literature Arts and Medicine Blog New Conceptual Frameworks syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Psychiatry is a field in upheaval about diagnosis
Ms. C was one of my first patients with schizophrenia. I saw her on the inpatient unit of a psychiatric hospital where I was training as a psychiatry resident. Ms. C suffered terribly from what we call the negative symptoms of schizophrenia; she sat mute for much of the day in her bed, staring out of the window. She would occasionally respond to a question with a one-word response, but there was a sense in which she was absent, hollowed out. She troubled the staff because she would sometimes not even leave her bed to urinate. During the same month, I met Mr. L, a vigorous young man who had until recently been a student at ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 26, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/robbie-fenster" rel="tag" > Robbie Fenster, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Killer wives are "wicked", killer husbands are "stressed" – uncovering the sexism in judges' closing remarks
This study should open a conversation, and further research into how judges treat domestic killers in the dock. _________________________________ Hall, G., Whittle, M., & amp; Field, C. (2016). Themes in Judges' Sentencing Remarks for Male and Female Domestic Murderers Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 23 (3), 395-412 DOI: 10.1080/13218719.2015.1080142 -- further reading -- Judges are more lenient toward a psychopath when given a neuro explanation for his condition The psychology of female serial killers How our judgments about criminals are swayed by disgust, biological explanations and animalistic description...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Research Digest Source Type: blogs

Patients With Severe Schizophrenia Aren ’t Getting The Help They Need
Even when effectively treated, schizophrenia can be devastating, impairing a person’s social and family life, ability to work, physical health, and quality of life. Those who have schizophrenia often end up alone and impoverished. Yet the effects of this disease are even worse when treatment doesn’t work. Treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) is formally defined as schizophrenia that is not well controlled despite adequate trials of at least two medications — a definition that applies to between 20 to 30 percent of patients with the condition. An effective treatment exists for TRS: the anti-psychotic clozapine,...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - July 25, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Adam Rose Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Featured Public Health Quality Clozapine Mental Health schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

No, autistic people do not have a "broken" mirror neuron system – new evidence
By guest blogger Helge  Hasselmann Scientists are still struggling to understand the causes of autism. A difficulty bonding with others represents one of the core symptoms and has been the focus of several theories that try and explain exactly why these deficits come about. One of the more prominent examples, the “ broken mirror hypothesis ”, suggests that an impaired development of the mirror neuron system (MNS) is to blame. First observed in monkeys, mirror neurons are more active when you perform a certain action and when you see someone else engage in the same behavior – for example, when you smile or whe...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Research Digest Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: July 23, 2016
AAAAAACHOOOOOO! That’s me, readers, sneezing my brains out as I type this. You might remember I mentioned being sick last week? Well, this week, allergies decided to fill the void my common cold left behind. It’s been a rough couple of weeks for me and, as a matter of fact, I’m going to stop here and leave you to peruse this week’s latest news about psychiatry and eugenics, using mindfulness to launch your career, some interesting results related to the self-esteem of women around the world, and more, because I’m headed to my pharmacist. (They’re used to people looking like something th...
Source: World of Psychology - July 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: ADHD and ADD Disorders Marriage and Divorce Mindfulness Personality Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Treatment Women's Issues Association for Research in Personality attention deficit hyper a Source Type: blogs

Primary care physicians should advocate for fewer restrictions on women ’s choices
Our patient was a 15-year-old girl who came to the emergency room of our hospital saying she wanted to commit suicide after being raped several weeks ago at a classmate’s party. In the emergency room, a urine pregnancy test was positive. On admission to the hospital, she was very clear that her thoughts of killing herself came from her rape and current pregnancy. She was clear that she wished to end the pregnancy. Her mother, who was by her side throughout the hospitalization, supported her daughter’s right to seek an abortion. Our supervising doctor (who is also an abortion provider at an outside clinic) infor...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 22, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/joshua-st-louis-and-dana-marcinkowski-desmond" rel="tag" > Joshua St. Louis, MD, MPH and Dana Marcinkowski-Desmond, MD, MPH < /a > Tags: Physician OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

10 complimentary passes for 2016 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (December 6-8th) — Names Announced
—————- Dear SharpBrains readers, Thank you everyone who completed the survey we sent out a few weeks ago; it’s a pleasure to go through so many excellent insights! We promised to distribute 5 complimentary passes to our upcoming virtual conference among respondents whose feedback we found particularly illuminating and valuable– here are the lucky winners who will be able to learn and contribute at the 2016 SharpBrains Virtual Summit on a comp basis: Dr. Carlos Davidovich, Optimum Talent Deborah Zamin, Toronto District School Board Joan Wilson, Madigan Army Medical Center Milton Cadena, Ca...
Source: SharpBrains - July 22, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology brain conference Reinventing Source Type: blogs

The Brain ’ s Critical Balance
The BRAIN Initiative is supporting scientists aiming to understand how the 86 billion neurons in the brain act together to enable consciousness and behavior. Dr. Insel gives a snapshot of recent work and its implications for understanding normal and disordered brain function. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - July 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

What Caused This to Happen? – Part 2
A London neuroscientist suggests two kinds of causes for disease; Dr. Insel talks about the implications of this view for understanding mental disorders. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - July 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Tau Protein Spreads Through the Brain Via Extracellular Space
A toxic Alzheimer’s protein can spread through the brain—jumping from one neuron to another—via the extracellular space that surrounds the brain’s neurons.Alzheimer's Reading RoomThe spread of the protein, called tau, may explain why only one area of the brain is affected in the early stages of Alzheimer’s but multiple areas are affected in later stages of the disease.“By learning how tau spreads, we may be able to stop it from jumping from neuron to neuron,” says Dr. Duff. “This would prevent the disease from spreading to other regions of the brain, which is associated with more severe dementia.”What's t...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - July 19, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer awareness alzheimer patient care alzheimer science brain caring for dementia patients causes of alzheimer's disease memory treatment alzheimer's disease Source Type: blogs

The Doctors Club
By  ANISH KOKA, MD Vatsal Thakkar, a psychiatrist, recently wrote of the perks doctors are afforded in everyone’s favorite instrument of social justice – the New York Times. Dr. Thakkar speaks effectively and correctly about a broken health care system navigated best by pulling the ‘doctor’ card. Some on the progressive left have seized on this blatant disregard for egalitarianism as yet another example of a broken healthcare system, despite the fact that a two tiered system is exactly what they have been building over the last eight years. To be clear, there has always been special treatment accorded fellow doct...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Got that warm feeling?
  A condition called cerebellar ataxia is one manifestation of wheat’s effect on the human brain. This illness usually affects adults, average age of onset 48 years, though children can be affected, too. Symptoms consist of incoordination, falling, and incontinence. The typical situation involves a man or woman in their late 40s or early 50s who begins to experience difficulty walking a straight line, or feels like they are drifting to one side as they walk. Frequent stumbling when there is no obstacle in the way is common. This is due to degeneration of the cerebellum (visible on an MRI or CT scan of the brain), th...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 19, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle ataxia autoimmune brain cerebellar gluten grains incoordination neuropathy stumbling Source Type: blogs

Assessing Students: Why Background History Matters
Editor’s note: This is an excerpt of a post written by Tatyana Elleseff for her Smart Speech Therapy blog. Her full post can be read here. As a speech-language pathologist who works in an outpatient psychiatric, school-based setting, I frequently review previous evaluations on incoming students. I notice several common threads in these reports. In this post, I share my thoughts regarding the lack of background information in student assessment reports. Despite its key role in assessment, this section often gets left empty or includes only minimal details about the student’s age, grade level and reasons for referral. ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - July 19, 2016 Category: Speech Therapy Authors: Tatyana Elleseff Tags: Speech-Language Pathology Bilingual assessment Language Disorders Speech Disorders Source Type: blogs

Improving cancer drug testing
Balls of cells with their own ‘passport’ to help speed up cancer drug testingRelated items from OnMedicaNICE calls for safer use of controlled drugsEU membership best for cancer patients and research, say leading oncologistsCancer cases have risen 12% since mid-1990sStop smoking drugs not linked to rise in psychiatric side effectsGPs slash total antibiotic scrips by over 7% in a year (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - July 19, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: blogs

Spirituality vs. Mental Disorders: God Doesn’t Hate Medication
I grew up in a family that had high expectations of me, and I have personally struggled with anxiety. For several years, I thought that my anxiety was a normal part of life. I didn’t realize that I should not have been having full-blown anxiety at the age of nine, but I was. My family didn’t believe in mental illnesses, besides those that were obvious to the untrained eye. We did, however, attend a church regularly. I was highly interested in Christianity and studied it on my own. I was able to combat the unnatural anxiety through my relationship with God, and was able to overcome the anxiety throughout middle and high...
Source: World of Psychology - July 17, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Spencer Willoughby Tags: Anxiety and Panic Brain and Behavior Caregivers College Disorders Family General Parenting Personal Personality Psychology Spirituality Anxiolytic God Mental Disorder Nursing Source Type: blogs

Maternal Mental Health Screening: What I Wished I’d Had
When I was pregnant back in 1997, I wish my doctor had told me I might be at risk for postpartum depression. Her words wouldn’t have alarmed me. They would have prompted me to get treatment when the darkness did indeed hit. During my six-week postpartum checkup when I was at my worst, I wish my OB/GYN had handed me a mental health screening and explained the difference between the “blues” and depression. Perhaps I would have lied on the screening, although I doubt it. At the time I was desperately trapped inside my terrified silence. Only my husband knew how far I’d fallen until one night on the phone with my sist...
Source: World of Psychology - July 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura G Owens Tags: Depression Disorders General Health-related Parenting Personal Psychology Women's Issues Baby Blues Childbirth Hormonal Changes Mental Disorder Motherhood Obstetrics postpartum depression Pregnancy Source Type: blogs

Suicidal? 10 Tips for Keeping Yourself Alive
My name is Kelley. I remember having my first suicidal thought at the age of 13. At that time, I had discovered that my brother was gay and my sister and father completely abandoned him just because he was gay. I had been molested by a female when I was young and this information about my brother made me wonder if I was going to be gay, too. At the time, I had no clue how a person became gay. I went on to have tragedy after tragedy strike in my life. To name just a few, I have lost two children, both of my parents, breast cancer at the age of 40, double mastectomy, chemo, two reconstruction surgeries, discovering at the en...
Source: World of Psychology - July 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kelley McElreath Tags: Depression Disorders General Grief and Loss Personal Self-Help Trauma Cognition Psychology Suicide Thought Youtube Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: July 16, 2016
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! I must say, I hope you’ve all had a better week than I. During a quick getaway last weekend, I managed to catch a nasty summer cold (isn’t getting sick during the summer the worst?) and, suffice it to say, I’ve spent a lot of time couch surfing with a box of tissues and all manner of cold medicine that doesn’t. work. at. all. Cue sneezing fit. Still, I managed to scour the interwebs for some of the latest in mental health news just for you! Read on to find out the psychological benefits of writing, why time seems to go faster as we age, and — oh yeah — why ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders Health-related Medications Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Around the Net Research Technology Women's Issues benefits of writing Diet Exercise Fda Gratitude immune reactions Jef Source Type: blogs

The problem of polypharmacy in psychiatry
Polypharmacy was once the exception in psychiatry; now it seems to have become the rule. Patients frequently are taking 3, 4, even 5 psych meds at one time. And often it’s primary care doctors, not psychiatrists, who are doing the prescribing — usually without adequate training in psychiatry. Some polypharmacy is rational — e.g., a patient with bipolar disorder who receives the combination of antidepressant and mood stabilizer. But most polypharmacy is irrational — the result of carelessly adding meds without ever subtracting them; of treating each individual symptom separately; of chasing side effects;...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Medications Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

16 Warning Signs You Might Suffer from Conversion Disorder
Conversion disorder is a mental illness when neurological symptom exists without an explanation. Imagine you’re just finishing up your lunch break when you suddenly can’t move your legs. Up until this point, you were perfectly healthy with no signs of any kind of physical illness. It would be terrifying, to say the least — and this is exactly what happens when someone has conversion disorder. “Conversion disorder is a psychiatric condition diagnosed when an impairing neurological symptom exists without a medical or cultural explanation,” Dr. Jared Heathman explains. “Symptoms must not be...
Source: World of Psychology - July 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders Health-related Publishers Stress YourTango brain Child Neglect Conversion Disorder Hypnosis Magnetic Stimulation Mental Illness Muscles Neurobehavioral Program Neurological Symptoms Physical Illnes Source Type: blogs

Dear Mr. Slavitt, Please Come Visit My Office
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD Andy, if you want to fix primary care you must do some field research.  Come spend one day, or even a week at my office or another small primary care physicians’ office.  You need to see what we do on a daily basis and actually understand the view from a small practice perspective. This knowledge deficit is at the core of CMS’s problem.  You cannot repair what you do not comprehend. Once you understand what we are capable of doing, how we do it, and how it actually SAVES money in the long run, while still providing high quality, then you are ready to tackle Focusing on Primary Care for Bett...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What a medical student learned during his psychiatry rotation
Psychiatry was my first clinical rotation, and I did not know what to expect when I began. When I initially got assigned to the dialectal behavioral therapy (DBT) team, I had no clue what that would entail beyond working with some borderline patients and that the preconception of borderline patients is that they can be “the most difficult” patients to help due to their intense emotional instability, chronic feelings of worthlessness, self-destructive behaviors, and unstable relationships. While sitting at rounds each morning, I found that our clients unpredictably struggled and triumphed with different matters day in a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 11, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How to talk to your children about tragedy
I’m looking at a pile of little boy clothes outside my back door this morning. It often looks like this if we forget to clean up. My kids shed their clothes almost as soon as they are home in search of water play of some sort: hose on the slide, sprinklers, water gun fights. They are supposed to put their clothes in the hamper. That obviously doesn’t always happen. This is their life for the most part; their glorious, uncomplicated life so far. They wake up and play, they go to school, they come home and play, and their biggest worries are whether they get their favorite popsicle flavor or whether brother chose “my v...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 10, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

News. News. And Too Much News.
Oh my, time has been getting away from me  and it's been a bit since I've written a blog post on Shrink Rap!  First let me steer you over to Clinical Psychiatry News where ClinkShrink has written an article called "New Mexico High Court States that Assisted Suicide is not a Right."  If you surf over, you'll also note that Clink has a lovely new head shot up next to her article.As I've mentioned before, the Boston Globe's famed spotlight team is doing a series on the trouble public mental health system in Massachusetts.  The second installation went up on July 7th and discusses the roll of the polic...
Source: Shrink Rap - July 10, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Emotional
I have been ****SO**** overly emotional lately.  I am not sure if it is justified and normal or if I really am being dramatic and am feeling everything so much more extreme than I should.It is not unusual for me to wake up in the middle of the night, and many times I stay up.  The night before last, I woke up around 1 or 1:30.  I turned on the television, and I have no idea why, but no matter what station we have left the tv on when we turn it off, when we turn it on it is always on CNN.  It is the weirdest thing.When I turned on the television that night/morning, it was in the middle of the Dallas poli...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The perfect son. The perfect doctor.
Benjamin, Jr. was the apple of their eye. He was cute and inquisitive, and smart. Very, very smart. The minute he took his first breath into this world, his mom and dad had already ordained him as a future MD. He would become a doctor and follow in his father’s steps. No questions asked. He would become the second MD in the family. Every birthday, his parties were doctor-themed: kiddie stethoscopes, pretend syringes, colorful doctor-like toys. Each year, Ben grew taller, handsome, muscular, and loved airplanes. He grew into a good looking young man. In high school, he excelled in the sciences and math. Chemistry, bio...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 8, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Focusing on Primary Care for Better Health
By ANDY SLAVITT In the United States, we have historically invested far more in treating sickness than we do in maintaining health. The result of this imbalance is not only poorer health, but more money spent in institutions, hospitals, and nursing homes. The road to a better health care system means correcting this imbalance. We should reinvest in what we value — primary care — as a practice, as a profession, and as an abundant resource for patients. In recent years, we have begun taking a number of meaningful steps to begin this reinvestment process. Today, we are proposing significant actions to improve how we pay p...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Bad Apple or Bad Orchard? - A Narrative of Alleged Individual Research Misconduct that Sidestepped the Pharmaceutical Corporate Context
Conclusion So it seems that in this case a study which may not have been conducted according to research standards was likely a pharmaceutical sponsored, designed, and controlled Phase II trial done as part of an effort to seek approval for a new drug.  Hence this case was not only about allegations of individual research misconduct, but about yet more problems with the implementation of commercially controlled human experiments designed to ultimately further marketing as well as science.  Yet none of the public discussion so far of this case was about whether Pfizer had any responsibilities to assure the quality...
Source: Health Care Renewal - July 7, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: anechoic effect clinical research integrity clinical trials New York University Pfizer pharmaceuticals Source Type: blogs

I Guess An Explanation For My Anger
I saw my therapist/psychiatrist yesterday, and I was chomping at the bit to get out what had been bothering me since last weekend.Tara (she was like a little sister when I lived with her family after my mother had kicked me out) had sent out what I considered a frivolous "GoFundMe" page for $7k in donations.  For the record, she received no donations, the group conversation she sent virtually everyone left, and her mother said once she figured out how to deactivate it, she did. I guess I am validating myself - but I am not alone, just saying!  I had NO idea why I wnnt from 0 to 100 when I read the description for...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 7, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Adding mindfulness to the PTSD therapist’s toolkit
—– Soldiers who return home in casts and caskets are not the only ones struck down by the trauma of war. Many young military men and women carry emotional wounds far beyond the battlefield in the form of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This psychologically crippling condition cannot be treated with bandages or surgery, and often lasts for years on end. But new research has now demonstrated that mindfulness—a non-judgmental awareness of our thoughts and feelings—might be a useful tool for veterans battling PTSD. Rather than being stuck in disturbing memories and negative thoughts, they can use mindfulness to ...
Source: SharpBrains - July 7, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness behavior-therapy brain brain-activity exposure therapy meditation mindfulness post-traumatic-stress-disorder psychological Psychology PTSD Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs’ July Issue: ACA Coverage, Health Spending, And More
The July issue of Health Affairs, a variety issue, covers a broad range of topics: the Affordable Care Act (ACA) coverage provisions; improvements in emergency department care; trends in health spending by different income groups; efforts by accountable care organizations (ACOs) to improve behavioral health care; and others. US emergency department death rates reduced by 48 percent, 1997-2011 Despite a wealth of literature about the relationship between emergency care and subsequent mortality for selected conditions, little is known about overall mortality trends in the emergency department (ED). In what is believed to be...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - July 6, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Chris Fleming Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Featured ACA Marketplaces Health Affairs journal medical marijuana tobacco Source Type: blogs