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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 2.

What a psychiatrist learned when she tried to connect with her colleagues
Over the past couple of months, I have had the privilege of meeting with several colleagues in my community. When I contacted them, I offered to bring them lunch if they would give me a few minutes to share an idea about a project that I am really excited about. However, what I really wanted was a chance to engage with physicians who I knew little more than their name and specialty. This experience was enlightening: Conversations were insightful and inspiring when I was able to actually meet my colleagues.  I fully expected the biggest challenge during these lunches would be colleagues who could not share my vision or wer...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/tracy-asamoah" rel="tag" > Tracy Asamoah, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Patients are evaluated for assisted suicide the wrong way
Laws that allow assisted suicide restrict the provision of “aid-in-dying” drugs to patients whose mental status is not impaired and who are capable of sound judgment. Medscape recently featured a video interview of Timothy Quill, the palliative-care specialist and long-term assisted suicide activist. He is interviewed by the ethicist Arthur Caplan, and the two discuss the psychological evaluation of terminally ill patients who request physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Several points made by Quill caught my attention. For example, when it comes to the proper psychological evaluation of patients seeking PAS, Quill doesn...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 20, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michel-accad" rel="tag" > Michel Accad, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Palliative care Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173. Question 1 What arm do most people hold their babies? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet2017184592'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink2017184592')) The Left The phenomenon, which is called left-side bias or left-cradling bias, encourages the right side of the brain to process emotions and ability to monitor the baby. It occurs 70-85% of the time in humans. However, human...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five ADHD anxiety bee stings depression dixon of dock green left cradling bias mees lines narcissistic personality OCD phonism rheumatoid arthritis whinnie-the-pooh Source Type: blogs

Jan 19, David Rosenhan: Today in the History of Psychology (19th January 1973)
David Rosenhan's classic article "On Being Sane in Insane Places" was published in the journal Science. Introduced with the question "If sanity and insanity exist, how shall we know them?" Rosenhan's paper outlined the details and addressed the implications of, a study conducted between 1969 and 1972 in which he and several colleagues gained admission to various psychiatric hospitals by faking a single symptom; namely, that they had been hearing voices. Upon admission to a psychiatric ward, Rosenhan and his fellow participants would immediately cease simulating any symptoms of abnormality. Rosehan's central question was, w...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - January 20, 2017 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Patients Wander Due to Excess Tau In the Brain's Navigational System
This study clearly shows that tau pathology, beginning in the entorhinal cortex, can lead to deficits in grid cell firing andunderlies the deterioration of spatial cognition that we see in human Alzheimer ’s disease, ” said Eric Kandel, MD, Nobel laureate, University Professor and Kavli Professor of Brain Science at CUMC. “This is a classic advance in our understanding of the early stages of Alzheimer ’s disease.”“This study is the first to show a link between grid cells and Alzheimer’s disease. These findings will be crucial for future attempts to understand the development of early Alzheimer’s diseas...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - January 19, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer missing alzheimer's awareness alzheimers alzheimers wandering care of dementia patients care of dementia patients at home dementia care elderly dementia care Source Type: blogs

Physicians! 7 steps to financial freedom
I grew up studying my physician parents. My dad, a pathologist, was a hard-working hospital employee with multiple odd jobs on the side. He always worried about whether he’d have enough for retirement, though he never really wanted to retire. My mom, a psychiatrist, is more of an entrepreneurial businesswoman. She had her own private practice (even though all the other employed doctors warned she’d never make it going solo). Guess who earned more money? And retired early? My mom (she retired 30 years before my dad). As a family doc in my clinic, I do a ton of psychiatry. In fact, psychology dictates our financial succe...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 19, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

New Common Rule Regs Mean New Training for IRB Members
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Yesterday, the Department of Health & Human Services released the long-awaited, and debated, new Common Rule. Many of the proposals that were released in earlier versions for public comment did not make their way into the rule. All IRB members will also need to undergo training to incorporate the new rules into their reviews. Though many experts in research ethics will be writing on this in great detail, I offer a brief synopsis of the changes here.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 19, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Human Subjects Research & IRBs Psychiatric Ethics Research Ethics Science Common Rule Source Type: blogs

Why America fails at psychiatric care
An article released in the JAMA sites evidence that the suicide rate in America has risen by 24 percent in the last 15 years associated with a significant reduction in the numbers of psychiatric beds available. The U.S. has had a lower capacity for psychiatric patients than comparable countries in Europe for years, but between 1998 and 2013 that number dropped even further. Waiting in the ER for days This trend has resulted in atrocious treatment of people with mental illness. Because it is so difficult to find room in a mental hospital for patients with mental conditions that make it unsafe for them to return home, like s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 19, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/janice-boughton" rel="tag" > Janice Boughton, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Study Confirms Pets Benefit Mental Health
      A new scientific study published in the BioMedCentral Psychiatry journal confirms what many people already knew intuitively: people with mental illness benefit from pet ownership. This short animated video explains the findings. The helpful nature of pets includes providing routine, exercise, and acceptance. Those surveyed rated their pets in a primary role of social importance and support. Dogs, cats, birds, and hamsters were all valuable as animal companions. The journal article is open access. Read more: “Ontological security and connectivity provided by pets: a study in the self-management o...
Source: Channel N - January 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: sandra at psychcentral.com (Sandra Kiume) Sandra Kiume Tags: All Documentary General Online education animals brain pets psychology support therapeutic video Source Type: blogs

Doctors have feelings too
As an intern, I once cared for an elderly gentleman who came in with heart failure. In no time, we grew fond of each other. It was almost like he looked forward to my visits. He sometimes called me “sunshine.” I am not sure if he meant it in a way that meant that I woke him up every morning.  He was almost ready to go back home when he admitted to one of the social workers who was trying to set up resources for him, that he was actively suicidal and elucidated an elaborate plan that involved guns and shooting himself. I was mortified when I heard about it. In a small way, I also felt a little betrayed that he did not ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 18, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/prarthna-bhardwaj" rel="tag" > Prarthna Bhardwaj, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Another Mass Murder Spurs Many Responses
Almost two weeks ago, it happened again:a man with a history of psychiatric symptoms opened fire and killed people in the Fort Lauderdale airport.  In our book,Committed, we have researched and written about mental illness and violence, guns, and specifically addressed the question of Can Forced Psychiatric Care Prevent Mass Murders?Pete Earley, on his blog, offers the idea that it would help to change the standard for involuntary care from "dangerous" to "a need for treatment."  You can read Pete's blog,Another Mass Murder With Plenty of Warning Signs: We Need to Address the Dangerous Criteria.But ClinkShrink do...
Source: Shrink Rap - January 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

I Miss Booze
I was never a big drinker; certainly, drinking was never a problem for me. I started drinking beer with my older brothers and hating it. It was not until I’d consumed it for a couple of years that I began to love it. We’d drink beer down by the river, standing around a huge bonfire, our fronts toasty and our backs cool in the fall air. I then moved into a tequila stage. I loved the mechanics, the drama of tequila — licking the salt, biting the lime and throwing back the shot. I drank shots with my first boyfriend, my childhood sweetheart. At Oberlin, I drank 3.2 beer because that’s all there was. I continued to...
Source: World of Psychology - January 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Addiction Antidepressant Bipolar Medications Personal Alcohol Abuse Alcoholism barbituates drinking overdose Psychotropic Medication sober Sobriety Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs

Disturbances in the salience network may be common mechanism for multiple psychiatric disorders
Yet more support for the importance of understanding brain networks. I have also suggested the importance of the interplay of the salience network, the default network and the central executive control network in myMindHub Pub 2white paper....in an attempt to explain the possible mechanisms of a neurotechnology that appears to make demands on attentional control. Report can be found here....http://www.themindhub.com/research-reports" Disturbances in the salience network may be a common etiology underlying many psychiatric disorders. "Read it on FlipboardRead it on twitter.com (Source: Intelligent Insights on Inte...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - January 14, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

The psychiatry rotation terrifies this medical student. Here ’s why.
Most third medical students look forward to their psychiatry block. After twelve plus hour days and six day weeks on internal medicine, OB/GYN and surgery, the reasonable hours on psychiatry seems like a dream. While my classmates viewed psychiatry as a break, I dreaded it. This was not my first time on an inpatient psychiatry ward. My world and fate forever changed when I was twelve years old. Sometimes depression is like standing on a trapdoor that opens suddenly, dropping the world out from under me. Sometimes it is like being stuck as ice cold water slowly drowns me inch by inch. I don’t remember a moment of my adole...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 14, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anonymous" rel="tag" > Anonymous < /a > Tags: Education Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 26-year-old man with depressed mood and poor concentration
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 26-year-old man is evaluated for a 3-month history of depressed mood, poor concentration, decreased energy, increased sleep, and weight gain. He reports missing many days at work and that his work performance has lagged. He has no suicidal ideation. He states that his current symptoms differ markedly from his usual state of being “highly upbeat and energetic” and having high job performance. He has experienced several 30- to 40-day periods of high energy during which he sleeps little and makes R...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 14, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Identification and Intimacy
To say that there is no fear in the examining room is an inaccuracy. I'm not only talking patients here. Physicians may harbor just as much worry and discontent . There are the old standbys of course. The swat team of malpractice attorneys lounging in the waiting room ready to pounce. Or the old demon of misdiagnosis and the consequences that may follow.Few of us talk of that sinking feeling that comes with the realization that in the course of doing our jobs, we invite physical danger. During medical school, I remember a psychiatric patient barricaded one of my peers in an interview room.&nbs...
Source: In My Humble Opinion - January 14, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Jordan Grumet Source Type: blogs

Video: Medical Conditions That Can Cause Psychiatric Symptoms
It seems like common sense that psychological problems require psychological solutions. If anxiety is interfering in your life, then surely the appropriate treatment is psychotherapy or anxiety medication, right? In reality, though, other medical conditions can sometimes masquerade as psychiatric conditions. Hyperthyroidism can cause anxiety, and vitamin B-12 deficiency can cause paranoia, to give only two examples. What that means is that when you’re being evaluated for symptoms that seem to have a psychological origin, it’s worth keeping in mind that a trip to your physician might be helpful. Any psychiatric symptoms...
Source: World of Psychology - January 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Neil Petersen Tags: Aging Anxiety and Panic Health-related Treatment Video Daniel Tomasulo Dementia Diagnosis Marie Hartwell-Walker Vitamin Deficiency Source Type: blogs

My brain: In sickness and in health
Chapter 1: Physiology “I am a brain, Watson. The rest of me is a mere appendix.” – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Bound by flesh and bone, therein lies a mystery of undefined potential which the cosmos cannot even parallel in mystery and in complexity beautiful and terrifying. It is that which allows movement to leave the study hall beneath the starry sky, professors to lull us to sonorous sweet slumber, to remember minute details which escape us at the moment of interrogation, and invoke compassion and bonding with patients. It is the brain that permits each and every movement, sensation, memory, emotion, consciousness,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 13, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/joan-choi" rel="tag" > Joan Choi < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV: Violating confidentialty, ethical decision-making, unapproved human experimentation
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Chicago Med (Season 2; Episode 10): In this episode a heart patient returns from a previous episode when a heart is found for a transplant. However, the patient who is 3 years sober had a couple of alcohol shots that morning upon learning that her friend had died. At a meeting of the transplant committee Dr. Latham—the cardiothoracic attending—says that the rules are clear, she must be sober for 18 months before a transplant. Dr. Charles—the psychiatrist—is conflicted, concerned that he misread the patient but also knowing, as he states, that often it takes a slip before a person with an add...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 13, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Organ Transplant & Donation Privacy #ChicagoMedNBC #PureGenius FDA Source Type: blogs

The one lesson I learned working in a psych unit
I was incredibly nervous going into my first day in the inpatient child/adolescent psychiatry unit. “Was this where the truly psychotic kids are? Am I going to be safe here?” I wondered as I casually introduced myself to the staff on the floor. After a morning of sitting in on group therapy led by psychologists and occupational therapists, I calmed down. Against the backdrop of the soothing soft pastel colors, I began to forget that I was in a hospital and not an outpatient clinic. I was expecting to see the stereotypical patient mumbling to them or trying to injure themselves in the dark corner of the hospital floor. ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 11, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anonymous" rel="tag" > Anonymous < /a > Tags: Education Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Is There A Higher Power That Participates In Our Lives? 27 Physicians Collaborate On A New Book Detailing Unexplained Medical Miracles
You're reading Is There A Higher Power That Participates In Our Lives? 27 Physicians Collaborate On A New Book Detailing Unexplained Medical Miracles, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. My name is Dr. Scott Kolbaba and I have been a physician in the Chicagoland area for over 35 years. The answer to whether there is a higher power that participates in our lives was not one I learned in medical school. Quite the opposite actually. In medical school we are taught to base our findings on science. X=Y and so for...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: skolbaba Tags: featured philosophy self improvement best self improvement blog incredible afterlife stories medical miracles myths pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Looking Ahead to APA in San Diego
This May, the American Psychiatric Association's Annual Meeting will be in San Diego.  I'm thinking ahead here, but people often make their travel plans in January, so I'd like to tell you about the talks we'll be involved in and invite you to come listen and participate. --------------------To search for sessions by topic or presenter, go to this link:http://s4.goeshow.com/apa/annual/2017/itinerary_planner.cfm Session ID: 3019 Symposium Outpatient Commitment: A Tour of the Practices Across States Date: Tuesday, May 23 Time: 8:00 AM –11:00 AM Speakers: Chair: Dinah Miller (Maryland) Presenter: Ryan C....
Source: Shrink Rap - January 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Who Looks After the President ’ s Mental Health?
Nearly 100 years ago, the U.S. appointed the first physician to look after the physical health of the president. As the president’s personal doctor, he or she looks after the president’s health and well-being and provides the American public with an annual report on his general health. With all that we’ve learned about the important and inseparable connection between physical and mental health, might it not be time for the president to also have a personal psychologist or psychiatrist? After all, who looks after the president’s mental health? That’s the question posed by Alex Thompson, writin...
Source: World of Psychology - January 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Psychology president president's health president's mental health presidential mental health Source Type: blogs

A New Development: Depression Mixed with Anxiety
Since I’ve been diagnosed with bipolar illness (1991), I’ve lived in lots of “states” — I’ve been high; I’ve been low; I’ve existed in a horrible mixed state of high (mania) and low (depression), in which the key emotions were anger and irritability. But recently, I experienced a new state–depression mixed with anxiety, and let me tell you, this might have been the most debilitating state of all. Usually, when I get depressed, I’m just sad, or when I’m really low, I feel a complete lack of emotion. But again, a few months ago, I experienced a new kind of de...
Source: World of Psychology - January 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Antidepressant Bipolar Depression Medications Personal Bipolar Disorder Cymbalta Lack Of Confidence Major Depressive Disorder Mania medication adjustment Resilience Sadness Suicide Source Type: blogs

December blogs digest: the health benefits of nuts, sequencing the Iberian lynx genome, the importance of pets and more
How can we measure health behavior theories mathematically? William Riley looks at whether Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) could be expressed mathematically. He reports on his article published in Translational Behavioral Medicine in which he and co-authors developed a dynamic computational model for SCT. Magnesium deficiency and its multiple health outcomes Getting enough magnesium in your diet? A study published in BMC Medicine last month found that increased dietary magnesium is associated with a reduced risk of heart failure, stroke, diabetes, and all-cause mortality. The study was the largest of its kind to date, using ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - January 6, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Davy Falkner Tags: Biology Health Medicine Open Access blogs digest Source Type: blogs

Muse, The Brain Sensing Headband: Updated Product Review
Conclusion When I first saw Muse at Pepcom’s Holiday Spectacular in SF, I was intrigued. This product successfully demonstrates a novel application of a well-developed technology. The product is well designed for intuitive use and is moderately priced. While I am no expert at meditation, I feel like the Muse is definitely worth trying out. And in comparison, other products that use similar EEG technology are often well beyond the price of this product. Product page: Muse headband… Flashbacks: New InteraXon Muse Consumer EEG Brain Wave Monitoring Device…; Interaxon’s Muse Measures Your Brainwaves To Impr...
Source: Medgadget - January 6, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Joshua Chen Tags: Exclusive Neurology OTC Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

True grit and genetics: Predicting academic achievement from personality.
2016 Nov;111(5):780-789. Epub 2016 Feb 11. 1MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, …Read it on FlipboardRead it on ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner))
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - January 6, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 171
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 171 Question 1 Which famous fictional character suffered from Erethism? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet171505326'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink171505326')) The Mad Hatter due to mercury exposure. Common symptoms include irritability, low self-confidence, depression, apathy, shyness, personality changes, memory loss and delirium. The connection between the Mad Hatte...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 6, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Bedlam Bethlem Royal Hospital Erethism FFFF Flemming insulin leonard thompson lewis carroll mad hatter mercury penicillin selfies The Fountains Abbey Source Type: blogs

Policy changes in the transgender health care arena
Transgenderism has been catapulted to the forefront in the media, and it is clear we are in the midst of a cultural shift towards greater acceptance of the transgender community. The January 2017 issue of National Geographic was recently released as a special issue entitled, “Gender Revolution,” featuring a nine-year old transgender girl on its cover. As the construct of fixed gender is challenged and the societal impact of this continues to evolve, the health care industry finds itself amidst controversies and changes as well, as a new transgender patient population arises. One reason for the controversy centers on th...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 5, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/erez-dayan" rel="tag" > Erez Dayan, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Neural Circuits Research: How and Why
Dr. Gordon talks about the potential pay-offs of research on neural circuits and next steps for going forward. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - January 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Joshua Gordon Source Type: blogs

Vocal Biomarkers: New Opportunities in Prevention
Vocal biomarkers have amazing potential in reforming diagnostics through their accuracy, speed and cost-effectiveness in the areas of mental illnesses as well as physical diseases such as Parkinson’s or coronary artery disease. Your voice betrays you, princess! The line has a long tradition in literature and cinematography. Its earliest presence might be in the Tales of One Thousand and One Nights by storyteller Scheherezade. In one of her stories her voice reveals a princess dressed in male cloths to a dervish; and he uses this exact line to tell her, he knows he is in fact female. It has been commonplace since ancient ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 4, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Biotechnology Future of Medicine AI artificial intelligence diagnostics gc3 Innovation sensors vocal biomarker Source Type: blogs

Cannabinoid Hyperemesis: How Rare?
I recently read a CBS news story about CHS, or Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome, describing a 100% increase in cases in Colorado since the legalization of marijuana there.  A search for ‘THC’ and ‘CHS’ pulls stories from a range of sources including High Times, Wikipedia, Fusion.net, and Current Psychiatry.  A broader search reveals articles calling the disorder ‘fake news‘. Most articles about CHS describe the condition as ‘rare’, but becoming less rare as the legalization movement takes root and grows (like a weed).  The syndrome occurs in heavy, long-time users of marij...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - January 4, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: Jeffrey Junig MD PhD Tags: Acute Pain Chronic pain pharmacology receptor actions abdominal pain and THC cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome CHS marijuana nausea and THC Source Type: blogs

Mistakes were made
I believe the full article is off-limits to you common riffraff, buthere at least is the abstract of a recent essay in JAMA about the consequences of the mass shuttering of psychiatric hospitals that happened in the 1990s. This happened for good and just reasons: mental hospitals were inhumane totalitarian institutions, it was generally believed that antipsychotic medications would enable people with serious mental illness to function more independently, and that people had a right to an environment that was the least restrictive and most integrated into the community that they could safely live in.You may recall that this...
Source: Stayin' Alive - January 4, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

We need a more humane approach to medical education
A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association concludes that 27 percent of medical students around the world exhibit symptoms of depression and 11 percent have thought of taking their own lives. Equally troubling is the fact that, among students experiencing depressive symptoms, only 16 percent seek psychiatric treatment. Other studies have suggested that the prevalence of depression in medical students may be as much as five times higher than among age-matched controls, and anxiety disorders are as much as eight times more common. Many do not seek professional help for fear the stigma of mental illness...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 4, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/richard-gunderman" rel="tag" > Richard Gunderman, MD, PhD < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Mathematical Analysis of Brush Strokes Spots Artists with Dementia
Salvador Dali: The Hallucinogenic Toreador Source: Wikipedia Artists often develop new creative techniques late in life, often at the same time as they begin suffering from dementia. Some scientists suspect that it is the dementia itself that fosters ways of expression that haven’t been tried by the artists before. At the University of Liverpool a team of researchers wanted to examine this connection further by performing fractal analysis of paintings of famous artists. Specifically, they were looking for evidence of cognitive decline within the brush strokes of art works completed before and after the onset of artis...
Source: Medgadget - January 3, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Exercise Can Improve the Quality of Life in People with Depression
This study appears online in the Psychiatry Research Journal. References: Schuch, F, B., Vancampfort, D., Rosenbaume, S., Richards, J., Warde, P, B., Stubbs, B. 2016. Exercise improves physical and psychological quality of life in people with depression: A meta-analysis including the evaluation of control group response. Psychiatry Research, 241, 47-54. The WHOQOL Group. 1995. The World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment (WHOQOL): position paper from the World Health Organization. Soc. Sci. Med. 41 (10), 1403–1409. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - January 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Joe Husbands Tags: Antidepressant Depression Medications Research Bipolar Disorder Dysthymia Major Depressive Disorder Mood Disorder Quality Of Life Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor SSRI Source Type: blogs

David Newman betrayed patients and emergency medicine
I remember that morning in January 2016 very well.  I opened up my twitter feed to find many people linking to an article that made me stop dead in my tracks.  The New York Post was reporting that Dr. David Newman had been accused of sexually assaulting a patient in his emergency department.  He was accused of giving the patient a dose of propofol and then sexually assaulting her. My initial reaction was denial and anger.  It wasn’t denial and anger that this happened but that it ever took place and that the media was reporting it before charges were filed.  I will admit my initial reaction was, “This must have be...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 31, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/steve-carroll" rel="tag" > Steve Carroll, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

We cannot afford to lose our physicians to suicide
In January, the National Academy of Medicine is launching a new committee to address the high rates of depression and suicide among physicians and other health care workers in the United States.  They plan to bring together medical professionals, educators and hospital administrators, and I hope they will also bring to the table professionals who have experienced burnout, and who may have attempted suicide due to burnout.  I say this because I am well aware of their pain, and I believe they can best shed light on helping to find the best solutions. I have the important job at my medical institution of working with others...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 29, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/joseph-p-merlino" rel="tag" > Joseph P. Merlino, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Study Confirms That “Sniff Test” May Be Useful in Diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease
Scientists are compiling increased evidence that the sense of smell declines sharply in the early stages of Alzheimer ’s.ByAlzheimer's Reading RoomI noticed early on that mother could not smell the food when I was cooking. You know that delicious odor of great cooking. As it turned out, she was shortly thereafter diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's disease.When I first read about the "smell test, I started putting things under my mother's nose - she really couldn't smell much of anything.Communicating in Alzheimer's WorldI started thinking at the time, wouldn't it be wonderful if there was a good "smell test" that baby b...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - December 28, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer care alzheimers research alzheimers treatment dementia care dementia help for caregivers family caregiving help alzheimer's help with dementia help with dementia care memory care Source Type: blogs

How this psychiatrist handles burnout
I listened to a Planet Money podcast recently titled, Burnout.  It dealt with the origin and characteristics of burnout, and I would highly recommend it. You’ve all heard the term and have a vague knowledge of what burnout is, I’m sure. You may have experienced it yourself. It affects call center employees (as in the podcast), all sorts of service workers, doctors and other health care providers and countless others. Looking back on it, I have experienced various degrees of burnout several times in my career in medicine. The symptoms I have fought with, sometimes silently, have included extreme fatigue, emotional wi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 28, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/greg-smith" rel="tag" > Greg Smith, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Borderline To-Do List
To my psychiatrist…who questioned my motives…and was right. I have had so many psychiatric hospitalizations. So. Many. It’s a hazard of being Borderline, and we both know it. What we DON’T know…is how to make it stop. Several weeks ago, you and I had a talk about how I act in the hospital. We talked about the behaviors that I consistently display on the unit, and why oh WHY it is that I keep doing these “crazy” things. I hurt myself. A lot. I break anything plastic…flatware, cup lids, used creamer cups, toothbrushes…and use it to dig scratches into my arms and legs. I ligature-strangle myself. I tie pants...
Source: World of Psychology - December 27, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Liz Briggs Tags: Anger Borderline Personality Inspiration & Hope Psychology Relationships Angry Outburst Boundaries Hospitalization manipulative Mental Health Pushing Buttons Self Harm Self Injury suicidal gestures Suicide violence Source Type: blogs

Suddenly, VC Guy Notices Mental Health Care
The quality and resources available to mental health care and treatment in the United States has been on the downswing since the 1980s. It started with the closing of government-run state psychiatric hospitals (putting our most at-need patients at risk, and often, on the streets), without the government offering a comprehensive network of community-based care to take their place. Then managed care — companies driven by profit and greed — came along and mid-level managers with no mental health background started dictating exactly what kind of mental health treatment was appropriate to which patients. Now we liv...
Source: World of Psychology - December 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior General Psychology Psychotherapy Technology Treatment Adam Seabrook mental health apps Mental Health Treatment mental illness treatment talkspace vc venture capital Source Type: blogs

Helping Doctors Get Help
Every year, roughly 400 doctors and medical students die from suicide.  To put this in perspective, there are roughly 100 medical students in a medical school class, and schooling takes four years: each year in the United States, we lose an entire school worth of doctors to suicide.  For some perspective: there are 141 medical schools and 31 osteopathic schools in the country; educating students takes time, money, and a tremendous amount of resources, and we have a doctor shortage.  Losing a school worth of physicians each year is an awful thing.  Furthermore, surveys have shown that roughly 30% of medi...
Source: Shrink Rap - December 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

What this physician learned from writing about psychiatry
Someone presented me with the opportunity to write a section on psychiatry for medical students. This is wonderful (an opportunity to influence future physicians!) and terrible (GAAAAH there’s so much in psychiatry!). Between thinking about psychiatry at multiple levels at work and thinking about the foundations of psychiatry while writing the section, I’ve felt cognitively impaired when thinking about what I should write here. But the thinking never stops … and here are some reflections I’ve had over the past two months while writing: The differences between what physicians and patients want. Many medical students...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 25, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/maria-yang" rel="tag" > Maria Yang, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Dec 23, Donald Lindsley: Today in the History of Psychology (23rd December 1907)
Donald B. Lindsley was born. Professor of psychology, physiology and psychiatry at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and founder member of the world renowned Brain Research Institute at UCLA, Lindsley was one of the most influential physiological psychologists of the 20th century. Best known for his revolutionary neuroscientific studies on the reticular activating system, Lindsley also conducted groundbreaking research on the human electroencephalogram (EEG). Donald Lindsley was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1952 and he received the American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguished Scientif...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - December 24, 2016 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Depression: The Beast We Have in Common
Learned Optimism Thought #1:I am grateful for beautiful daughters who made my 50th birthday a memorable one.If you can’t take medication to combat depression or suicidal depression, how do you cope? Do you resign yourself to desolation, or do you fight back? Can you fight back? How ‽ This was the dilemma I faced years ago when anti-depressants had failed me and my life was worse off because of side-effects. What I learned in my battle against depression not only changed my life for the better, but helped me change other lives, too. Fighting off depression seems like hard wor k, but when you break down the coping st...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - December 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD Depression Goodreads Source Type: blogs

These doctors were shamed and bullied for being sick
We go to the doctor when we are sick. But what happens when doctors get sick? Who cares for them? All too often, physicians are threatened, harassed, even terminated for being ill. After reporting on a psychiatrist fired for having cancer and a pediatrician bullied for her brain tumor, I’ve heard from many more physicians who are now courageously stepping forward to tell the truth — in their own words: Andrea Seiffertt, DO I got a migraine with aura on Newborn ICU (NICU) call. I literally couldn’t read the orders and had to call over my resident and tell her I had to lie down in the next 10 minutes before the pain ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Why doctors are rebelling against saving lives
When I was in medical school, “real” doctors saved lives. Period. Specialists who focused on a patient’s quality of life, (the plastic surgeons, bariatric surgeons, holistic practitioners, infertility experts, etc.) were considered sellouts. (We won’t even consider the med school status of future psychiatrists.) We disparaged these doctors because they could be saving lives and chose not to, because they were often paid (God forbid) out-of-pocket by their patients, and because they actively self-promoted themselves to the public (another doctor no-no). These “greedy” docs were scorned as entrepreneurs in a prof...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 23, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-breen" rel="tag" > Michael Breen, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Dec 22, Gail Wyatt: Today in the History of Psychology (22nd December 1944)
Gail Wyatt was born. Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Dr. Wyatt was the first African-American woman to be licensed as a psychologist in the state of California. A pioneering and influential researcher, Dr. Wyatt has testified on numerous occasions before the United States Congress in relation to health policy issues. In 1992, Gail Wyatt received the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contribution to Research in Public Policy, part of the official citation for which read: 'Her research significantly advanced our...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - December 23, 2016 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs