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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 20.

Mechanics Research Communications Elsevier Distinguished LectureEngineering
Professor Howard Baum will present the Mechanics Research Communications Elsevier Distinguished Lecture (sponsored by Elsevier and the NJIT Granular Science Laboratory)in the Guttenberg Information Technologies Center, NJIT, Mon 19 Apr 2010, 11:30 a.m. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - January 26, 2010 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

OSA to launch new journal: Biomedical Optics Express
(Optical Society of America) The Optical Society today announced it is launching a new peer-reviewed journal focusing on biomedical optics and photonics. Biomedical Optics Express will launch this fall with monthly issues, joining OSA's portfolio of 12 peer-reviewed optics journals. Joseph A. Izatt, professor of biomedical engineering at Duke University, will serve as the editor-in-chief. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2010 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FREE ONLINE: A Forensic Analysis of Hurricane Katrina's ImpactEngineering
FREE ONLINE ACCESS FOR 12 MONTHS: Ocean Engineering Special Issue - Volume 37, Issue 1, January 2010, Edited by Z. Demirbilek, D.T. Resio and R.G. Dean. Printed copies can be purchased at https://authororders.elsevier.com (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - January 14, 2010 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

New Protein Function Discovered By Carnegie Mellon's Philip LeDuc
Carnegie Mellon University's Philip R. LeDuc and his collaborators in Massachusetts and Taiwan have discovered a new function of a protein that could ultimately unlock the mystery of how these workhorses of the body play a central role in the mechanics of biological processes in people. "What we have done is find a new function of a protein that helps control cell behavior from a mechanics perspective," said LeDuc, an associate professor of mechanical engineering with courtesy appointments in the Biomedical Engineering, Biological Sciences and Computational Biology departments... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 13, 2010 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

Biomedical Engineer
Interested in becoming a biomedical engineer? If you enjoy biology, engineering, and medicine, a career as a biomedical engineer may be for you. (Source: About.com Health Careers)
Source: About.com Health Careers - January 13, 2010 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: healthcareers.guide at about.com Tags: careers Source Type: news

UT Medical School biomedical engineer Mauro Ferrari elected AAAS Fellow
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Mauro Ferrari, Ph.D., professor and chairman of the Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering (nBME) at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, has been elected a fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. This prestigious honor is awarded for efforts deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 7, 2010 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Electronic Submission for SME JournalsEngineering
The Journal of Manufacturing Systems and the Journal of Manufacturing Processes, official journals of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, are open for online submission via EES at http://ees.elsevier.com/smejms and http://ees.elsevier.com/smejmp (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - January 6, 2010 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Biomedical Engineering Careers
Biomedical engineering is projected to increase by a whopping 72% in the ten year period ending in 2018. This is the fastest rate of growth over just about any occupation, including the 6 Fastest Growing Medical Careers, also projected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, as a relatively small field, with only about 16,000 biomedical engineers currently employed, this amazing rate of growth will "only" result in the addition of about 11,500 new jobs throughout that ten year period. Therefore, while biomedical engineering tops the list of highest growth percentage, it's not near the top of the list in terms of number...
Source: About.com Health Careers - January 3, 2010 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists Study Effects of Crashes on Pregnant Women
Biomedical researchers at the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences recently completed a three-year project that studied how to better protect pregnant women in car accidents. Partly funded by Ford, the study... (Source: OrlandoSentinel: Medical Research)
Source: OrlandoSentinel: Medical Research - December 28, 2009 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Faster, Cheaper DNA Sequencing Method Developed By Boston University Reseachers
Boston University biomedical engineers have devised a method for making future genome sequencing faster and cheaper by dramatically reducing the amount of DNA required, thus eliminating the expensive, time-consuming and error-prone step of DNA amplification. In a study published in the Dec. 20 online edition of Nature Nanotechnology, a team led by Boston University Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor Amit Meller details pioneering work in detecting DNA molecules as they pass through silicon nanopores... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 21, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Springer Adds Cardiovascular Engineering And Technology To Two Other BMES Journals In Publishing Program
Springer and the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) have founded a new journal Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology (CVET). CVET is a forum for research on all aspects of cardiovascular physiology and medical treatment. The first issue of the new quarterly journal will appear in March 2010 and joins two other BMES publications at Springer, Annals of Biomedical Engineering and Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 20, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Springer Adds Cardiovascular Engineering And Technology To Two Other BMES Journals In Publishing Program
Springer and the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) have founded a new journal Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology (CVET). CVET is a forum for research on all aspects of cardiovascular physiology and medical treatment... (Source: Cardiovascular / Cardiology News From Medical News Today)
Source: Cardiovascular / Cardiology News From Medical News Today - December 20, 2009 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Synthetic Platelets Halve Clotting Time
Blood loss is a major cause of death from roadside bombs to freeway crashes. Traumatic injury, the leading cause of death for people age 4 to 44, often overwhelms the body's natural blood-clotting process. In an effort to enhance the natural process, a team led by Erin Lavik, a new Case Western Reserve University biomedical engineering professor, and her former doctoral student, James P. Bertram, built synthetic platelets that show promise in halting internal and external bleeding. Their work is published in Science Translational Medicine... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 18, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Synthetic Platelets Halve Clotting Time
Blood loss is a major cause of death from roadside bombs to freeway crashes. Traumatic injury, the leading cause of death for people age 4 to 44, often overwhelms the body's natural blood-clotting process. In an effort to enhance the natural process, a team led by Erin Lavik, a new Case Western Reserve University biomedical engineering professor, and her former doctoral student, James P... (Source: Public Health News From Medical News Today)
Source: Public Health News From Medical News Today - December 18, 2009 Category: Primary Care Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

New MRI Safety Risk For Patients With Pacemakers Identified By FDA Researchers
FDA researchers have found that certain cardiac pacemakers may inadequately stimulate a patient's heart while undergoing a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan due to the magnetic pulses mixing with the electronic pulses from the pacemaker. This inadequate stimulation is potentially dangerous for the patient undergoing the MRI scan, according to research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BioMedical Engineering Online. MRI is an imaging technique that uses a magnetic field instead of ionizing radiation to produce a detailed image of internal body structures... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 16, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Study: MRI perilous for pacemaker patients
Exposure to an MRI magnetic field can cause unintended cardiac stimulation and considerably alter pulse in patients implanted with pacemakers--conditions that can have potentially devastating consequences--accorindg to research published Dec. 15 in BioMedical Engineering Online. (Source: Health Imaging News)
Source: Health Imaging News - December 15, 2009 Category: Radiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Study: MRI perilous for pacemaker patients
Exposure to an MRI magnetic field can cause unintended cardiac stimulation and considerably alter pulse in patients implanted with pacemakers--conditions that can have potentially devastating consequences--according to research published Dec. 15 in BioMedical Engineering Online. (Source: Cardiovascular Business News)
Source: Cardiovascular Business News - December 15, 2009 Category: Cardiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Biomedical Engineering Society's new journal to be published by Springer
(Springer) Springer and the Biomedical Engineering Society have founded a new journal Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology. CVET is a forum for research on all aspects of cardiovascular physiology and medical treatment. The first issue of the new quarterly journal will appear in March 2010 and joins two other BMES publications at Springer, Annals of Biomedical Engineering and Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2009 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Editor of Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics retires
Professor Gareth McKinley has decided to retire from his position of Editor; which he held for 9 years. Professor Roland Keunings will continue as sole editor of the journal. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - December 14, 2009 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Editor of Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics retiresEngineering
Professor Gareth McKinley has decided to retire from his position of Editor; which he held for 9 years. Professor Roland Keunings will continue as sole editor of the journal. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - December 14, 2009 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

NFL Grant To Strengthen Knee Research
NFL Charities, the charitable foundation of the National Football League, has awarded a grant of $125,000 to UC Davis for research on new ways to repair injured knees. The aim of the work is to engineer new materials to repair the knee meniscus, said Professor Kyriacos Athanasiou, chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. The meniscus is a gel-filled pad that sits between the bones and protects the joint when we run or jump. "The No. 1 surgery for injured NFL players is meniscal repair," Athanasiou said. The grant will run for one year... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 11, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sports Medicine / Fitness Source Type: news

NFL Grant To Strengthen Knee Research
NFL Charities, the charitable foundation of the National Football League, has awarded a grant of $125,000 to UC Davis for research on new ways to repair injured knees. The aim of the work is to engineer new materials to repair the knee meniscus, said Professor Kyriacos Athanasiou, chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering... (Source: Sports Medicine / Fitness News From Medical News Today)
Source: Sports Medicine / Fitness News From Medical News Today - December 11, 2009 Category: Sports Medicine Tags: Sports Medicine / Fitness Source Type: news

New centre using innovative technology to tackle health problems opens at Imperial
The Institute of Biomedical Engineering opens the Winston Wong Centre for Bio-inspired Technology – News (Source: Imperial College News)
Source: Imperial College News - December 11, 2009 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Award for Editor of Automation in Construction
Professor Miroslaw Skibniewski, Editor of Automation in Construction,was awarded Doctor Honoris Causa (honorary doctorate) at a ceremony at Vilnius (Gediminas) Technical University in Vilnius, Lithuania on October 6. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - December 7, 2009 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Award for Editor of Automation in ConstructionEngineering
Professor Miroslaw Skibniewski, Editor of Automation in Construction,was awarded Doctor Honoris Causa (honorary doctorate) at a ceremony at Vilnius (Gediminas) Technical University in Vilnius, Lithuania on October 6. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - December 7, 2009 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

New Technology Captures Tumor Cells from the Bloodstream
Nano-technology Breakthrough May Prevent Cancers from Metastasizing With the goal of removing tumor cells from the bloodstream, a biomedical engineering team at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) in Little Rock has discovered a non-invasive way to identify cancer and to capture tumor cells in the bloodstream. This landmark discovery, could dramatically improve [...] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - December 4, 2009 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: jude Tags: Laboratory News Laboratory Pathology cancer cancer test clinical laboratory contrast imaging dark daily news dark report news diagnosis diagnostic test health care Jin-Woo Kim PhD laser irradiation metastasize nano tech nanom Source Type: news

Studying Simulated Car Crashes Involving Pregnant Women
Although states are not required to report fetal deaths in accident data, between 300 and 1,000 unborn babies die in car accidents each year. This accident fatality rate is about four times the rate for victims between infancy and four years old, said Stefan Duma, head of the Virginia Tech - Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Science (SBES). "There is no silver bullet to solving these problems," Duma added... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 3, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Studying Simulated Car Crashes Involving Pregnant Women
Although states are not required to report fetal deaths in accident data, between 300 and 1,000 unborn babies die in car accidents each year. This accident fatality rate is about four times the rate for victims between infancy and four years old, said Stefan Duma, head of the Virginia Tech - Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Science (SBES)... (Source: IT / Internet / E-mail News From Medical News Today)
Source: IT / Internet / E-mail News From Medical News Today - December 3, 2009 Category: Information Technology Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing
Interdisciplinary Aspects of Vehicle System Dynamics Integration Submission Deadline: 28 February 2010. Visit the Journal homepage for more information: www.elsevier.com/locate/ymssp (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - December 1, 2009 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Mechanical Systems and Signal ProcessingEngineering
Interdisciplinary Aspects of Vehicle System Dynamics Integration Submission Deadline: 28 February 2010. Visit the Journal homepage for more information: www.elsevier.com/locate/ymssp (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - December 1, 2009 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

BME Researcher Builds New Sensor To Distinguish Between Stable Plaque And Heart Attack Plaque
Viterbi School biomedical engineer and cardiologist Tzung John Hsiai hopes to develop a new tool to help clinicians distinguish cardiac emergencies requiring immediate surgery from chronic problems manageable with drugs and lifestyle change. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 26, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

BME Researcher Builds New Sensor To Distinguish Between Stable Plaque And Heart Attack Plaque
Viterbi School biomedical engineer and cardiologist Tzung John Hsiai hopes to develop a new tool to help clinicians distinguish cardiac emergencies requiring immediate surgery from chronic problems manageable with drugs and lifestyle change. Angiograms, images made by catheters inserted into the arteries feeding the heart, offer an inside view of the interior surface ("lumen") of these blood vessels, often revealing deposits of a dangerous fatty substance called plaque. (Source: Cardiovascular / Cardiology News From Medical News Today)
Source: Cardiovascular / Cardiology News From Medical News Today - November 26, 2009 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

TAU's New Biodegradable Fibers Advance Stent Technology And Brain Surgery, Then Disappear
Stents that keep weakened and flabby arteries from collapsing have been true life-savers. But after six months, those stents are no longer needed - once the arteries are strengthened, they become unnecessary. Previously, doctors had no choice but to leave them in place. Prof. Meital Zilberman of Tel Aviv University's Department of Biomedical Engineering has developed a new patent-pending fiber platform that carries drugs where they're needed, then dissolves. (Source: Medical Devices News From Medical News Today)
Source: Medical Devices News From Medical News Today - November 26, 2009 Category: Medical Equipment Tags: Vascular Source Type: news

Translational Research – Where Engineering Meets Medicine
Call for Papers: Special Issue of the Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Journal An International Journal of Manufacturing, Product and Process Development Email of intent deadline: December 11, 2009 Submission Deadline: December 31, 2009 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - November 25, 2009 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Translational Research - Where Engineering Meets Medicine
Call for Papers: Special Issue of the Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Journal An International Journal of Manufacturing, Product and Process Development Email of intent deadline: December 11, 2009 Submission Deadline: December 31, 2009 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - November 25, 2009 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Researchers identify proteins in lung cancer cells that may provide potential drug targets
(Boston University Medical Center) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine and the Boston University Biomedical Engineering Department have identified a number of proteins whose activation allows them to distinguish between cancer and normal cells with almost 97 percent accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2009 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Stable plaque or heart attack plaque? USC researcher builds new sensor to tell which is which
(University of Southern California) Biomedical engineer and cardiologist Tzung "John" Hsiai hopes to develop a new tool to help clinicians distinguish cardiac emergencies requiring immediate surgery from chronic problems manageable with drugs and lifestyle change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 23, 2009 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Engineering Researcher Part Of Team That Discovers How To Capture Tumor Cells In Bloodstream
Jin-Woo Kim, a biomedical engineering researcher at the University of Arkansas, is part of a cutting-edge nanotechnology research group that has discovered a way to capture tumor cells in the bloodstream. The work could dramatically improve early cancer diagnosis and prevent deadly metastasis. The discovery was published Nov. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 18, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Engineering Researcher Part Of Team That Discovers How To Capture Tumor Cells In Bloodstream
Jin-Woo Kim, a biomedical engineering researcher at the University of Arkansas, is part of a cutting-edge nanotechnology research group that has discovered a way to capture tumor cells in the bloodstream. The work could dramatically improve early cancer diagnosis and prevent deadly metastasis. The discovery was published Nov. (Source: Cancer / Oncology News From Medical News Today)
Source: Cancer / Oncology News From Medical News Today - November 18, 2009 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Advanced BioMedical Technologies Inc. Begins Phase II Animal Test On PA Miniscrews And Plates
Advanced BioMedical Technologies Inc. (OTCBB: ABMT) announced that the Company's subsidiary, Shenzhen Changhua Biomedical Engineering Co., Ltd. ("ABT-CHANGHUA"), has signed a cooperative agreement with The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Pharmaceutical University ("GDPU Hospital") in Guangzhou. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 17, 2009 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cosmetic Medicine / Plastic Surgery Source Type: news