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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 2.

Dear Boston Globe Spotlight Team: Access to Care is About So Much More than Public Safety
The Boston Globe Spotlight Team -- the investigative reporting team featured in the Oscar-winning, best pictureSpotlight -- is doing a six-part series on the shambles the mental health system has become in Massachusetts.  And make no mistake, their system is a shambles.  The series is called The Desperate and the Dead, and while I understand that journalism involves sensationalism to get people to read, the emphasis on violence in these articles is striking, and unnecessarily provocative.  It's stigmatizing and distracts from the real issues.  This from an author who has abook coming out shortly about p...
Source: Shrink Rap - August 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Just Documentation
A quick update on my last post - I confronted Mark on his attitude last weekend the night after the concert, and he was not even aware of the attitude I explained, and right away, he apologized profusely. It was so immediate, I was not expecting that at all, I was expecting some sort of denial. I was really taken aback and did not know how to react or feel. I found myself initially still angry, but then thought...he apologized right away and seemed very sincere - what else could I expect from confronting him? So I kept to myself for a short while and my anger went away quickly.I am pretty lost as to wha...
Source: bipolar.and.me - August 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

What's up here and our CPN Posts
Oh, my -- it's been nearly a month and that is the longest I have ever gone without posting on Shrink Rap in 10+ years.  Just busy, to the point of being a little overwhelmed at moments.  And the nice part is that some of busy is time with family and time down the ocean, hon (as they say in B'More).  So lots of good busy, and lots of work busy, too.   I just submitted two abstracts to the APA --proposals for symposia for May's meeting in San Diego.  One is based on the subtitle of our forthcoming book: The Battle Over Involuntary Psychiatric Care and the other is called Outpatient Commitm...
Source: Shrink Rap - August 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

The Unmet Needs of Dementia Patients and Caregivers
This Johns Hopkins study found that 99 percent of people with dementia, and 97 percent of caregivers have unmet needs.Are you surprised?By Alzheimer's Reading RoomThe finding below should be read by Alzheimer's caregivers and their families.A disturbing finding of this study is that 60 percent of people with dementia needed medical care for conditions related or unrelated to their dementia.A big big problem considering that those with dementia are more likely to have other serious illnessesfor which they may eventually be hospitalized.Coping with DementiaOne aspect of this study that did not surprise me was the findin...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - August 25, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Dementia dementia care help alzheimer's help with dementia memory care facility nursing home Searches related to Alzheimer's Caregiver Source Type: blogs

Attitudinal Healing
Your attitudes support or detract from your experience when moving through life. Whether your attitude is expectant, positive, negative, neutral, simple, or complex, it drives you and shows up in your behavior. The best way to assess your position in life, your relationships, and your focus on life’s gifts or hindrances is to get to the root of your belief system, which in turn creates your attitudes. Chances are that you learned your life attitudes from those who raised you, your parents and caregivers. Other influential people who made a strong impact on your mind and experience also factor in. If these individuals ha...
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nina Sidell, MA Tags: Family Friends General Habits Happiness Motivation and Inspiration Personality Psychology Attitudes Interpersonal relationship Optimism Parenting Peace Pessimism Role Models Source Type: blogs

Falling Upward and Embracing the Second Half of Your Life
There comes a moment in every person’s life when she realizes she has just entered the second half of her life. With the average lifespan of a woman in the United States being 81, I technically crossed that line three years ago. Yes, that’s when my waist disappeared and the pregnancy questions started; my squiggly gray hair came in and I purchased my first pair of readers; I started doing things like placing ketchup in the freezer and cereal in the refrigerator; and the medical appointments on my calendar started to outnumber the social gatherings by a ratio of about 10 to 1. A month ago, I went through the rite of pas...
Source: World of Psychology - August 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Aging Depression Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Personal Bipolar Disorder Source Type: blogs

Exercise Helps Your Mental Health, Depression & Anxiety: Now What?
Your doctor or therapist has probably urged you at least once — get out and exercise more. It’s the kind of simplistic advice that professionals feel good about doling out, because it’s so easy to do. Exercise helps improve your mental health, and can help alleviate anxiety and depression symptoms. But as anyone who’s heard this advice knows, it’s so much easier to say than do. While exercise can help our mental health, it can be hard to put into action without motivation. And a person who is depressed or anxious may find motivation, well, lacking. The Antidepressant Effects of Exercise Decad...
Source: World of Psychology - August 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Anxiety and Panic Bipolar Depression Disorders General Happiness Health-related LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Benefits Of Exercise brain benefits Exercise and depression exercise for mental health exercise he Source Type: blogs

It is possible to find happiness again after major depression
By Christian Jarrett Living through depression can feel like being in an emotional prison, but there is a way out, at least for some. Writing in Psychiatry Research, Esme Fuller-Thomson and her colleagues describe their analysis of survey data from 20,000 Canadians, which showed that 2528 individuals had previously been diagnosed with major depression, and that two fifths of this group were now fully recovered, meaning that they’d been completely free of mental health problems for over one year and felt happy or satisfied with life on an almost daily basis in the preceding month. “Our findings provide a hope...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: researchdigestblog Tags: Mental health Source Type: blogs

Memory Care, A Good Place to Socialize
Socialization is a key component of excellent Alzheimer's care and effective dementia care.By Alzheimer's Reading RoomI wanted to bring this story to your attention because it highlights the importance and effectiveness of memory cafes; and, how they allow for both a person living with dementia and their caregiver to engage in much needed socialization.Several studies have shown that dementia often leads toisolation for both the person living with dementia and their caregiver.Feelings of isolation and loneliness often evolve into depression and greater anxiety.How to talk and communicate with dementia patientsAbout a third...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - August 23, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Communication Alzheimer's Dementia dementia care help alzheimer's help with dementia help with dementia care memory cafe Searches related to Alzheimer's Caregiver Source Type: blogs

Working On Myself, Try Number Two Million and Three
So...I over reacted to our marriage counselor. I was way more irritated that I should have been. Was I irritable to the point of being hypomanic? I am trying to answer that myself. I cannot exactly explain the situation to HER, and I do not want to tell my psychiatrist either. The last thing I want is some medication that will bring me DOWN to depression level when I am not depressed.#1 - There were a few days where I took an extra Adderall because I was freaked out about how much I had to do. #2 - When I increased the Trazadone, the out of this world heartburn caused major anxiety that nothin...
Source: bipolar.and.me - August 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

My Bipolar Care Plan: A 3-Legged Stool
I often find myself putting other people I meet who have bipolar disorder into two clearly different categories. Either they are like myself and they are manic, or they tend to have depression more of the time. For me, if I have depression, it is normally mixed in with feelings of regret of what has happened in the past. I try hard to not dwell on the past. As a person with mania, there are many things that I feel are different for me than for other people. For instance, I tend to have manic rage and manic anger. I have manic disappointment as well. The main thing to remember is when I use the word manic you could also u...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tosha Maaks Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Creativity Disorders Family General Personal Psychology Bipolar Disorder Depression (mood) family support Mania manic disappointment mental health recovery Mood Stabilizer Stigma Source Type: blogs

I Wasn ' t Up To Blogging
Yesterday I was not up to blogging. I meant to blog. But I didn ' t. I couldn ' t. I couldn ' t come up with anything to blog about because I was too tired to think.I haven ' t been sleeping well for the past week or so. I have been very tired and not able to nap for some reason. And every morning either I had to get up and go somewhere or I just woke up and couldn ' t fall back to sleep. Thursday afternoon I was so exhausted. I wanted to nap but couldn ' t. I also had to take the (EK) to the vet. I just wanted to sleep. Thursday night even thought exhausted I didn ' t sleep well.Yesterday morning I also had to go to an ap...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - August 20, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: depression disability lack of sleep nap Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 20, 2016
A few weeks ago, my beau and I decided to tackle a huge home improvement project together. According to Amy Kipp, a couples and family therapist in San Antonio, “Working through the ups and downs of a big project helps you hone your communication skills […] The sense of accomplishment and teamwork that results from a challenging shared experience strengthens a couple’s bond. (Her quote is featured in 7 Relationship Milestones That Are Just as Meaningful as Marriage.) Thus, it seems working on this project is a way to strengthen our relationship. This project is not an improvement our home needs (i.e. we̵...
Source: World of Psychology - August 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Disorders Happiness Health-related Marriage and Divorce Men's Issues Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Schizophrenia Trauma Video Source Type: blogs

EVA Park Virtual World Helps Stroke Patients Regain Speaking Skills
City University London researchers have developed a game-like virtual world for people with post-stroke speech impediments to practice their communication skills. Called EVA Park, the virtual world resembles Second Life, but is focused on getting the player to communicate with characters about mundane everyday things. To keep players engaged, the conversations and situations have quirky aspects that make them fun while really sticking to the kinds of basic conversations a typical person may find themselves. EVA Park has places like a bar, where you can practice ordering a warm pint of English beer, and a hair salon, wh...
Source: Medgadget - August 19, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

The physician role in the time of Black Lives Matter
In July, I found myself needing to step away from social media and news coverage of the recent shootings in Louisiana, Minnesota, and Dallas. Being a psychiatrist has made me sensitive to the toll of pain and anguish that life may bring, even as a bystander. This occurs even more so when I can all too easily imagine myself as a victim of one of these unfortunate events. In the aftermath of the Trayvon Martin shooting in 2013, #BlackLivesMatter was born. Moving from a hashtag to a full movement, the call for action has reached national recognition. But what about health care? Black lives matter in the health care system as ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 19, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/courtney-mcmickens" rel="tag" > Courtney McMickens, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Ode to the Duke
I saw my shrink today. I call him “The Duke.” We had a perfectly fine half-hour meeting. He wrote me some scripts and listened to my current take on my life. Mainly, we talked about my son Tommy’s fear of entering sixth grade. The Duke warned me that the junior high years are awful and to brace myself. The Duke is a straight shooter. At the end of the appointment, I asked him how he thought I was doing. “Fine,” he said. “You’re doing fine.” “I think I’ve licked bipolar illness,” I said. “Don’t say that,” he replied quickly. Perhaps he was worried that I wasn’t taking my illness seriously en...
Source: World of Psychology - August 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Bipolar Caregivers Disorders General Personal Psychiatry Treatment Bipolar Disorder Love Medicine Patient Sigmund Freud St. Dymphna Source Type: blogs

Using our Sports Culture to Ignite Mental Health Discussion
It’s a strange dichotomy. Endless chatter about sporting minutiae is common, while serious discussion on mental illness remains rare. But inject sports into the mental health conversation, and you find a plethora of Outside the Lines reports, peer-reviewed studies on sport-induced chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and arguments about the respective mental fortitude of Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo. Even when we talk about mental illness in art, as in the Oscar-nominated movie “Silver Linings Playbook,” the main characters are Philadelphia Eagles fans. Indeed, it seems mental health only interests our soc...
Source: World of Psychology - August 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Andrew D'Anieri Tags: Creativity Disorders General Motivation and Inspiration Policy and Advocacy Psychology Research Sports Students Doc Wayne Youth Services Health Care Health Services Mental Disorder Mental Health Olympics Psychiatry Sports P Source Type: blogs

What Memories Look Like: Researchers Imprint, Recall Groups of Coupled Neurons
Columbia University researchers have done something quite amazing with groups of neurons, but just how amazing is yet to be understood. Specifically, the investigators were able to stimulate a connected set of neurons in a living mouse to learn to fire together, and then when even one of the set’s neurons was fired later, even up to a day later, the whole ensemble of neurons again flashed as one. This seems to prove a long held hypothesis, originally conceived by psychologist Donald Hebb, that groups of neurons activated together form the core mechanism of how we learn and memorize things. The feat was achieved us...
Source: Medgadget - August 18, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Neurology News Source Type: blogs

The American Medical Association Goes Wobbly on Physician-Assisted Suicide
By RONALD PIES, MD Physician-assisted suicide. Physician-assisted dying. Physician Aid in Dying. All these terms have been used to describe a terminally ill patient’s use of a lethal, prescribed medication. Sometimes the medication is used to end the patient’s life; sometimes, it is held “in reserve” to provide a sense of control over the timing of death. Historically, the American Medical Association has stood squarely against physician-assisted suicide (PAS). But recently, in approving “Resolution 015”, the organization has resolved to study the issue of “aid in dying”, with an eye toward reconsidering th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Video: What ’ s in a Label? Pros and Cons of the DSM
A recent proposal to remove transgender identity from the ICD, the World Health Organization’s manual of medical conditions, has reignited the debate over what should and shouldn’t be a mental health diagnosis. Many feel that classifying transgender identity as a disorder is unnecessarily stigmatizing. Others argue that leaving it as a recognized medical diagnosis has practical benefits. For example, as a New York Times article on the controversy points out, classifying transgender identity as a disorder has allowed inmates like Chelsea Manning to undergo hormone therapy. Transgender identity aside, there’...
Source: World of Psychology - August 17, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Neil Petersen Tags: Disorders History of Psychology Psychiatry Video Daniel J. Tomasulo Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders Dsm Dsm 5 icd Marie Hartwell-Walker Mental Health Source Type: blogs

As Research Advances, Treatment for Depression Keeps Getting Better
Have you ever felt like you were at the bottom of a deep hole with no way out? One of the most characteristic effects of depression, a mental health condition that affects some 22% of Americans, is a feeling of exhausted sadness towards the present and hopelessness that things can or will ever get better. Given our advancements in the fields of psychology and neuroscience, this condition has never been so treatable; so why does it continue to affect so many? Incredible stigma exists around almost all mental health conditions, and depression is no different. Over centuries a diverse group of thinkers from economists to sci...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - August 17, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: sheilas Tags: Richard Taite Source Type: blogs

One Example Of Improving Telehealth Documentation  
Over the past year or two, the pressure has risen for providers to better document telehealth encounters, a pressure which has only mounted as the volume of such consults has grown. But until recently, telemedicine notes have been of little value, as they’ve met few of the key criteria that standard notes must meet. The fact that such consults aren’t integrated with EMRs has made such an evolution even trickier. I guess doctors might be able to squeeze the patient’s video screen into one corner, allowing the clinician to work within the existing EMR display, but that would make both the consult and the note-taking r...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - August 16, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: Anne Zieger Tags: Digital Health EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR Healthcare HealthCare IT ICD-10 mHealth Population Health Management Telemedicine American Well Doctor on Demand HealthTap Telehealth United Healthcare Source Type: blogs

Psychologists who “Analyze” Trump are Violating the Public Trust
As the 2016 presidential election approaches, psychologists are gaining media attention by diagnosing candidates as having personality disorders, especially for the Republican nominee.  But the public should question whether or not offering these diagnoses is professionally ethical or in the service of … Continue reading → (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 16, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care American Psychiatric Association American Psychological Association APA Celia B. Fisher Contemporary Ethical Issues Decoding the Ethics Code diagnosis Donald Trump Fordham University In the News New York Times psycholog Source Type: blogs

Science Explains How We Choose Political Leaders
This study indicates the far-reaching influence of first impressions. Political leaders with an eye on power and position may want to take note of the findings of another study. People who have suffered damage to the OFC region of their brains tend to be morally harsher and more inflexible than healthy people. The people with damaged OFC regions tend to exhibit “hypermoral” tendencies. These people punish offenders more harshly than those with healthy OFC regions for crimes committed under similar circumstances and with identical degrees of severity. So political leaders, you know what to do; make sure that you have an...
Source: World of Psychology - August 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain and Behavior Brain Blogger Publishers Research Attractiveness candidates Decision Making economic election Emotional Stability First Impressions functional neuroimaging lateral orbitofrontal cortex LOFC Openness Persona Source Type: blogs

Hospital fires doctor for having cancer
Dear Pamela, You’ll never guess what happened to me today. Hours after the National Day of Solidarity to Prevent Physician Suicide volunteer web page went live, I received an email stating that I am officially terminated from my psychiatry residency program. On this web page, I spoke about the fact that I had become interested in this event during my struggle to get the medical care I needed throughout my residency for my cancer diagnosis. I heard that people from my department were reading it today. Some stated I was very brave, others, well, others do not appreciate such outspokenness. I was even told by some not to p...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 15th 2016
In conclusion, our results demonstrate that circulating GDF11 levels are reduced in our mouse model of premature aging, which shares most of the symptoms that occur in normal aging. However, GDF11 protein administration is not sufficient to extend longevity in these progeroid mice. Although accelerated-aging mouse models can serve as powerful tools to test and develop anti-aging therapies common to both physiological and pathological aging, the existence of certain differences between the two processes implies that further investigation is still required to determine whether long-term GDF11 administration has a pro-surviva...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 14, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Exciting implications of the neuro-immune link no one is talking about
A recent research paper from the University of Virginia may pound the final nail into the coffin of the long-standing medical dogma which rigidly labels diseases as “organic” or “psychiatric.”  UVA researchers have discovered a complex network of lymphatic vessels which service the brain, prompting a serious update of the concept of a highly selective “blood-brain barrier.” When asked about methods to study the immune response of the brain and CNS, UVA Department of Neuroscience Professor Jonathan Kipinis explained, “Now we can approach this mechanistically – because the brain is like ever...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 13, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/keith-pochick" rel="tag" > Keith Pochick, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

I Thought I Could - But Couldn ' t
I woke up this morning determined to go with my husband to our marriage counseling appointment. I have been ranting and raving about her since our appointment a week ago. After that appointment, I thought I would get over it and just forget it, but I have not. My frustration and irritation - or is it flat out anger? has only worsened day by day.I had made a plan. Before the appointment, no Adderall, no coffee, and klonipin. Zone out the best I could (the medication wouldn ' t do that, but I have had many occasions in the past to get plenty of practice) unless asked a direct question, whic...
Source: bipolar.and.me - August 13, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 13, 2016
The world is deep in the throes of the 2016 Summer Olympics, and while such competition has to bring a certain level of anxiety and stress to athletes, sports can help to improve both your body and your mind. Of course, Olympic athletes face much more pressure than those of us who dabble in the occasional friendly tennis match, which is where professionals such as sports psychologists can help. Learn more about these mental health experts, as well as the latest on the mental health benefits of those who volunteer, how you can make performance anxiety work for you, a new non-medical approach to mental health care that̵...
Source: World of Psychology - August 13, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Aging Anxiety and Panic Disorders Medications Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Spirituality Sports Chris LuVogt Dr. Faiza Tabassum holistic recovery imposter synd Source Type: blogs

A Journalist Once Again Fails to Mention SENS and Rejuvenation when Writing About the State of Longevity Science
The article on longevity science that I'll point out today continues a frustrating recent trend of failing to note one of the most important portions of the aging research field: SENS rejuvenation research. This is a puzzling omission, especially now that senescent cell clearance as a rejuvenation therapy is proven and heading for the clinic - a goal that SENS supporters have been advocating for fifteen years or so. For most journalists, there is no way to quickly and easily distinguish between any of the possible approaches to intervene in the aging process and thus extend healthy life. Being journalists, they are in the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 12, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Poison Pills? When Meds Strike Back
This narrative details my personal experience with medications. Medications impact each person differently; please consult with your psychiatrist if side effects persist. The medication bottle gravely intones, “May cause drowsiness, use care operating a vehicle, vessel, or dangerous machinery.” If only. Over 15 years ago, a well-meaning nurse at UNC-Chapel Hill prescribed an antidepressant. “It will make you feel better,” she soothed. Capitulating to her, I begrudgingly placed the tiny capsule under my tongue. I was your typical Carolina student: studious, fun-loving, and a little neurotic (partially about Carolin...
Source: World of Psychology - August 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Matthew Loeb Tags: Disorders General Health-related Medications OCD Personal Psychology Treatment Emotion Feeling Medicine Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Pharmaceutical drug Pharmacology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Therapist Is Incredibly Insulting and Annoying
First off, I must address my medication issue. My Zonegran was increased which is *awesome* for my anxiety, but I developed the most AWFUL heartburn. I hurt so incredibly bad and I stopped so many things trying to figure out what it was. Because I was already taking Zonegran and I had been on the same dosage in the past, I did not consider it was that for weeks. I knew that was when it started, but even knowing that, it still did not occur to me. I told my doctor and she changed when I take each pill but I cannot fathom following that schedule right now. How can I not have an aversion to the s...
Source: bipolar.and.me - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Why It ’s Important to Be Positive About Mental Illness
I love hope-filled stories of recovery from mental illness. Living with bipolar disorder has led to many instances of triumph over my circumstances and I often write about them. As anyone who lives with or knows someone with mental illness is aware, it’s a horrible disease. Do Positive Experiences Glorify Mental Illness? As a writer and speaker about my experience with bipolar and anxiety disorders, I’m often accused of glorifying mental illness, and of not telling the full story or giving the public a complete picture. Many people — and national mental illness advocacy organizations — believe that the only...
Source: World of Psychology - August 10, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Anxiety and Panic Bipolar Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Personal Policy and Advocacy Anxiety Disorder Bipolar Disorder Disability Gabe Howard Hopelessness Mental Health Advocacy Mental Health Advocate Mental Healt Source Type: blogs

Why We Trade
Imagine life in isolation, waking every morning before sunrise to make your own clothes, build and repair your meager shelter, hunt and harvest your own food, concoct rudimentary salves for what physically ails you, and attend to the upkeep of your brutish existence engaging in other difficult and tedious tasks. Forget leisure or luxuries; all of your time would be consumed trying to produce basic necessities merely to subsist.Fortunately, that ’s no longer the way most of humanity organizes its economic activities. We don’t attempt to make everything we need or want to consume, but instead specialize in a few, or a co...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 10, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Daniel J. Ikenson Source Type: blogs

10 Ways to Cultivate Good Gut Bacteria and Reduce Depression
In this study published in the journal Neuroscience, the performance of mice on various tests of mental and physical function began to drop just four weeks after being fed a diet high in fat and sugar. Monosaccharides, the simplest carbohydrates containing a single molecule of glucose and fructose (a piece of Wonder bread), disrupt a healthy microbial balance because they are digested very easily by us and absorbed into our small intestine without any help from our microbes. That leaves our gut bugs hungry, with nothing to munch on, so they begin nibbling on the mucus lining of our intestines, which is meant to be a stro...
Source: World of Psychology - August 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Books Depression Mental Health and Wellness Personal Research Alcohol Caffeine Diet gut bacteria Gut flora Lactobacillus leaky gut Monosaccharides Probiotic sugar Source Type: blogs

Early Warning Signs Your Relationship Is Making You Depressed
Everyone dreams of meeting their soul mate. Our brains actually encourage us to fall in love when we meet someone who we connect with by increasing the production of the hormone oxytocin, also known as the love hormone. Oxytocin production increases early on in a relationship and enhances the feelings associated with finding new love.    Eventually the relationship evolves, the honeymoon phase passes and each person’s true personality begins to surface. It’s normal for minor disagreements to turn into major agreements, however, it’s not normal for intense arguing to become a daily occurrence. Men and w...
Source: World of Psychology - August 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Anjail Ameen-Rice, LCSW Tags: General Marriage and Divorce Men's Issues Motivation and Inspiration Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Women's Issues Dating Defence mechanism Depression Domestic Violence Heartache Major Depressive Disorder Source Type: blogs

Good Qualities of Adult Children of Mentally Ill Mothers
There isn’t really a huge trumpet blowing for the qualities that blossom in the children of mentally ill mothers. Not even much of a toot. But there’s a whole orchestra booming about the downsides: the lack of self-esteem, difficulty forming relationships, trusting people, or most uplifting of all: the inevitability of developing your very own mental illness. Just for once, let’s not go to that particular concert. Because maybe, if you’re the child of a mentally ill mother, you also have the capacity for things like this: A Broad and Nonjudgmental Mind I know you have a broad mind because a narrow mind simply can...
Source: World of Psychology - August 7, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Caroline Freeman-Cuerden Tags: Caregivers Disorders Family General Inspiration & Hope Personal Psychology Relationships Mental Disorder Mental Illness Mother Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Care Resource Centers are a Useful Tool for Alzheimer's Caregivers
The Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers around the country are an important source of information and help for Alzheimer's caregivers and family caregivers.Alzheimer's Reading RoomI often receive emails from readers asking me how to find someone that is experienced in the diagnosis of dementia, or searching for help on other Alzheimer's care related problems. When this happens, the first thing I do is ask them their location.Alzheimer's CareThere are about 30 Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers (ADRC) around the country. When most people think ADRC they think research.However, most ADRCs have doctors in practice, practic...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - August 7, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: ADRC alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers family caregiving help alzheimer's help with dementia help with dementia care memory care Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: August 6, 2016
Happy Saturday, readers! Aside from a couple of friendly outings, I’ve spent the last several days by myself at home because my beau is out of town for work. (I work from home, so I’m not sequestering myself away or anything.) Do I miss him? Sure. Am I wallowing in loneliness? Nope. According to Sherrie Bourg Carter Psy.D., there are several benefits of solitude, and more than a few of them resonate with me. This alone time has allowed me to take a break from constantly being “on,” increased my productivity, and think a bit more deeply about some personal issues (currently, the root of my persisten...
Source: World of Psychology - August 6, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Brain and Behavior Celebrities Depression Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Money and Financial Psychology Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Brain Scans bullying Cara Delevingne Cognitive Biases Crimes Crimi Source Type: blogs

Insurance constraints drive shortcomings in health care delivery
It is no secret that mental health conditions are prevalent, and recent years have seen an increase in the dialogue on their causes and consequences. However, we do ourselves a disservice when discussing mental health outside the context of the broader system in which care is provided, and the insurance constraints that drive shortcomings in health care delivery. SAMHSA estimated that 58 percent of adults have a medical condition and that 25 percent of adults have a mental health condition. At least as important is the rate of comorbidity that they estimate: 29 percent of those with medical conditions have mental health c...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 6, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/miranda-yaver" rel="tag" > Miranda Yaver, PhD < /a > Tags: Policy Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trump: Enemy of Those With Mental Illness?
As the United States enters its election season full-swing, it’s time to look at the candidates’ positions on mental healthcare in America. First up is Donald Trump, the Republican nominee for president. Throughout the campaign, Trump has said very little about mental illness and what he would do to help change the conversation of mental health in America. But what he has said speaks volumes. What Trump Proposes Through His Policy Statements More than one in five Americans suffers from a mental illness, most of it undiagnosed and untreated. Out of those 1 in 5, less than 20 percent seek out and receive treatm...
Source: World of Psychology - August 5, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Policy and Advocacy Psychology Treatment affordable care act Donald Trump mental health reform mental illness policy obamacare trump and mental illness trump and mentally ill Trump's policies Source Type: blogs

Against North Carolina ’s HB2 Law: Mental Health And Discrimination Cannot Co-Exist
This past May, the board of directors of Grantmakers in Health (GIH) decided to relocate the organization’s 2017 Annual Conference on Health Philanthropy from Charlotte, North Carolina, to another city. This difficult decision was made in light of the state of North Carolina’s controversial new law, the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act (HB2). The law overturned a Charlotte ordinance that extended rights to gay and transgender people. In doing so, the state effectively sanctioned discrimination against a class of its citizens. I am a member of the GIH board. Not only am I proud of GIH’s decision, but as exec...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 4, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Octavio N. Martinez, Jr. Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured GrantWatch Children Health Philanthropy LGBT issues Mental Health Politics States transgender discrimination Source Type: blogs

How You Might Be Unwittingly Relinquishing Your Power —and How to Get It Back
She’s driving me crazy! He doesn’t want to improve our relationship, so there’s nothing I can do. I have to work late. Yet again. I’m not smart. I’m not capable of accomplishing this. I don’t have time for what I really want to do. If only things were different. Why does this keep happening to me??? These are just some of the ways we relinquish our power—to others, to circumstances, to conditions. As psychotherapist Eli Feldman, LMHC, said, “there are a million ways we take power away from ourselves.” We think that people do things to us. We assume that we have zero control, whether it’s at work or with...
Source: World of Psychology - August 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Auschwitz concentration camp be proactive being reactive Choice Control Decision Making empowering yourself freedom to choose pe Source Type: blogs

Depression and Men: Why It ’ s Hard to Ask for Help
Fans surprised Supernatural star Jared Padalecki at Comic-Con on Sunday, July 12, by lighting candles in the audience — over 7,000 of them — as a thank you for opening up about his struggles with depression and as a tribute to his Always Keep Fighting campaign that supports people struggling with depression, self-injury, addiction, or suicidal thoughts. You can see Padalecki’s Tweet here: View from stage. #ComicCon pic.twitter.com/aIy04Cf6ak — Jared Padalecki (@jarpad) July 12, 2015 During filming of the third season of Supernatural, Padalecki broke down in his trailer after shooting an episode. A...
Source: World of Psychology - August 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Men's Issues Jared Padalecki Major Depressive Disorder Mental Health Support Mood Disorder Seasonal Affective Disorder Stigma Suicide Source Type: blogs

A lot of “Voice Hearing” isn’t an auditory experience at all
The message from recent surveys is that it’s not just people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who hear voices in their heads, many people considered mentally well do to. This revelation may have a welcome de-stigmatising effect in terms of how people think about some of the symptoms associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, but a new study published in Psychosis asks us to hang on a minute – to say that one “hears voices” can mean different things to different people. You might assume that “hears voices” means that a person has an hallucinated auditory experience just like someone i...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: researchdigestblog Tags: Mental health Psychosis Source Type: blogs

A lot of "voice hearing" isn't an auditory experience at all
The message from recent surveys is that it's not just people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who hear voices in their heads,many people considered mentally well do to. This revelation may have a welcome de-stigmatising effect in terms of how people think about some of the symptoms associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, buta new study published inPsychosis asks us to hang on a minute – to say that one "hears voices" can mean different things to different people. You might assume that "hears voices" means that a person has an hallucinated auditory experience just like someone is talking to them. But what about hea...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Research Digest Source Type: blogs

Depression in Seniors: What You Need to Know
Depression often goes overlooked, under-diagnosed and untreated in adults 65 years old and older. Symptoms tend to get dismissed as a standard part of aging. But they’re anything but. Depression is a serious illness that disrupts lives and increases the risk for suicide. Thankfully, however, it is treatable. Very treatable. In her excellent, eye-opening book Depression in Later Life: An Essential Guide psychologist Deborah Serani, Psy.D, sheds light on this prevalent disorder. She shares a slew of vital facts, research and case studies about what depression looks like in seniors and what helps to treat it. Below are five...
Source: World of Psychology - August 3, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Books Depression Disorders Family Friends General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress anxiety Chronic Illness Deborah Serani Elderly Helplessness Hopelessness late-life suicide later life depression Source Type: blogs

Brain scan study finds links between adolescent brain development and mental health disorders
— “Brain hubs”, courtesy of University of Cambridge Scans reveal how teenage brain develops (BBC News): “The team from Cambridge’s department of psychiatry scanned the brains of 300 people between the ages of 14 and 24. While the areas associated with the basic functioning of the body such as vision, hearing and movement are fully developed by adolescence, the areas associated with complex thought and decision making are still changing… You can think of the brain as a global airline network that’s made up of small infrequently used airports and huge hubs like Heathrow where there is very high traffic…The r...
Source: SharpBrains - August 3, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness adolescence brain brain-function mental-illness psychiatry teenage teenage-brain Source Type: blogs

Extinguishing Medical Errors with Oil and Gas
Unfortunately for patients and healthcare workers alike, medical errors happen. No matter how well-trained and experienced the practitioner, underneath the scrubs there still resides a human and errors will follow. However, systems can be put in place to minimise them and medicine could do well to learn lessons from other industries. In 2012, there were 107 serious medical errors in Australian hospitals. These ranged from surgery performed on the wrong patient or body part, to surgery where instruments were left inside the patient, to medication errors and in-hospital suicides 1. When considered in the context of the 53 mi...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 3, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tane Eunson Tags: Administration Medical Errors atul gawande O&G oil and gas industry Source Type: blogs