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NIH Statement on World Tuberculosis Day
TB is the world ’s leading cause of death from an infectious disease, especially among women and children. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - March 24, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Self-Collected Specimens for Infectious Disease Testing
Self-collected specimens for infectious disease testing are becoming more commonplace. There are multiple published studies demonstrating that self-collected vaginal swabs for detection of sexually transmitted pathogens are as accurate as physician-collected endocervical swabs. Similarly, self-collected penile-meatal swabs are also acceptable for detecting sexually transmitted pathogens; however, unlike self-collected vaginal swabs, penile-meatal swabs are not considered an “on-label” specimen for U.S. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Fred C. Tenover, Ellen Jo Baron, Charlotte A. Gaydos Source Type: news

Rwanda: World TB Day - an Opportunity to Galvanise United Action to End the Disease
[New Times] On the occasion of World Tuberculosis Day celebration today, it is important to reflect on the 2017 theme: "Unite To End Tuberculosis" and its implications for ending transmission of the deadly disease in Africa and Rwanda in particular. (Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis)
Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis - March 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

One Little Girl Beat The Deadliest Form Of Tuberculosis. She Is Very Lucky.
WASHINGTON ― When Baltimore resident Arjun kisses his 6-year-old daughter’s forehead, it’s not always just a sign of affection. His daughter, Sujata, is onto him. “Is that a temperature kiss?” she asks. Arjun compulsively checks his little girl’s temperature for a reason. Sujata is the survivor of the “first well-described case” of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in a young child in the U.S., according to her physicians. Tuberculosis is the world’s biggest killer among infectious diseases, and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis ― or XDR-TB, which is re...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One Little Girl Beat The Deadliest Form Of Tuberculosis. She Is Very Lucky.
WASHINGTON ― When Baltimore resident Arjun kisses his 6-year-old daughter’s forehead, it’s not always just a sign of affection. His daughter, Sujata, is onto him. “Is that a temperature kiss?” she asks. Arjun compulsively checks his little girl’s temperature for a reason. Sujata is the survivor of the “first well-described case” of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in a young child in the U.S., according to her physicians. Tuberculosis is the world’s biggest killer among infectious diseases, and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis ― or XDR-TB, which is re...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Uganda: We Need to Find Missing Tuberculosis Patients
[Monitor] Uganda once again joins the rest of the World in commemorating the World Tuberculosis (TB) Day; an annual event that honours the day that Dr Robert Koch announced his discovery of mycobacterium tuberculosis, the germ that causes TB, in Berlin Germany in 1882. This day is designed to build public awareness that tuberculosis remains an epidemic, as it was 135 years ago in much of the world, causing the deaths of nearly one-and-a-half million people each year, mostly in developing countries. (Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis)
Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis - March 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Uganda: Fix Health Service Delivery Gaps to Get Rid of Tuberculosis
[Monitor] Today is the World Tuberculosis (TB) day, a day designated to build public awareness that TB is an enormous public health threat. According to statistics from the World Health Organisation (WHO), one-third of the world's population is infected by TB, and is currently an epidemic in much of the world, causing mortality of about 1.5 - 1.8 million people per annum especially in less developed countries like Uganda. Indeed TB threat is endemic in lower and middle income countries, to the extent that an overwhe (Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis)
Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis - March 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nigeria: NACA Urges Stronger Collaboration Between TB, HIV Programmes
[Premium Times] The National Agency for the Control of AIDS, NACA, has called on state governments to create stronger collaboration between their programmes for the treatment of Tuberculosis and HIV. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - March 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Tuberculosis Drugs May Become Ineffective: Study
A doctor examines the x-ray of a TB patient in New Delhi. Credit: Bijoyeta Das/IPS.By Lyndal RowlandsUNITED NATIONS, Mar 24 2017 (IPS)New antibiotics that could treat tuberculosis may rapidly become ineffective, according to new research published by the Lancet ahead of World Tuberculosis Day.The rise in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, which affected 480,000 people in 2015, could mean that even newly discovered drugs will soon be useless, the study found.In total both drug resistant and non-drug resistant Tuberculosis (TB) killed an estimated 1.8 million people in 2015, making it the world’s deadliest infectious dise...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Lyndal Rowlands Tags: Featured Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Antibiotic Resistance Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Source Type: news

U.S. Perinatal HIV Infection Fell to 69 Infants in 2013: CDC U.S. Perinatal HIV Infection Fell to 69 Infants in 2013: CDC
Perinatal HIV infection steadily declined in the U.S. between 2002 and 2013, but “ missed opportunities ” remain for preventing transmission, according to new research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

For Ugandan Children, Hunger and HIV Make a Deadly Mix For Ugandan Children, Hunger and HIV Make a Deadly Mix
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus – China
On 17 March 2017, the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China (NHFPC) notified WHO of 22 additional laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in mainland China. (Source: WHO Avian Influenza)
Source: WHO Avian Influenza - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: avian influenza [subject], bird flu, avian flu, fowl plague, influenza in birds, avian bird flu, h5n1, avian influenza [subject], bird flu, avian flu, fowl plague, influenza in birds, avian bird flu, h5n1, influenza [subject], flu, seasonal influenza, pan Source Type: news

Strategies for Superbugs: Antibiotic Stewardship for Rural Hospitals
Article outlines how rural hospitals can and are implementing recommended hospital antibiotic stewardship processes. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - March 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

These 3 Superbugs Pose The Greatest Risk To Human Health
The World Health Organization is issuing a warning about a group of deadly bacteria: Recently, the WHO released its first-ever list of “priority pathogens,” a list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that the organization says pose the greatest threat to human health. The list is divided into three categories: critical-, high- and medium-priority. Three pathogens made it into the critical-priority group. These bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and pose a high risk to people in hospitals and nursing homes, the WHO says. Multidrug-resistant bacteria, sometimes called “superbugs,” are a ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Global TB Control Falling Short, Drug Resistance Rising Global TB Control Falling Short, Drug Resistance Rising
Expanded initiatives to control TB and fight the global rise in multidrug-resistant TB are needed to eliminate the disease, experts say on the eve of World TB Day, March 24.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - March 23, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Morning Break: Still No Healthcare Deal; Califf ' s New Gig
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web, gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Superbug tuberculosis threatens global control efforts
Experts warn of possible epidemic over next decade (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Small molecule may stop infectious biofilms growing on medical implants
Study shows that a small molecule can block the formation of adhesive bonds that help growth of S. aureus biofilms, a cause of implant-related infections. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

2nd Gulf Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017Year: 2017Location:  Manama, Kingdom of BahrainContent-type: current_conferences (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - March 23, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: GAtherton Source Type: news

Kenya: Mass Distribution of 15mn Mosquito Nets Kicks Off in 23 Counties
[Capital FM] Nairobi -The government has kicked off a mass campaign to distribute 15 million long lasting insecticide treated nets to 23 counties that are malaria prone. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Spatio-temporal patterns of gun violence in Syracuse, New York 2009-2015 - Larsen DA, Lane S, Jennings-Bey T, Haygood-El A, Brundage K, Rubinstein RA.
Gun violence in the United States of America is a large public health problem that disproportionately affects urban areas. The epidemiology of gun violence reflects various aspects of an infectious disease including spatial and temporal clustering. We exam... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Preventing Transmission of Chronic HBV During Pregnancy Preventing Transmission of Chronic HBV During Pregnancy
What is the optimal timing of lamivudine therapy during pregnancy to reduce risk of HBV transmission while minimizing fetal exposure and drug resistance?Journal of Viral Hepatitis (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

Effective one-shot vaccination of newborns moves closer to reality
(Boston Children's Hospital) Newborns are highly vulnerable to infections and don't respond optimally to most vaccines because their young immune systems typically mount weak antibody responses. Now, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital report achieving strong vaccine responses in newborn animals, including monkeys -- the final preclinical model before human trials -- by adding compounds known as adjuvants that boost the immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Immune study in chickens reveals key hurdle for Campylobacter vaccine effort
(University of Liverpool) New University of Liverpool research reveals that the immune response of farmed chickens does not develop fast enough to fight off Campylobacter during their short lifespan. The findings have important implications in the challenge towards developing a poultry vaccine for the bug, which is the UK's leading cause of food poisoning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New CDISC data standard aids development of therapies for Ebola virus
(Infectious Diseases Data Observatory) The Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) and the Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO) announce the availability of a new standard to assist in the collection, aggregation and analysis of Ebola virus disease (EVD) research data. This standard is for use in EVD trials, leading to potential treatments and public health surveillance for this disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists assemble Zika virus mosquito genome from scratch
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team of scientists has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Most dengue infections transmitted in or near home
(University of Florida) The majority of dengue virus infections appear to happen very close to home and are transmitted from the same family of mosquitoes, suggests new research led by the University of Florida and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What does congenital Zika syndrome look like?
(University of California - San Diego) In a new paper, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, along with colleagues in Brazil and Spain, describe the phenotypic spectrum or set of observable characteristics of congenital Zika (ZIKV) syndrome, based upon clinical evaluations and neuroimaging of 83 Brazilian children with presumed or confirmed ZIKV congenital infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fighting malaria through metabolism
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL scientists have fully modeled the metabolism of the deadliest malaria parasite. The model offers unprecedented tools for developing a new generation of antimalarial therapies to overcome drug resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Most dengue infections transmitted in and around home
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Transmission of the mosquito-borne dengue virus appears to be largely driven by infections centered in and around the home, with the majority of cases related to one another occurring in people who live less than 200 meters apart, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Florida suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fighting malaria through mathematical analysis of parasite's metabolism
(PLOS) A new mathematical model, based on the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, could help develop antimalarials by identifying key metabolic targets, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by Vassily Hatzimanikatis at É cole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mosquito monitoring has limited utility in dengue control, study finds
(PLOS) Cross-sectional surveys of mosquito abundance carried out in the subtropics and tropics are meant to give researchers an indication of the risk of a dengue virus outbreak in any given area. This type of entomological monitoring, however, is not a good proxy for dengue risk, researchers report this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rise of superbug tuberculosis hampers global control efforts
London (Reuters) - Rising rates of superbug tuberculosis (TB) are threatening to derail decades of progress against the contagious disease, experts said on Thursday, and new drugs powerful enough to treat them are few and far between. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Why is handwashing so important?
“clean hands” by Arlington County is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0. According to MedlinePlus, you should wash your hands for at least 20 seconds. You may be more familiar with that rule of thumb to sing the “Happy Birthday” song at least two times through before turning off that faucet. But while we’re admonished to do so, it’s difficult to say what’s actually put into practice even while we know it helps stop the spread of germs. In fact, it can even help stop the spread of superbugs! How else is it important? The Center for Disease Control has put together some fast facts (and citations) on the importance of...
Source: Network News - March 22, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NN/LM South Central Region Tags: Consumer Health General (all entries) Public Health Source Type: news

Rotavirus vaccine could save lives of almost 500,000 children a year
Positive outcome of trials in Niger fuels hope that vaccine can protect children in sub-Saharan Africa and beyond from infection that causes often fatal diarrhoeaA vaccine capable of enduring scorching temperatures for months at a time could strike a decisive blow in the fight against rotavirus, preventing nearly half a million children around the world from dying of diarrhoea each year.M édecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has hailed successful trials of the BRV-PV vaccine in Niger as a “game changer” in tackling rotavirus infection, which is the leading cause of severe diarrhoea globally and claims the lives of anestimat...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kate Hodal Tags: Global health Global development Vaccines and immunisation Society Africa World news Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

Silence is golden -- Suppressing host response to Ebola virus may help to control infection
(Boston University Medical Center) The Ebola virus causes a severe, often fatal illness when it infects the human body. Initially targeting cells of the immune system called macrophages, white blood cells that absorb and clear away pathogens, a new study has found a way to potentially 'silence' these Ebola virus-infected macrophages.The findings, which appear in the Journal of Virology, could lead to new treatment options for Ebola virus disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New low-cost rotavirus vaccine could reduce disease burden in developing countries
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) A new vaccine for rotavirus was found to be 66.7 percent effective in preventing severe gastroenteritis caused by the virus, according to a new study from researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Epicentre, Paris. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Database for Reference Grade Microbial Sequences (FDA-ARGOS)
Many infectious diseases have similar signs and symptoms, making it challenging for healthcare providers to identify the disease-causing agent. Clinical samples are often tested by multiple test methods to help reveal the particular microbe that is... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - March 22, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Tuberculosis Deaths Fall in Europe Tuberculosis Deaths Fall in Europe
The number of people developing and dying from tuberculosis (TB) is falling in Europe, but among the most vulnerable - including migrants, prisoners and people who are HIV positive - there have been worrying increases, data showed on Monday.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Yellow Fever Vaccine Advised for Travel to Brazil ' s Rio, Sao Paulo States Yellow Fever Vaccine Advised for Travel to Brazil ' s Rio, Sao Paulo States
The World Health Organization on Monday recommended that travelers to rural areas in the states of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo get yellow fever vaccinations, as Brazil works to contain an outbreak of the virus in the country ' s southeast.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - March 21, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Blood, Sweat, and Tears? The Presence of Zika in the Eye Blood, Sweat, and Tears? The Presence of Zika in the Eye
Animal studies have now shown a possible role for tears in transmitting this potentially devastating virus. What might this mean for people? This commentary takes a closer look.Medscape Optometry (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Ophthalmology Viewpoint Source Type: news

Morning Break: AHCA Tweaked; ' The Talk ' with Oldsters; More Drug Ads
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web, gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Images reveal humanity's harshest diseases in colour scans
The scans and x-rays, provided by the Maryland-based US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, show the shocking extent to which some diseases can affect the body. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hospitals in New York State are witnessing a deadly drug resistant fungal infection outbreak
(Natural News) More than 30 cases of infection from a deadly fungal superbug have now been confirmed in the United States, with 28 of the 35 reported cases occurring in hospitals located in New York State. Last year, health officials warned that cases of the highly drug-resistant fungus, Candida auris, might soon appear in the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. Sees Big Drop in Number of Babies Born With HIV
Title: U.S. Sees Big Drop in Number of Babies Born With HIVCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/20/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/21/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet HIV General)
Source: MedicineNet HIV General - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Sussex Drug Discovery Centre & ReViral reach clinical trial with lung virus treatment
(University of Sussex) Sussex Drug Discovery Centre& ReViral reached a clinical trial with a 'game changer' treatment for respiratory syncytial virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Interferon drug shows promise in treating Ebola
(University Health Network) A pilot study of a class of drugs used to treat hepatitis and some forms of multiple sclerosis has been shown for the first time to ease symptoms of Ebola patients, while also increasing their survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How prenatal maternal infections may affect genetic factors in Autism spectrum disorder
(University of California - San Diego) In a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, University of Cyprus and Stanford University map the complex biological cascade caused by MIA: the expression of multiple genes involved in autism are turned up or down by MIA, affecting key aspects of prenatal brain development that may increase risk for atypical development later in life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

From Genome Research: Pathogen demonstrates genome flexibility in cystic fibrosis
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) Chronic lung infections can be devastating for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia, one of the most common species found in cystic fibrosis patients, is often antibiotic resistant. In a study published today in Genome Research, scientists sequenced and phenotyped multiple B. cenocepacia isolates from 16 CF patients. They found extensive variation among isolates during chronic lung infection as well as changes in clinically relevant bacterial phenotypes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HIV co-infection influences natural selection on M. tuberculosis
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) While M. tuberculosis has been evolving with humans for thousands of years, HIV co-infections create host immunological environments that this bacterium has not encountered before and could, therefore, be nudging it to evolve new characteristics. Now, an evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis full genome sequences from HIV uninfected and HIV co-infected individuals uncovered specific sites within M. tuberculosis genomes where the bacterium may have been compelled to evolve in response to HIV-1 co-infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news