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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory.

California Is The First State To Require Spiritual Care In Health Care
If you get sick in California, and you are covered by the state's Medi-Cal health insurance, you will be pleased to know that your health care just got better. California is the first state to recognize that spiritual care is a standalone discipline in health care and a trained and certified palliative care chaplain must be available for any patient who wants one. Spirituality, defined in the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care is a "fundamental aspect of compassionate, patient-and family-centered care that honors the dignity of all persons." The California Department of Health Care Services policy n...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

WHO (World Health Organization) ' S Work in Health Emergency Management: WHO Health Emergencies Program
World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization. 09/13/2016 This five-page document, prepared for the 68th Session of the Regional Committee of the World Health Organization (WHO) for the Americas in September 2016, provides information about the Health Emergencies Program, which adds operational capacity to WHO ' s work in outbreaks and humanitarian emergencies to complement its traditional technical and normative roles. It was established to provide one single program, with a workforce, a budget, standards and processes, and clear lines of authority. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Me...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - September 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Federally qualified health center access and emergency department use among children - Nath JB, Costigan S, Lin F, Vittinghoff E, Hsia RY.
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether increasing access to federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) in California was associated with decreased rates of emergency department (ED) use by children without insurance or insured by Medicaid. METHODS: We com... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Cleveland Clinic Florida breaks ground on major expansion
Cleveland Clinic Florida broke ground on the expansion of its Weston campus on Sept. 27 as part of $302 million in capital investments to its facilities. The nonprofit hospital will build a 180,000-square-foot tower with 75 beds and services for critical care, surgery, medical specialties and transplants. It will also include a new women’s center and cafeteria. The expansion will increase its emergency room capacity by 25 percent. The building w as designed by Skidmore, Owings& Merrill. The general … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 30, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brian Bandell Source Type: news

St. Vincent's begins slow rollout of Chilton County hospital
St. Vincent's new Chilton County hospital will open next week for scheduled visits in its speciality service office. The full facility will open at a later date, a St. Vincent's spokesperson said Friday, following a state licensure survey. The hospital, located in Clanton, will include acute care and outpatient services, in addition to a 24/7 emergency department. St. Vincent's Chilton will also provide diagnos tics, intensive care and surgery services. St. Vincent's is slated to operate the 30-bed… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 30, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Melissa Brown Source Type: news

Morning Break: Bigger Zika Risk; ' Funny ' Brownies; Phony Vaccines
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web, gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Emergency Medicine)
Source: MedPage Today Emergency Medicine - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: news

Investigation Begins in Hoboken Train Crash
HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) — Federal investigators are trying to determine what happened before a commuter train barreled through a station and crashed into a barrier, causing a young mother to be killed by falling debris and injuring more than 100 other people. Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board will be looking to determine how fast the train was going when it crashed at the busy Hoboken station Thursday morning. They hope to speak to the train's injured engineer on Friday, NTSB Vice Chairman T. Bella Dinh-Zarr said. State officials say he has been cooperating. The investigation will seek to answe...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Mass Casualty Incidents Major Incidents Source Type: news

Congress Overrides President ’s Veto of 9/11 Bill
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a resounding rebuke, Democrats joined with Republicans Wednesday to hand Barack Obama the first veto override of his presidency, voting overwhelmingly to allow families of Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts for its alleged backing of the attackers. Both the House and Senate voted decisively to reverse Obama's decision to scuttle the legislation. Democrats in both chambers abandoned the president in large numbers despite warnings from Obama and top national security officials that flaws in the bill could put U.S. interests, troops, and intelligence personnel at risk. The Senate ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Congress Overrides President ’s Veto of 9/11 Bill
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a resounding rebuke, Democrats joined with Republicans Wednesday to hand Barack Obama the first veto override of his presidency, voting overwhelmingly to allow families of Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts for its alleged backing of the attackers. Both the House and Senate voted decisively to reverse Obama's decision to scuttle the legislation. Democrats in both chambers abandoned the president in large numbers despite warnings from Obama and top national security officials that flaws in the bill could put U.S. interests, troops, and intelligence personnel at risk. The Senate ...
Source: JEMS Operations - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Houston Firefighters ’ Union Calls for Body Armor
HOUSTON (Click2Houston) - Firefighters should have city-issued bulletproof vests to wear during active shooter situations, according to the president of the Houston Professional Firefighters Union.   Alvin White, who is near the end of his term as president of the union, told Channel 2 Investigates Thursday that firefighters would be safer if they had vests. Firefighters were among first responders who arrived on scene Monday when an active shooter situation played out in Houston. No firefighters were hurt. (Source: JEMS Operations)
Source: JEMS Operations - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Operations Equipment & Gear News Videos Source Type: news

London schoolgirl spends weeks in coma after birthmark on her BRAIN popped
Rachel Cunningham, 12, from London, went to school complaining of a headache in February. She collapsed after suffering a massive brain haemorrhage and needed emergency surgery. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WCA expansion puts inpatient services in one spot
An expansion and renovation at WCA Hospital in Jamestown will bring all inpatient programs under one roof for the first time, helping to improve services for patients and reduce costs for the hospital. CEO Betsy Wright said the $23 million project will bring inpatient mental health programs for adults and adolescents over to the main hospital from the Jones Memorial Health Center campus on Glasgow Avenue about a mile away. The two-story addition will be built atop the emergency department, with… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 30, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

WCA expansion puts inpatient services in one spot
An expansion and renovation at WCA Hospital in Jamestown will bring all inpatient programs under one roof for the first time, helping to improve services for patients and reduce costs for the hospital. CEO Betsy Wright said the $23 million project will bring inpatient mental health programs for adults and adolescents over to the main hospital from the Jones Memorial Health Center campus on Glasgow Avenue about a mile away. The two-story addition will be built atop the emergency department, with… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 30, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

JEMS Special Focus: Ambulance Innovations
We present innovations crafted by the ambulance manufacturers and companies that produce audible, vibrational and visual warning systems, as well as newer, safer, more comfortable and, most importantly, adjustable, seats.  Welcome to the JEMS Special Focus: Ambulance Innovations Designing a Custom-Built Ambulance that Balances Safety and Efficiency Lights and Sirens Improve Safety of Emergency Calls New Ambulance Seating Improves Safety, Size and Functionality Safety Systems Impact the Cost of EMS (Source: JEMS Operations)
Source: JEMS Operations - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Source Type: news

Lights and Sirens Improve Safety of Emergency Calls
As the bay doors open and we pull into traffic, I know this is going to be a challenging emergency run. It's 5 p.m. on a hot summer night and there's bumper-to-bumper traffic. The incident we were just dispatched to sounds very serious, so I know time is of the essence. Someone's life depends on our unit getting to them quickly and safely in the chaos of Friday night rush hour. When we hit Prince and Main Street I can see we aren't going anywhere quickly: Gridlock! I change the siren tone and lay on the air horn, but no one's moving. Why? Are they distracted by texting, loud stereos, telephone calls or crying children? May...
Source: JEMS Operations - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Wayne M. Zygowicz, MS, EFO, EMT-P Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Source Type: news

Pro Bono: Distracted Driving is an EMS Liability Time Bomb
If EMS personnel are seriously hurt or killed on the job, chances are that the injury or death was related to emergency vehicle operations. Operating any vehicle carries inherent risks, however, those risks are amplified when emergency vehicle operators engage in unsafe, but avoidable, practices that should be substantially curtailed or completely eliminated. Driving is risky enough; don't make it unnecessarily riskier. Ambulance crashes have a high human cost. But the liability risks can also be astronomical. Verdicts, judgments and settlements can easily exceed the insurance policy coverage limits. Worse yet, if a crash ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Wolfberg Tags: Columns Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Intoxicated Patient's Injury is More than Originally Suspected
It's near the end of a 24-hour shift when the call comes. EMS is dispatched to a residence for a 20-something-year-old male who's reportedly fallen at home while intoxicated and has facial trauma. His family was unable to get him into their private vehicle, so 9-1-1 is called for ambulance transport to the ED of the local rural hospital. At the scene, the patient is found lying supine on the floor, attended by family members. Upon entering the residence, blood is noted on the floor. The patient tracks the responders' movement with his eyes as he's approached. Figure 1: Location of patient's injuries He's responsive to ver...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seth A. Huntington, NREMT-P Tags: Trauma Patient Care Source Type: news

Pediatric Anaphylaxis Study Lacks Crucial Details
The Research Carrillo E, Hern HG, Barger J. Prehospital administration of epinephrine in pediatric anaphylaxis. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2016;20(2):239–244. The Science To assess the rates of administration of epinephrine, diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and albuterol to children with allergic reactions including anaphylaxis, the authors reviewed the EMS records of Contra Costa County and Alameda County in California from January 2010 to July 2011. Combined, the two counties serve a population of about 2.3 million people. Of the slightly more than 239,000 patient contacts and 13,000 pediatric transports, paramedics treated 205 p...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Columns Patient Care Source Type: news

Patient Care Diminishes When Patients are Perceived Negatively
"Dispatch, you can show Medic 3 on scene." There had been no calls up to that point-that point being 14 hours into my 1,440 minute shift and predictably, I was toned out just as I was crawling into bed. My monotone voice announcing my rig's arrival had a hint of articulated whimper with just a slight dash of disdain added on the distal consonant for attitudinal effect. I was tired. More importantly, my adrenals were tired-tired of being on standby mode for so long with nothing to show for it. Then again, I should know better. It was, after all, that magic hour when a few selected ETOH (Extremely Trashed Or Hammer...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Steve Berry Tags: Columns Patient Care Source Type: news

Anticipating and Treating the Most Common Complications of Prehospital Intubation
There's one specific psychomotor skill that still carries more clout than almost anything else in EMS. It's the skill that's too often used as a means of measuring adequacy, expertise, competence and ability: endotracheal intubation (ETI). As a profession, EMS affords ETI some bizarre form of idolatry. The ability, opportunity and permission to place a piece of plastic into someone's mid-trachea is, for whatever reason, considered the gold standard of practice. The actual skill itself can be successfully performed in a few simple steps, but it's by no means easy. After all, there are a host of circumstances that make ETI a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Robert P. Girardeau, BS, NREMT-P, FP-C Tags: Airway & Respiratory Source Type: news

iBeat launches wearable heart monitor
iBeat said today that it launched its wearable heart monitor on Indiegogo. The campaign began this morning and features a 78% sale on the device at $99 for 100 early-bird backers. The San Francisco, Calif.-based start-up raised $1.5 million in seed funding in August to recruit “high profile talent” to expand its operations. Dr. Mehmet Oz joined the company as a special advisor and is assisting in the launch, according to iBeat. The iBeat Life Monitor is a smartwatch that continuously monitors a user’s heart rate and will warn loved ones and emergency responders if it detects signs of an oncoming cardiac arrest and th...
Source: Mass Device - September 29, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiovascular mHealth (Mobile Health) Patient Monitoring iBeat Source Type: news

Medevac Crashes Outside Oklahoma Hospital
    LAWTON, OK (KSWO) - A helicopter crashed outside Comanche County Memorial Hospital around 6:00 a.m. on Thursday. The Survival Flight Medical Company helicopter made an emergency landing. Lori Cummins, the Marketing Director for Comanche County Memorial, says the pilot of the helicopter was able to safely land on Gore Boulevard.Witnesses say the chopper was landing at the hospital and may have lost power. (Source: JEMS Operations)
Source: JEMS Operations - September 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: KSWO Tags: News Videos Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Source Type: news

Do You Know What to Do for Pet-Related Emergencies?
We see preparedness as a critical component in all aspects of life, and furry family members are no exception. Whether you have a Great Dane or a tiny kitten, pets ... The post Do You Know What to... {This is a content summary only. Click the blog post title to continue reading this post, share your comments, browse the blog and more!} (Source: Red Cross Chat)
Source: Red Cross Chat - September 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Emily Tuite Tags: Health & Safety emergency first aid mobile app pet safety Source Type: news

ECG Reveals Effects of Multi-Substance Suicide Attempt
The Case Medic 49 was called to a wooded area near a private residence for a missing person and concern for overdose. Police were already on scene and had walked approximately 0.5 miles into the wooded area behind the home where they found a 30-year-old female unresponsive with several pill bottles nearby. The family, who had reported the patient missing, stated that the patient had a history of suicidal thoughts. On EMS arrival, the patient was still unresponsive and hypoxic with an oxygen saturation of 76% on RA. The patient was also tachycardic to 130 and had an initial blood pressure of 140/90. The patient was not movi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeffrey J. Bell, RN, BSN, CEN, NREMT-P Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Most Sepsis Cases Begin Outside of the Hospital
Sepsis is a medical emergency that begins outside of the hospital in 79% of cases. In addition, 72% of patients with sepsis had recently used health care services or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - September 29, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Doug Brunk Source Type: news

A Fifth of Emergency CRC Cases ' Could Be Spotted Earlier ' A Fifth of Emergency CRC Cases ' Could Be Spotted Earlier '
Approximately one fifth of patients with colorectal cancer who present in an emergency setting have had ' red flag ' symptoms in the year before diagnosis and could have been identified earlier, say UK researchers.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - September 29, 2016 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Train Crashes into Hoboken Station, Over 100 Injured
HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) — A commuter train from New York barreled into a New Jersey rail station without stopping and crashed during the Thursday morning rush hour, injuring more than 100 people, some of them critically, authorities said. Photos: Train Crashes into Hoboken Station Witnesses reported seeing one woman trapped under concrete and many people bleeding after the New Jersey Transit train crashed at the Hoboken station. "We have multiple injuries, multiple critical injuries right now," said Jennifer Nelson, a spokeswoman for NJ Transit. "The terminal is shut down." She said she doesn't kn...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Major Incidents Source Type: news

Bus Crash Injures Over 40 in UAE
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Police in Abu Dhabi say 47 people have been injured, two of them seriously, in a crash that involved school buses. The crash happened Thursday morning on a bridge in the capital of the United Arab Emirates and involved two school buses and another bus. Police said the injured had been transported to a hospital. It wasn't clear how many of the injured were school children. Police also did not name the schools affected by the crash. Aggressive driving is common on Emirati roads. Police did not immediately offer a reason for the crash. Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All r...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Mass Casualty Incidents Source Type: news

South Carolina Firefighter Stops School Shooting
TOWNVILLE, S.C. (AP) — A volunteer firefighter stopped a teenager who shot two students and a teacher outside a South Carolina elementary school after killing his father at their home, authorities said. Anderson County Sheriff John Skipper said the shooter was apprehended Wednesday afternoon outside rural Townville Elementary School before he could get inside the building. Firefighter Jamie Brock, a 30-year veteran of the Townville Volunteer Fire Department down the road from the school, "just took him down," the sheriff said. He said the fire station is close to the school and Brock arrived before others...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Major Incidents Source Type: news

One in five bowel cancer patients could have been diagnosed earlier by a GP
Bowel cancer in around one in five patients diagnosed through emergency routes could have been detected earlier by a GPHide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - September 29, 2016 Category: Practice Management Authors: Carolyn Wickware Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Patient Access Patients Latest News Source Type: news

One in five bowel cancer patients could have been diagnosed earlier by a GP
Bowel cancer in around one in five patients diagnosed through emergency routes could have been detected earlier by a GPHide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Nursing in Practice)
Source: Nursing in Practice - September 29, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: carolynwickware Tags: Cancer Editor ' s pick Latest News Source Type: news

Nigeria: MSF Warns Against Humanitarian Condition of North-East
[This Day] Maiduguri -The humanitarian emergency in North-eastern part of Nigeria especially Borno State is reaching catastrophic levels, according to M édecins Sans Frontières, also known as Doctors Without Borders (MSF). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 29, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Emergency Use Authorizations: Zika Virus Detection by RT-PCR Test (ARUP Laboratories)
On September 28, 2016, the FDA issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for emergency use of ARUP Laboratories' Zika Virus Detection by RT-PCR test for the qualitative detection of RNA from Zika virus in human serum, EDTA plasma and urine... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - September 29, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

U.S. agency told Mylan that EpiPen was misclassified
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. federal health agency said on Wednesday it had "expressly advised" Mylan NV that the drugmaker had improperly classified its EpiPen emergency allergy treatment in a way that allowed it to pay lower rebates to state health programs. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Fierce Innovation Awards: Healthcare Edition Recognizes Pulsara as Finalist
[Bozeman, MT] — Sept. 28, 2016 — Pulsara announced today that they have been selected as a finalist in this year’s Fierce Innovation Awards: Healthcare Edition 2016, an awards program from the publisher of FierceHealthcare, FierceHealthIT, and FierceHealthPayer. Pulsara was recognized as a finalist in the category of Digital/Mobile Health Solutions. Pulsara was selected as a finalist for their innovative, industry leading product, the Pulsara platform, which currently includes STEMI and stroke modules, with sepsis and trauma in the works. Finalists were selected by a distinguished panel of CIOs from re...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Equipment & Gear Industry News Source Type: news

Active Shooter in S.C. Elementary School Wounds Students, Teacher
  TOWNVILLE, S.C. (AP) — A teenager killed his father at his home Wednesday before going to a nearby elementary school and opening fire with a handgun, wounding two students and a teacher, authorities said. The teen was apprehended within minutes of the school shooting in this rural town about 110 miles northeast of Atlanta. One of the students was shot in the leg and the other in the foot, Capt. Garland Major with the Anderson County sheriff's office said. Both students were male. The female teacher was hit in the shoulder. Before the shooting at Townville Elementary around 1:45 p.m., the teen gunned down his 47-ye...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JOHNNY CLARK, Associated Press Tags: News WMD & Terrorism Source Type: news

NSAIDs and COX 2s linked to heart failure admission
NSAIDs pose clear cardio risk to some people so tighter regulation is justified, say experts Related items fromOnMedica Painkiller raises risk of irregular heartbeat in older people GP prescribing intervention cuts emergency admissions Some common painkillers can raise heart risks Taking antidepressants with painkillers could increase risk of haemorrhage NICE calls for safer use of controlled drugs (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 29, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Fifth of emergency bowel cancer cases had red flag symptoms
GPs doing a good job but need better access to tools to support timely cancer diagnosis Related items fromOnMedica Scheme launched to personalise bowel cancer care New test prompts rise in bowel screening uptake Nearly a third of hospitals failing bowel cancer patients Screening drop-out rate higher after abnormal FOB test Early stage bowel cancer more likely to be picked up by screening (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 29, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Women using hormonal contraception at higher depression risk
Raised risk of depression and first use of antidepressant, especially in adolescents Related items fromOnMedica Tell women IUD more effective for emergency contraception Oral contraceptive use not linked to major birth defects Lithium safe and effective in children with bipolar disorder Most antidepressants ineffective for children (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 29, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Here's why Kitzhaber says Oregon should spend less on health care
Former Gov. John Kitzhaber today shared his prescription for what ails the health care system: too much medical spending, too little on social services. Kitzhaber, the former emergency room doctor who gained national recognition for transforming Oregon’s Medicaid program and creating Coordinated Care Organizations, delivered the keynote address at the 2016 State of Reform Health Policy Conference in downtown Portland. He advocated for a shift i n resources to invest in the social determinants… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 28, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Here's why Kitzhaber says Oregon should spend less on health care
Former Gov. John Kitzhaber today shared his prescription for what ails the health care system: too much medical spending, too little on social services. Kitzhaber, the former emergency room doctor who gained national recognition for transforming Oregon’s Medicaid program and creating Coordinated Care Organizations, delivered the keynote address at the 2016 State of Reform Health Policy Conference in downtown Portland. He advocated for a shift i n resources to invest in the social determinants… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 28, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Hearing Privilege Is One Many People Take For Granted
Many of us can’t hear.  One in eight Americans above the age of 12 has hearing loss in both ears, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. And while approximately 90 percent of deaf children are born to hearing parents, hearing people still lack an understanding and awareness of deaf accessibility challenges and the social isolation surrounding hearing loss.  In honor of the recent Deaf Awareness Week, people on Twitter spoke out about this important issue. Here are 30 powerful Tweets on #HearingPrivilege: #hearingprivilege being able to hear the "lo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Advances in Ambulance Design, Safety & Technology Protect Patients & Providers
We present innovations crafted by the ambulance manufacturers and companies that produce audible, vibrational and visual warning systems, as well as newer, safer, more comfortable and, most importantly, adjustable, seats.  Welcome to the JEMS Special Focus: Ambulance Innovations Designing a Custom-Built Ambulance that Balances Safety and Efficiency Lights and Sirens Improve Safety of Emergency Calls New Ambulance Seating Improves Safety, Size and Functionality Safety Systems Impact the Cost of EMS     (Source: JEMS Operations)
Source: JEMS Operations - September 28, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Source Type: news

Massive Typhoon Hits Eastern China, Taiwan, Killing 5
BEIJING (AP) — A massive typhoon left one person dead in eastern China on Wednesday, a day after killing four and injuring more than 600 in Taiwan, where authorities remained on alert for the possibility of a landslide. Typhoon Megi caused more than $10 million in damage as it swept across Taiwan before weakening into a tropical storm after hitting the coastal city of Quanzhou in China's Fujian province before dawn, Taiwan's weather service said. At its height, it was packing winds of up to 118 kilometers (74 miles) per hour, China's National Meteorological Center said. One person died after several structures collapsed ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 28, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: News Major Incidents Source Type: news

Man Sues Police, Taser over Stun Gun-Induced Heart Attack
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri man is suing an imprisoned police officer convicted of violating his civil rights two years ago, when the officer repeatedly shot him with a stun gun during a traffic stop and gave him a heart attack that he says nearly killed him. Bryce Masters, who was 17 at the time of the September 2014 confrontation with Independence police officer Timothy Runnels, also is suing the Kansas City suburb, its former police chief and Arizona-based Taser International Inc., which made the stun gun and which Masters accuses of marketing a "defective, unreasonably dangerous" product. The lawsuit...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 28, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JIM SUHR, Associated Press Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Trauma Patient Care Source Type: news

Man Sues Police, Taser over Stun Gun-Induced Heart Attack
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri man is suing an imprisoned police officer convicted of violating his civil rights two years ago, when the officer repeatedly shot him with a stun gun during a traffic stop and gave him a heart attack that he says nearly killed him. Bryce Masters, who was 17 at the time of the September 2014 confrontation with Independence police officer Timothy Runnels, also is suing the Kansas City suburb, its former police chief and Arizona-based Taser International Inc., which made the stun gun and which Masters accuses of marketing a "defective, unreasonably dangerous" product. The lawsuit...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 28, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JIM SUHR, Associated Press Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Trauma Patient Care Source Type: news

An Idiot's Guide To Surviving A Heart Attack
I run at 100 miles per hour. One day it comes to a halt. My phone rings -- which always freaks me out. I think my phone is only a camera or a way to demand a car. I look at the screen and the name seems kinda familiar... Ah! It's my literary agent. I believe I speak for all writers when I say that when your agent call s-- wait, that never happens, so never mind.... I answer as if a Scooby Doo goblin might jump out. "Hello..." "I have a new tactic to get you out of your book contract," she says. I'm a former U.S. Marine and wrote a book, The Pink Marine -- we both hated my publisher. He was like dating a nerdy psych...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Congress Agrees to More Zika Funding: Reports
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 -- Long-delayed funding to combat the Zika virus is included in an emergency spending bill designed to keep the U.S. government running through mid-December, according to published reports on Wednesday. The bill would... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 28, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Alarm symptoms missed in bowel cancer emergency patients
One in five bowel cancer patients diagnosed in an emergency had "red flag" symptoms that should have been picked up earlier, says a study in the British Journal of Cancer. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Questions You Must Ask And Get Answered Before You Leave The Hospital
1. What's my diagnosis? It's not always clear to patients why they were in the hospital. And this applies to both visits to the emergency room as well as admissions as an in-patient. You would think doctors would explain why you were admitted but that doesn't always happen. I often see patients who can't tell me why they were in the hospital. They know the symptoms they were experiencing but may not know what the diagnosis was. And there is a big difference between "chest pain" and "heart attack." But it's not your fault -- it's the health care system. With all the typing into the health record, no one talks to the patient...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news