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A cycles-breaking framework to disrupt intergenerational patterns of maltreatment and vulnerability during the childbearing year - Sperlich M, Seng J, Rowe H, Fisher J, Cutherbert C, Taylor J.
We propose a cycles-breaking conceptual framework to guide perinatal research, interventions, and clinical innovations that can prevent or disrupt intergenerational cycles of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric vulnerability. The framework is grounded i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Sepsis risk prediction model 'cuts antibiotic use in newborns'
A neonatal sepsis risk calculator developed in the US has safely reduced antibiotic use by nearly 50% in newborns, according to researchers. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 21, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

New sepsis risk model reduces antibiotic use in newborns
Amy WallaceFeb. 20 (UPI) -- Researchers at Kaiser Permanente have reduced the use of antibiotics in newborns by nearly 50 percent with the development of neonatal sepsis risk calculator. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Florida Hospital for Women to expand
As Florida Hospital for Women celebrates its first anniversary, plans are underway to expand the facility with a new neonatal intensive care unit and surgical suite, both slated to open this spring. The neonatal intensive care unit will occupy two floors and will build upon the services already provided in the NICU floors at the adjacent Florida Hospital for Children, bringing the hospital’s NICU bed total to 102, according to a release from the hospital. “Since its conception, we have w anted… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 20, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Cindy Barth Source Type: news

Florida Hospital for Women to expand
As Florida Hospital for Women celebrates its first anniversary, plans are underway to expand the facility with a new neonatal intensive care unit and surgical suite, both slated to open this spring. The neonatal intensive care unit will occupy two floors and will build upon the services already provided in the NICU floors at the adjacent Florida Hospital for Children, bringing the hospital’s NICU bed total to 102, according to a release from the hospital. “Since its conception, we have w anted… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Cindy Barth Source Type: news

Sepsis risk prediction model decreases use of antibiotics in newborns
(Kaiser Permanente) Kaiser Permanente, the largest integrated health system in the nation, led the development of a neonatal sepsis risk calculator that has safely reduced antibiotic use by nearly 50 percent in newborns, according to research published today in JAMA Pediatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What Causes Hyperammonemia?
Discussion Reye’s syndrome (RS)is named for Dr. Douglas Reye who along with Drs. G. Morgan and J. Baral described encephalopathy and fatty accumulation and degeneration in children in a 1963 Lancet article. RS usually affects children but can occur at all ages. All organs can be affected but the liver and brain are primarily affected causing liver failure and encephalopathy as toxic metabolites (especially ammonia) accumulate, and intracranial hypertension and cerebral edema occurs. As the ammonia levels begin to rise (> 100 mg/dL) patients lose their appetite, have nausea and emesis and mental status changes whic...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Air Pollution Linked To Millions Of Premature Births Around The Globe
This study highlights that air pollution may not just harm people who are breathing the air directly ― it may also seriously affect a baby in its mother’s womb,” Dr. Chris Malley, a researcher at the University of York and the study’s lead author, said in a statement. “Preterm births associated with this exposure not only contribute to infant mortality, but can have life-long health effects in survivors.” For the study, researchers from Sweden, the U.S. and the U.K. looked at data on air pollution levels in different countries, analyzing PM levels by region. Then, they compared PM level...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Air Pollution Linked To Millions Of Premature Births Around The Globe
This study highlights that air pollution may not just harm people who are breathing the air directly ― it may also seriously affect a baby in its mother’s womb,” Dr. Chris Malley, a researcher at the University of York and the study’s lead author, said in a statement. “Preterm births associated with this exposure not only contribute to infant mortality, but can have life-long health effects in survivors.” For the study, researchers from Sweden, the U.S. and the U.K. looked at data on air pollution levels in different countries, analyzing PM levels by region. Then, they compared PM level...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Insulin Use Tied to Gestational Diabetes Risks: French Cohort Insulin Use Tied to Gestational Diabetes Risks: French Cohort
Risks, including neonatal respiratory distress and cardiac malformations, were only moderately raised, said researchers who also weighed in on the best delivery time to minimize stillbirth.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines)
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - February 17, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Study offers encouraging news for "extreme preemies"
Babies born at 22 and 24 weeks still face tough odds, but neonatal care improvements have been key, doctors say (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Worth every mile: Short bowel syndrome brings family to Boston
During his most recent visit to Boston Children’s Hospital, 3-year-old Konrad Schienke resembles a tiny tornado, gleefully scampering around the room as he mugged for the camera and shouted, “Cheese!” Later, he smiles as a doctor gently felt his abdomen, giggling as if he was being tickled. “It’s hard to believe what a sick little kid he has been,” says his father, Erich. Yet, just a few years ago, this energetic boy resided in the neonatal intensive care unit at his local hospital in Pennsylvania, struggling with a diagnosis of short bowel syndrome. This rare but serious condition can occur when a child eith...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Mark Puder short bowel syndrome (SBS). Source Type: news

Large Study IDs Fetal Risks from Gestational Diabetes (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- With 800,000 deliveries examined, perinatal death shown to rise (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - February 16, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Outlook for extremely premature babies 'improving'
Greater use of steroids in mothers-to-be and a focus on preventing infection are being credited. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

RCGP makes perinatal mental health a clinical priority
The Royal College of GPs has responded to new NICE guidelines on supporting new mothers with mental health problems. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - February 16, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

More 'Extreme Preemies' Are Surviving
Babies born at 22 and 24 weeks still face tough odds, but neonatal care improvements have been key, doctors say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Survival rates for extremely preterm babies improving in U.S.
(Reuters Health) - The first decade of the 2000s saw a small but significant increase in the survival of extremely premature infants without early neurodevelopmental problems, according to a study of nearly 4,500 babies born at 11 U.S. medical centers. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

More ' Extreme Preemies ' Are Surviving
Babies born at 22 and 24 weeks still face tough odds, but neonatal care improvements have been key, doctors saySource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Premature Babies (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mom Of Preemie Makes Special Milestone Cards To Celebrate Small Moments
After giving birth to a premature baby, an Australian mom developed a special way to bring hope to other parents with infants in the NICU. Amy Purling is the creator of Miracle Mumma ― a blog and online store offering products for parents of preemies. One of her biggest sellers is her series of milestone cards to track every step in a preemie’s journey and celebrate their progress. The milestones range from first snuggles to first weight gain to first day without wires. Purling told The Huffington Post the project was inspired by her son, James, who was born just 30 weeks into her pregnancy and spent the firs...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More ' Extreme Preemies ' Are Surviving
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 -- Babies born very early -- between 22 and 24 weeks of pregnancy -- are more likely to survive now than a decade or so ago, new research shows. These extremely premature infants are also slightly more likely to avoid... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 15, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Local Tobacco Control Profiles for England
These provide a snapshot of the extent of tobacco use, tobacco related harm, and measures being taken to reduce this harm at a local level. These profiles have been designed to help local government and health services to assess the effect of tobacco use on their local populations. They will inform commissioning and planning decisions to tackle tobacco use and improve the health of local communities. The tool allows you to compare your local authority against other local authorities in the region and benchmark your local authority against the England or regional average. New data points have been added for the smoking prev...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

North Africa: Malawi Commits to Halve Maternal and Neonatal Deaths Over Next Five Years
[] Lilongwe -Malawi has joined eight other African countries in Africa and South East Asia to make a commitment to reduce by half maternal and new-born death as well as still-born births in the next five years. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - February 15, 2017 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Consensus bundle on maternal mental health: perinatal depression and anxiety - Kendig S, Keats JP, Hoffman MC, Kay LB, Miller ES, Moore Simas TA, Frieder A, Hackley B, Indman P, Raines C, Semenuk K, Wisner KL, Lemieux LA.
Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, rangi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Premature babies may have higher risk of mental health problems
Higher risk runs from childhood into at least 30s, says study Related items fromOnMedica Unhealthy diet during pregnancy may be linked to ADHD New treatment options for ADHD Advise a year between pregnancies after preterm birth Scientists identify substance that protects against preterm birth Fifth of all children referred to specialist mental health services rejected for treatment (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 14, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Very premature babies at risk of mental health problems – research
Studies reveal greater likelihood of attention disorders, shyness and anxiety in childhood and then adulthood for survivors with very low birth weight of 1kgChildren who are born very prematurely are at greater risk of developing mental health and social problems that can persist well into adulthood, according to one of the largest reviews of evidence.Those with an extremely low birth weight, at less than a kilogram, are more likely to have attention disorders and social difficulties as children, and feel more shyness, anxiety and depression as adults, than those born a healthy weight.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Psychology Biology Mental health Science Anxiety Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Society Children Childbirth Source Type: news

How being a premature baby affects you for life
Canadian researchers analysed 41 previous studies that followed 2,712 premature babies. They found an extremely low birth weight increased the risk of mental health disorders in childhood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Premature babies at greater risk of mental health problems such as depression and anxiety
'SUGAR BAG' babies, those born very premature, are at greater risk of developing mental problems including depression and anxiety into their 30s, a new study warns. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tiny Babies May Face Mental Health Problems Later
Review found greater likelihood of ADHD, anxiety and depressionSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Mental Health, Premature Babies (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Exposure to nicotine before and after birth causes hearing difficulties in children
A new mouse study investigates the neurological impact of perinatal exposure to nicotine. The findings suggests nicotine impacts the offspring's hearing. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hearing / Deafness Source Type: news

Using a Consensus Bundle to Improve Maternal Mental Health Using a Consensus Bundle to Improve Maternal Mental Health
A new consensus bundle provides aims to help healthcare providers implement evidence-based guidelines intended for the diagnosis and management of perinatal maternal mental health conditions.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Indian boy with four legs and two penises has operation
Parents Lalitamma, 23, and Chennabasava, 26, initially didn't want the baby to have surgery. He was transferred to a neonatal unit in Bellari, India. The boy now has two legs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Department of Health Services Report Highlights Opioid Overdose and Death Rates in Wisconsin
The rate of opioid overdose deaths in Wisconsin has nearly doubled over the last decade, according to a new Department of Health Services (DHS) report, “Select Opioid-Related Morbidity and Mortality Data for Wisconsin. ” The report provides statewide and county-level data on opioid-related deaths and hospital visits; neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), in which an infant is born with withdrawal symptoms from substances taken by the mother; and data on...(see release) (Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - February 9, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Authors: fischsbpbb Source Type: news

Preemies Bombarded with Noise in First Weeks of Life
But private rooms may not be the solution, study suggests Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Noise, Premature Babies (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - February 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Preemies Bombarded With Noise in First Weeks of Life
THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 -- Hospitals are noisy -- maybe too noisy for the tiniest patients, a new study suggests. Researchers found that premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are exposed to potentially harmful noise levels --... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 9, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

New Neonatal Ambulance Improves Care at University of Mississippi Medical Center
As a registered nurse, Morgan Strickland of Meridian knew having medical transport available was important. But when her son Jack needed life-saving care, she realized how vital an ambulance specializing in newborn care could be. Jack, now an active 3-year-old, was transferred to the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson in the facility's ambulance customized to care for babies. Read More at Meridianstar (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

New Neonatal Ambulance Improves Care at University of Mississippi Medical Center
As a registered nurse, Morgan Strickland of Meridian knew having medical transport available was important. But when her son Jack needed life-saving care, she realized how vital an ambulance specializing in newborn care could be. Jack, now an active 3-year-old, was transferred to the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson in the facility's ambulance customized to care for babies. Read More at Meridianstar (Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News)
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Iranian Baby Barred By Travel Ban Enters U.S. For Lifesaving Surgery
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); An Iranian baby girl denied entry to the U.S. for lifesaving surgery under President Donald Trump’s travel ban has a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Preemies in neonatal intensive care units exposed to loud noises
Preemies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics, suggests new research. Conversely, the researchers also found that some preemies may not get enough exposure to beneficial sounds, such as language and music, that can improve early development. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 8, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study shows need to reduce loud noises in NICU
Amy WallaceFeb. 8 (UPI) -- A study from Washington University School of Medicine has found that premature babies are exposed to unsafe noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Lancet Global Health
Open-access, online journal dedicated to publishing content on low- and middle-income countries, including reproductive, maternal, neonatal, and child health; adolescent health; infectious diseases, including neglected tropical diseases; non-communicable diseases; mental health; the global health workforce; health systems; health policy; and public health. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

CDC - Perinatal Quality Collaboratives Webinar Series
February 17, 2017 1-2:30pm ET. This webinar will provide an overview of CDC-supported state-based activities to prevent healthcare-associated infections, discuss improving antibiotic use in newborn patients, and present the Perinatal Quality Collaborative of North Carolina ' s antibiotic stewardship efforts. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - February 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

NICU study highlights need to reduce loud noises, boost beneficial sounds
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that preemies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Conversely, the researchers also found that some preemies may not get enough exposure to beneficial sounds, such as language and music, that can improve early development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How This Crocheted Octopus Is Changing The Lives Of Preemies
A hospital in England has changed the lives of its preemie patients with help from some crocheted octopus friends. In November, Poole Hospital in Dorset, England, announced in a press release that its preemies were seeing beneficial effects from simply cuddling a crocheted octopus. Daniel Lockyer, matron of neonatal services at the hospital, said moms and dads are thrilled to see their preemies find comfort with the little aquatic pals. “Parents are already telling us their babies seem calmer with an octopi friend to keep them company so we’re looking forward to continuing with the project in the future,&r...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mednax expands its neonatal practice with acquisition
Mednax acquired Spring, Texas-based Newborn Intensive Care Specialists, marking its third acquisition of 2017. The Sunrise-based company (NYSE: MD) didn’t disclose the price of the acquisition, but said it paid cash. Founded in 2000, Newborn Intensive Care Specialists has 27 full-time clinicians, including 14 physicians. Its neonatology practice serves seven hospitals in the Houston and Dallas markets. T he practice averages more than 40,000 patient days across those hospitals. “As health care… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brian Bandell Source Type: news

Cincinnati Zoo's Premature Baby Hippo Takes Wobbly First Steps
After a few shaky days, Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden's premature baby hippo, Fiona, took her wobbly first steps in the wee hours of Sunday morning. Hippo's are nocturnal, so it's not surprising that she would get a burst of energy when most people are sleeping. It was a pleasant surprise, however, to see this much movement from her following several days of setbacks. As recently as yesterday, the six-week-premature calf was having trouble getting enough oxygen and had to be tube fed by vet staff. The last really positive report from the Zoo was posted last week when Fiona was showing progress in her pool. Her...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Signs Of Depression And Anxiety Can Be Seen In Newborns
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Signs Of Depression And Anxiety Can Be Seen In Newborns
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Immigration Raids Tied to Greater Risk of Underweight Babies Immigration Raids Tied to Greater Risk of Underweight Babies
In the aftermath of an immigration raid, Latina women in the U.S. may be more likely to have low birthweight or premature babies even when they are citizens, a new study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - February 2, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Borna Disease Virus, Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder & Depression
This study closes the door on the relationship between BDV and mental illness in humans. There is no apparent connection between the Borna Disease Virus and schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or depression.   References Bautista J R, Schwartz G J, de la Torre J C, Moran T H, Carbone K M. Early and persistent abnormalities in rats with neonatally acquired Borna disease virus infection. Brain Res Bull. 1994;34:31–40. Carbone, K. M. (2001). Borna Disease Virus and Human Disease. Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 14(3), 513–527. http://doi.org/10.1128/CMR.14.3.513-527.2001 Dittrich W, Bode L, Ludwig H, Kao M, Schneider K. ...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Bipolar Depression Disorders General Schizophrenia BDV behavioral symptoms Bipolar Disorder Borna disease virus borna virus Infectious disease Source Type: news

Coming together from worlds apart for spina bifida care
.twentytwenty-before-label:before {content: "2014" !important; }.twentytwenty-after-label:before {content: "2016" !important; } Molly Gotbeter giggles impishly as she accepts a sugar cookie and frosting from a nurse. She’s sitting patiently on an exam table waiting to see one of her favorite people in the world — Benjamin Warf, MD, director of Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery at Boston Children’s Hospital. For this visit to the spina bifida clinic, Molly has traveled from her home in Charleston, South Carolina. But her journey to Dr. Warf and Boston Children’s has been much longer. Molly was born in a ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 2, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Benjamin Warf Dr. Terry Buchmiller neonatal and congenital anomaly neurosurgery spina bifida Spina Bifida Center Spina Bifida Clinic tethered cord Source Type: news