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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 3.

These doctors were shamed and bullied for being sick
We go to the doctor when we are sick. But what happens when doctors get sick? Who cares for them? All too often, physicians are threatened, harassed, even terminated for being ill. After reporting on a psychiatrist fired for having cancer and a pediatrician bullied for her brain tumor, I’ve heard from many more physicians who are now courageously stepping forward to tell the truth — in their own words: Andrea Seiffertt, DO I got a migraine with aura on Newborn ICU (NICU) call. I literally couldn’t read the orders and had to call over my resident and tell her I had to lie down in the next 10 minutes before the pain ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Why doctors are rebelling against saving lives
When I was in medical school, “real” doctors saved lives. Period. Specialists who focused on a patient’s quality of life, (the plastic surgeons, bariatric surgeons, holistic practitioners, infertility experts, etc.) were considered sellouts. (We won’t even consider the med school status of future psychiatrists.) We disparaged these doctors because they could be saving lives and chose not to, because they were often paid (God forbid) out-of-pocket by their patients, and because they actively self-promoted themselves to the public (another doctor no-no). These “greedy” docs were scorned as entrepreneurs in a prof...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 23, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-breen" rel="tag" > Michael Breen, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Dec 22, Gail Wyatt: Today in the History of Psychology (22nd December 1944)
Gail Wyatt was born. Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Dr. Wyatt was the first African-American woman to be licensed as a psychologist in the state of California. A pioneering and influential researcher, Dr. Wyatt has testified on numerous occasions before the United States Congress in relation to health policy issues. In 1992, Gail Wyatt received the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contribution to Research in Public Policy, part of the official citation for which read: 'Her research significantly advanced our...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - December 23, 2016 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Posting Quickly
I am still just so...different. Erratic? I do not feel sad anymore, but when I say " anymore " , I mean yesterday, just one day.The things I have been saying, that I have thought at the time have been okay to say, my lord. Now it is to Mark ' s family members, and I have never ever meddled in their affairs. I even said something to their mother, but we were sharing, a really good, deep conversation on text and I felt comfortable with her. I did make a comment about a topic that is extremely sensitive to her.I think I can make it brief. Their brother is somewhat estranged, but he does see his p...
Source: bipolar.and.me - December 22, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Behavioral health has it backwards. The answer is positive psychiatry: Here ’s why
I will not argue that drugs are “bad” and holistic care is “good.” I have seen the way medications can transform a person’s life for the better, and I could never invalidate the experience of someone living with mental illness. But I will argue vehemently that holistic, preventive, and integrative health measures should come first, and medication should be used as a secondary option. The current structure of psychiatry — and the way these physicians are financially reimbursed — has it backwards. Enter: positive psychiatry. It’s a progressive movement that says financial investments should promote pr...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 22, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jamie-katuna" rel="tag" > Jamie Katuna < /a > Tags: Video Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

ECHO Improves Rural Physician Access to Subspecialty Expertise
The Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) was started at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, after several noticed extraordinarily long waits for hepatitis C care in New Mexico. The effort has resulted in an international effect, with more than ninety hubs participating in the effort, offering subspecialist guidance to primary care physicians, nurses, and other clinicians across the United States and in twelve other countries. The hub-and-spoke model used in ECHO had previously been used to transform the field of aviation, and is now being applied to the continuing education of primary ca...
Source: Policy and Medicine - December 22, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

7 Practical Tips for Relieving Holiday Depression
For highly-sensitive folks and people predisposed to sadness, the holidays create a perfect storm for depression. There’s the added stress of holiday shopping, decorating, and parties — not to mention dealing with strained family relations; snowball and gingerbread cookies seem to stalk you; and a sense of forced merriment has a way of making you feel like a total loser if you change the radio station when “Jingle Bells” comes on. According to research posted by the American Psychological Association, two-thirds of people said they felt stressed and fatigued during the holidays. Half said they felt ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Anxiety and Panic Depression Family Holiday Coping Mindfulness Self-Help Stress Bipolar Holiday Stress Mood Disorder Panic Attacks Relaxation Rumination Self Care stress reduction winter blue Worry Source Type: blogs

Teva to Distribute Pharmaceutical Grade Marijuana Dispenser
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, a famous Israeli pharma, is entering the medical marijuana industry by partnering with Syqe Medical, a company based in Tel Aviv, to distribute the Syqe inhaler. The Syqe inhaler is marketed as being the “world’s first selective-dose pharmaceutical grade medicinal plants inhaler,” capable of delivering marijuana to within 100 micrograms. There are two versions of the inhaler, including one for in-hospital use and one for patients to use at home. The idea of a selective-dose inhaler is that it can be adjusted to deliver a nearly identical dose at every use. This is important...
Source: Medgadget - December 19, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Oncology Pain Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

End-of-year musings
It’s my last post for the year. It has been an extraordinary year, lots of surprises, shocks and enough excitement for anyone! I’m not even going to start on the political changes, here in NZ we’ve had yet another major earthquake, excitement as ACC (our national accident insurer) sets up new pain service contracts (with a LOT of people who haven’t been involved in pain management before… there’s an experiment in the making!), and continuing road cone carnage on the streets of Christchurch. On the pain news front, I can’t think of any incredibly ground-breaking news – althoug...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - December 18, 2016 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Clinical reasoning Occupational therapy Resilience/Health Science in practice biopsychosocial disability Pain pain management Therapeutic approaches treatment values Source Type: blogs

Home Inspection and Double Billing: Two Kindle Novels for Free, and Happy Holidays to Our Shrink Rap Readers
Happy Holidays!At this time of year, I like to set up free downloads to two of my novels. You can get these books for free on your Kindle from Sunday to Thursday.Double Billing is the story of a woman whose life changes when she discovers she has an identical twin. It's a quick read with a little  psychiatry sprinkled in.  One reviewer said: The book was a page-turner because of elegant structure and pacing.  I really cared about the author ’s take on things –because she is a psychiatrist? because I’ve followed  her blog for a while? – which meant that I was interested in the protagonist’...
Source: Shrink Rap - December 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Shopping Trends and Physicians
By JIM PURCELL It has happened.  For the first time, consumers are purchasing more on line than in stores.  Even Black Friday 2016 with its emphasis on traditional shopping saw more people buying on line than in stores (44% compared to 40%).  Mobile phone sales on Cyber Monday, at $1.07 Billion, were up 34% over last year, and Cyber Monday sales exceeded Black Friday’s sales according to Adobe Digital.  Personally, I would rather chew off my right pinkie than venture to a mall on Black Friday, but I did shop online taking me two minutes, without moving from my desk. The traditional consumer shopping world is changing...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Hurting medical students healing hurting patients
As a medical student, I have encountered more emotional and psychological pain as a direct result of my training than I could have previously anticipated. My pain may not be physical (though sometimes it is secondary to sleep deprivation), but it is real. I look around me and am reminded of who I do not want to be, and the kind of person I would dread becoming. At first, I thought this was a result of primarily surgical rotations, where the focus is not patient interaction. I figured this was why I was experiencing such disconnect within myself. But now, as I finish a month of inpatient pediatrics, I see that the hurt has ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anonymous" rel="tag" > Anonymous < /a > Tags: Education Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Dec 16, Robert Resnick: Today in the History of Psychology (16th December 1940)
Robert Resnick was born. A pioneer in the study and treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Resnick established one of the first ADHD clinics in the United States. Resnick is also renowned for his role as a passionate defender of professional practice within psychology; exemplified in 1977 when he acted as lead complainant in the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling recognizing psychology as both an autonomous profession and an economic competitor of psychiatry. Robert Resnick was elected president of the American Psychological Association in 1995 and received the American Psychological Foundation Gol...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - December 17, 2016 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Lessons From The Field: How Local Innovators Are Reshaping How Doctors Are Trained
The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation spent the past year traveling the country to discover what different regions were doing to better align physician residency training programs with the many changes occurring in health care delivery.  The model of graduate medical education (GME) in the United States is held in high esteem both here and around the world, but it needs to adapt to an environment of constrained resources coupled with expanding societal health needs. The foundation partnered with six academic institutions (Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tennessee; University of Texas System MD Anderson Cancer Center in Hous...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - December 15, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: George Thibault Tags: Featured GrantWatch Health Professionals Organization and Delivery Source Type: blogs

Be prepared mentally, physically, and socially for residency
Nothing compares to the apprehension of starting residency. OK, that’s not true, but it’s really high up there on nerve-wracking firsts. I remember my first day as a resident. In a matter of a few hours, I went from being human furniture to being asked to make life-altering decisions. I was overwhelmed, to say the least. Here are some pieces of advice that I wish senior residents would have emphasized before I started this journey. Be prepared: Mentally This should be obvious to any person with a type A personality (i.e., most physicians). Nevertheless, it’s vital to have the tools of the trade before you start see...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nora-ekeanya" rel="tag" > Nora Ekeanya, DO < /a > Tags: Education Hospital Residency Source Type: blogs

PODCAST: Aspirin, Yes; Psych Meds, No – Why the Difference?
In this week’s Psych Central Show, Gabe and Vincent discuss why so many people stop taking medication for psychiatric disorders or even refuse to start on them at all.  In a society that is always searching for a “magic pill,” why are so many people resistant to the idea of taking medication to treat mental illness?  Why do doctors and others so easily dismiss the complaints of side effects?  And does stigma prevent many from getting the treatment they need?  Gabe and Vincent give advice and reassurance on how to cope with the many pitfalls of being “med compliant.” Listen as Our Hosts Discuss Issues Surrou...
Source: World of Psychology - December 15, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Antidepressant General Medications The Psych Central Show Treatment Gabe Howard Mental Health Mental Illness Stigma mental illness treatment Psych Meds Psychiatric Medications Source Type: blogs

21st Century Cures Act Becomes Law, Improves U.S. National Mental Health Efforts
When President Obama signed the 21st Century Cures Act on December 13th, he signed into law one of the most sweeping efforts to provide additional programs and funding for health conditions and innovation in America, including cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, opioid addiction, medical devices, access to new drugs, and mental health. The Cures Act includes the major provisions of the Senate mental health compromise bill, Mental Health Reform Act of 2016, as well as a few additional provisions from the House’s over-reaching Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act of 2016 bill. While the bill goes a long way in h...
Source: World of Psychology - December 13, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy 21st century cures Helping Families in Crisis mental health reform act Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Universal Health Services (UHS) Skewered (Again) by New Report
This report should act as a wake-up call for the entire inpatient psychiatric hospital industry. This is a story we’ve heard before in the healthcare industry — one where certain hospitals put profit over patient care. This new report from BuzzFeed News is the latest in-depth investigative piece of journalism that has delved into the problems at Universal Health Services (UHS). After the report was released, the public company’s stock price dropped nearly 12 percent. But this isn’t the first time UHS has been the target of investigative journalism and state investigations — see the end of thi...
Source: World of Psychology - December 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Treatment forced treatment inpatient psychiatric hospital UHS universal health services Source Type: blogs

Dr. Ed Hallowell Is Speaking In Vancouver, Unwrapping The Gifts Of ADHD
Dr. Ed Hallowell, Web,  Twitter,  Facebook,  Youtube has ADHD has written many books on ADHD, taught at Harvard Medical school and is also a great speaker who talks about the challenges AND the positives of ADHD. Given the name of my blog, I appreciate his role as the pioneer of those who talk about the positives of ADHD, when many just see 99% pathology in us ADDers and not much else. I recommend his books on ADHD to all my adult ADHD coaching clients and the members of my Vancouver Adult ADD Support Group. Dr. Hallowell is speaking in Vancouver on Sunday, December 11, 2016, from 4:00pm – 5:30pm at Vancouver...
Source: Adult ADD Strengths - December 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Pete Quily Tags: ADD / ADHD Conferences and Workshops Vancouver Source Type: blogs

Why this physician chose internal medicine
On November 1973, I had an epiphany.  My first week on my internal medicine clerkship, I realized that I had found my specialty: internal medicine. Prior to medical school, I had worked with emotionally disturbed children in an inpatient hospital.  I really enjoyed the experience, and learned a great deal.  During my first two miserable years in medical school (I disliked how they taught the basic sciences and even more how they tested), I had considered pediatrics, psychiatry, and a great blend in adolescent medicine.  Parts of medicine fascinated me, but getting out of the classroom was freedom. I started my third ye...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 8, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/robert-centor" rel="tag" > Robert Centor, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

How to Keep Fear from Stealing Your Life
“Fear is a sneaky thief, stealing away precious moments of your life.” – Elizabeth Lesser Everyone has been afraid at some point. If we’re in touch with our inner selves, we know right away when that negative emotion starts clutching at our hearts. It’s a feeling of coldness, one that sneaks up and grabs hold. You can try to shrug it off, but that’s not always easy, and it rarely works. You can tell yourself this too shall pass, yet not really believe it. The truth about fear, however, is that it can be overcome. Here are some ways to do just that. Acknowledge that the emotion you feel is fear. The first s...
Source: World of Psychology - December 7, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety and Panic Inspiration & Hope LifeHelper Motivation and Inspiration Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Coping Skills Fear Worry Source Type: blogs

Neuropathology History: D ésiré Magloire Bourneville (1840-1909)
D ésiré Magloire Bourneville (1840-1909)Born in Garenci éres, France. From 1905 until his death, Bourneville headed the Foundation Vallée for the Study of Feebleminded Children.  " Was recognized as the leading continental authority on all aspects of mental abnormality of children. Most of his neuropathologic work was onidiocy. His description of tuberous sclerosis, since known as Bourneville ' s disease, appeared in 1880. "Source: Haymaker, Webb (Army Institute of Pathology). Guide to the exhibit on the history of neuropathology. Presented at the annual meetings of the American Psychiatric Association (Washington...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 7, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: history Source Type: blogs

Many of the same genes that  influence our personality also affect our mental health
By Christian Jarrett We know from twin and family studies that our personality is to a large degree – probably around 40 per cent – inherited. Geneticists are busy trying to find the specific gene variants involved, but because each one on its own only exerts a modest influence, this is challenging research requiring huge samples. A new study in Nature Genetics has made a significant contribution, using the technique of Genome Wide Analysis to look for genetic variants that correlate with personality. The researchers led by Min-Tzu Lo at the University of California, San Diego have identified variations in six genet...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 7, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Mental health Personality Source Type: blogs

What You ’ re Doing Wrong When Forming Your Goals
This article will help you to break down your goals so that they are much less overwhelming and more attainable. What Is a Habit? Habit Definition: A settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up. Habits are something that we do without consciously realizing it. For example, biting our nails, drinking coffee while watching the news, or scratching the same spot even when it doesn’t itch. Habits are something that we once started, and now habitually do on a regular basis. Breaking the Goal Down To reach a goal, we must comprise our day of many little habits that lead us to our goal. We...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Madison Ferry Tags: Exercise & Fitness Habits LifeHelper Self-Help Success & Achievement breaking habits Habit Formation Obesity Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Neuropathology History: Sir Edward Farquhar Buzzard (1871-1945)
" Born in London... Became Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford University, and consulting physician at St. Thomas ' s Hospital (1928). In the field of neuropathology, he is well known for his textbook in collaboration with Greenfield (1921)... Important also were his studies on myasthenia gravis (to which he contributed the term ' lymphorrhages ' ) (1905), chronic progressive cerebral softening (1906),... delayed traumatic apoplexy (1909), and epidemic encephalitis (1919). "Sir Edward Farquhar Buzzard (1871-1945)Source: Haymaker, Webb (Army Institute of Pathology). Guide to the exhibit on the history of neuropathology. ...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 6, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: history Source Type: blogs

The Push for Suicide Prevention
(Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 6, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Joshua Gordon Source Type: blogs

Neuropathology History: Carl Wernicke (1848-1905)
" Born in Tarnowitz, Poland... A highly original thinker, he can be said to have been a pupil only of Meynert, though he was greatly influenced by the works of Hitzig and Munk. "Carl Wernicke (1848-1905)Source: Haymaker, Webb (Army Institute of Pathology). Guide to the exhibit on the history of neuropathology. Presented at the annual meetings of the American Psychiatric Association (Washington, DC, May 17-20, 1948) and the American Neurological Association (Atlantic City, June 14-17, 1948). (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - December 5, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: history Source Type: blogs

In the Company of Death; In Consortium Mortis
By Mark Ligorski#1. BeginningsJust like in superhero movies, there is always a back story. This is mine.After graduating medical school in 1981, I went to work at St. Vincent ’s Medical Center on Staten Island for the next two years, the first spent in rotating through the different areas of medicine and surgery and then a year of Internal Medicine. 100 hour work weeks were typical, with on call shifts every 3rd or 4th night.People stayed in hospital for weeks at a time; there were still wards with four to six patients. Intensive and cardiac care units were still pretty new. TheKaren Ann Quinlan case ...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - December 3, 2016 Category: Palliative Care Tags: advanced directives code status CPR ligorski respirator Source Type: blogs

Sleep deprived and exhausted? These tips will help.
I’m just coming out of two years of sleep deprivation. Due to some sleep apnea issues (hopefully finally resolved), my now two-year-old daughter slept like a newborn until this summer. Which means, like the mom of a newborn, I was up every three hours at night for the last two years. This has given me more experience in living with sleep deprivation than I ever wanted and plenty of time to think about how to survive when exhausted. What did I learn while functioning through two years of sleep deprivation? Self-care matters even more when you’re not sleeping. When I’m sleep deprived, I either don’t want to eat, or ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 1, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/katie-fortenberry" rel="tag" > Katie Fortenberry, PhD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Final 4 final days to join 160+ pioneers and help reinvent brain health in the digital age
—– Dear SharpBrains reader, Please consider joining what promises to be a comprehensive and very stimulating conversation about best ways to reinvent brain health in the digital age. So far we are counting on 160+ sharp brains in 16 countries — and the more the merrier! Since the event is fully virtual, it requires no travel. If you haven’t registered yet, you can do so Here. Here’s the updated Summit Agenda, and here are some answers to frequently asked questions. PS: Circles above represent registrants so far; the darker the circle the more participants in that city. We are very happy to see so many voices...
Source: SharpBrains - December 1, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology Brain-health digital age reinvent Source Type: blogs

Final 3 days to join 160+ pioneers and help reinvent brain health in the digital age
—– Dear SharpBrains reader, Please consider joining what promises to be a comprehensive and very stimulating conversation about best ways to reinvent brain health in the digital age. So far we are counting on 160+ sharp brains in 16 countries — and the more the merrier! Since the event is fully virtual, it requires no travel. If you haven’t registered yet, you can do so Here. Here’s the updated Summit Agenda, and here are some answers to frequently asked questions. PS: Circles above represent registrants so far; the darker the circle the more participants in that city. We are very happy to see so many voices...
Source: SharpBrains - December 1, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology Brain-health digital age reinvent Source Type: blogs

Kanye and Mentally Ill Creative Artists
Looking back, I always knew there was something about Kanye that...made him very impulsive with his emotions and at times using poor judgment because of it. I never thought much about it, about his being mentally ill, although now I see the signs were there.Who analyzes people for mental illness for absolutely no good reason in their daily lives? That sounds depressing and way too much focus on other ' s behavior. I would rather shrug it off as " well, that was certainly weird " . I can ' t save the world or judge others, let alone be some weirdo trying to warn Kanye he is mentally ill.Yet, again, looki...
Source: bipolar.and.me - December 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Rubber Bands, Yoga Mats, and Trial Meeting Error
“Snap a rubber band,” a well-meaning counselor advises. “Practice mindfulness. Don’t interfere with the intrusive thoughts when they strike,” a well-intentioned doctor counsels. “If you expose yourself to the screaming thoughts, their intensity will slowly fade,” a seasoned practitioner recommends. Feeling overwhelmed? That makes two of us. As mental health consumers, we seek answers for the whirring madness in our minds. We limp to psychologists and psychiatrists, stockpile the latest self-help books, and embrace the latest diet fads. If I just follow the Atkins diet or Paleo diet or the ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Matthew Loeb Tags: Anxiety and Panic Brain and Behavior Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Self-Help Stress Anxious Thoughts Intrusive Thoughts overwhelm Worry Source Type: blogs

It Happened! Link to Yesterday's NPR Diane Rehm Show on Involuntary Psychiatric Care
The third time scheduled was a charm and we had a wonderful time going in to Washington to be on Diane Rehm's talk show.  Okay, so the car wouldn't start at first, and I missed a turn, but we got there without event.  The show included our friend, Pete Earley, and two people who had experienced involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations, Lily and Jaime -- they both did a great job of talking about their experiences.  Pete, the author ofCrazy: A Father's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness and more recently co-author of the novelTreason,  added a lot of life to the issue by talking about how har...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

How Value-Based Payment Arrangements Should Measure Behavioral Health
Value-based payment (VBP) models have the dual aim of reducing costs and improving quality of care. A typical VBP approach identifies potential savings by establishing baseline health care costs for specific conditions or populations. The model assumes that the potential for sharing savings generated against the baseline costs will incentivize providers within the network to use more effective treatments and improve outcomes. A key challenge is to document that providers are in fact offering better quality of care and are being paid for value, as opposed to generating shared savings by limiting access to services. To do th...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - November 29, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Robert Myers, Lloyd Sederer, Thomas Smith and Joshua Berezin Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Health Policy Lab Payment Policy Public Health Behavioral Health Substance Use Disorders value-based payment Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: A Follow-Up Post on FITNESS-NHS
By David Tuller, DrPH David Tuller is academic coordinator of the concurrent masters degree program in public health and journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. Last week’s post on FITNET-NHS and Esther Crawley stirred up a lot of interest. I guess people get upset when researchers cite shoddy “evidence” from poorly designed trials to justify foisting psychological treatments on kids with a physiological disease. I wanted to post some additional bits and pieces related to the issue. ***** I sent Dr. Crawley a link to last week’s post, offering her an opportunity to send her response to Dr. Racaniello ...
Source: virology blog - November 28, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial cognitive behavioral therapy FITNET-NHS graded exercise therapy mecfs PACE Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: A Follow-Up Post on FITNET-NHS
By David Tuller, DrPH David Tuller is academic coordinator of the concurrent masters degree program in public health and journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. Last week’s post on FITNET-NHS and Esther Crawley stirred up a lot of interest. I guess people get upset when researchers cite shoddy “evidence” from poorly designed trials to justify foisting psychological treatments on kids with a physiological disease. I wanted to post some additional bits and pieces related to the issue. ***** I sent Dr. Crawley a link to last week’s post, offering her an opportunity to send her response to Dr. Racaniello ...
Source: virology blog - November 28, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information chronic fatigue syndrome clinical trial cognitive behavioral therapy FITNET-NHS graded exercise therapy mecfs PACE Source Type: blogs

Finding Your Center as a Nurse...and Human Being
In some spiritual traditions, there is a notion of finding one ' s center, the balancing point---the fulcrum--upon which your life can balance. In your nursing career, finding your center is an important practice, even as you and your life change with time. The center of your career may very well be a moving target; are you currently in touch with yours?A Moving TargetThe center of your nursing career---the place at which you find your deepest satisfaction and soul work---is indeed a moving target. When you first graduate from nursing school, your satisfaction may come from performing your first catheterization or central ...
Source: Digital Doorway - November 28, 2016 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development nurse nurse career nurse careers nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

Finding Your Center as a Nurse...and as a Human Being
In some spiritual traditions, there is a notion of finding one ' s center, the balancing point---the fulcrum--upon which your life can balance. In your nursing career, finding your center is an important practice, even as you and your life change with time. The center of your career may very well be a moving target; are you currently in touch with yours?A Moving TargetThe center of your nursing career---the place at which you find your deepest satisfaction and soul work---is indeed a moving target. When you first graduate from nursing school, your satisfaction may come from performing your first catheterization or central ...
Source: Digital Doorway - November 28, 2016 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development nurse nurse career nurse careers nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

Nov 26, Dr. Alois Alzheimer: Today in the History of Psychology (26th November 1901)
At a Hospital for the Mentally ill in Frankfurt, Germany, Dr. Alois Alzheimer interviewed and examined Auguste Deter; famously known as patient 'Auguste D' whose symptoms included, paranoia, aphasia and severe memory and psychosocial impairment. Keen to study the neuropathological features of her illness, Dr. Alzheimer maintained a close interest in the case of Auguste D up until her death on the 8th April 1906. On the 4th November 1906, at the 37th annual conference of South West German psychiatrists, in T übingen, Germany, Alzheimer gave a lecture titled 'Über eine eigenartige Erkrankung der Hirnrinde' (About a Peculia...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - November 27, 2016 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Involuntary Psychiatric Care-- a Discussion on NPR's Diane Rehm Show on Tuesday : the Third Time's a Charm
I've posted twice about how we will be discussing our new book,Committed, on theDiane Rehm Show on National Public Radio.  Well, national politics have gotten in the way, and we've been rescheduled for more time-sensitive issues.  So I'm excited to tell you that we will be on the Diane Rehm Show this Tuesday, November 29th, during the second hour of the show -- 11 AM if you're listening on WAMU, 88.5 FM.  Only it's gotten better -- while the show was originally supposed to be just the two authors, the programming has changed: Pete Earley, who wrote the foreword, will be joining us in the studio, and two...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 27, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Dementia Care 10 Practical Suggestions for Coping With Grief
This article discusses10 practical, down-to-earth suggestions for dealing with grief.Some of the 10 suggestions below were taken from my interview with Dianne Gray, President of the Elisabeth K übler-Ross Foundation. See the end of this article for details about the other sources cited.10 Practical Suggestions for Coping With Grief1. Love yourself unconditionally (Gray): Ms. Gray says this is the single most important thing to do when you are grieving.Alzheimer's 3 Little Words That Work2. Accept your feelings and know they are normal (APA): The APA article states that “People experience all kinds of emotions after the ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 25, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: care of dementia patients care of dementia patients at home dementia care dementia caregiver elderly dementia care grief health help alzheimer's help with dementia care memory care facility Source Type: blogs

Thankful to have become an internist
November 1973 I had an epiphany.  My first week on my internal medicine clerkship, I realized that I had found my specialty – internal medicine. Prior to medical school I had worked with emotionally disturbed children in an inpatient hospital.  I really enjoyed the experience, and learned a great deal.  During my first two miserable years in medical school (I disliked how they taught the basic sciences and even more how they tested), I had considered pediatrics, psychiatry, and a great blend in adolescent medicine.  Parts of medicine fascinated me, but getting out of the classroom was freedom. I started my third ...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - November 24, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Warning: Medical school may kill your child
Cheryl lost her son Sean to suicide in medical school. Just a few months ago. Her only child. Cheryl didn’t know that medical students were at high risk of suicide — until her son was dead. Nobody warned her. Rhonda lost her daughter Kaitlyn to suicide in medical school. Unable to recuperate from the pain of her daughter’s suicide, Rhonda died by suicide one year later. Rhonda didn’t know that medical students were at high risk of suicide — until her daughter was dead. Nobody warned her. Michele lost her only son Kevin to suicide in medical school last year. Just three weeks before he was to graduate. In...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Care 14 Holiday Communication Tips for Caregivers and Families
Alzheimer's and dementia care are difficult during the Holidays. The big question - Should you take your loved one living with dementia to Holiday celebrations outside the home? Our memory care expert Dr. Rita A. Jablonski-Jaudon says yes.By Rita A. Jablonski-JaudonAlzheimer's Reading RoomThis week marks the beginning of theholiday season— and the beginning of the onslaught of telephone messages from families, asking me the same question —Should Mom or Dad living with dementia attend celebrations during the Holidays?10 Commandments of Alzheimer's CaregivingMy answer is yes.The MINDSET study is an FDA Approved Clinical ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 22, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer communication alzheimer's care alzheimer's caregiving care of dementia patients dementia care health help alzheimer's help with dementia care lifestyle memory care facility Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: The New FITNET Trial for Kids
This reportorial conflict-of-interest was not disclosed in the BBC story itself. (In fact, the Countess of Mar, a member of the House of Lords and a longtime advocate for ME/CFS patients, has filed a formal complaint with the BBC to protest its biased reporting on FITNET-NHS. In her complaint, she noted that “the BBC coverage was so hyperbolic and it afforded the FITNET trial so much publicity that it was clearly organised as a counter-punch to the anti-PACE evidence which is now gaining world-wide attention.”) As a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome, cognitive behavior therapy is grounded in an unproven hypothesis...
Source: virology blog - November 22, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information CFS chronic fatigue syndrome FITNET-NHS Magenta study myalgic encephalomyocarditis PACE trial Source Type: blogs

Happy 90th Birthday, Academic Medicine! Part II
To celebrate the journal’s 90th birthday this year, members of the editorial office and editorial board selected influential, interesting, and fun articles from the archive to share with you. Below is Part II of our dive into the archive. Check out Part I here. For more about the journal’s history, check out this timeline of milestones from the last 90 years. We hope you enjoy these highlights from our archive. In the comments section below or on Twitter using #HappyBDayAcMed, please share you own favorite articles with us.   Toni Gallo, Senior Staff Editor Our Post-Convention Caribbean Cruise Did you know...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 21, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured #HappyBDayAcMed art in medicine assessment Flexner Report history of medicine teaching and learning moments women in academic medicine Source Type: blogs

Open Payments Discussed at MedPAC November Meeting
The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission meets publicly in Washington, D.C. to discuss various Medicare issues and policy questions, as well as to develop and approve reports and recommendations to Congress. During the November public meeting, Ariel Winter and Amy Phillips discussed, “Payments from drug and device manufacturers to physicians and teaching hospitals, 2015.” Ms. Winter and Ms. Phillips discussed the background and description of the Open Payments (public reporting) program, results of their analysis of 2015 data from Open Payments, as well as possible future changes to Open Payments. Background The pai...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 21, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

It ’s time to phase out the word “psychosomatic”
Psychosomatic. I learned not to use that word forty years ago, after I’d told a patient her malady might be psychosomatic in origin. She turned red, jumped up, and on her way out said, “I hope you fall into an open manhole and die!” Well, maybe I should’ve been more circumspect. I hadn’t realized until then that people can understand “psychosomatic” in a different way than I do. I’d meant what I still do, that the mind can affect the body. She thought psychosomatic was code for imaginary, as though I’d said it was all in her mind. And I suspect most of us believe that psychosomatic mea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 20, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jeff-kane" rel="tag" > Jeff Kane, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Too Much Latuda = Weird Suicidal Thoughts
When I went to my psychiatrist last week, I told her about my strange thoughts. I was thinking a lot about suicide, but the thoughts seemed to have started not in my mind, but somehow outside of my mind, as a color. I found it hard to describe and probably went on a bit too much trying to describe it as best I could but it really was strange.I used to think in music, for a very long time. For someone who thinks in numbers or has never thought about how they think besides an internal conversation - if there is one or they are aware of one, I often wonder what goes through their mind - how do they think? ...
Source: bipolar.and.me - November 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs