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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 13.

TC4PCA 2011 - Registration reminderElsevier Engineering News
The conference is now only a few days away. If you haven't already registered, it is not too late to do so. Go to http://www.tc4pca.elsevier.com (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - September 7, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Tiny Oxygen Generators Boost Effectiveness Of Anticancer Treatment
Researchers have created and tested miniature devices that are implanted in tumors to generate oxygen, boosting the killing power of radiation and chemotherapy. The technology is designed to treat solid tumors that are hypoxic at the center, meaning the core contains low oxygen levels. "This is not good because radiation therapy needs oxygen to be effective," said Babak Ziaie, a Purdue University professor of electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering. "So the hypoxic areas are hard to kill. Pancreatic and cervical cancers are notoriously hypoxic... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 2, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

New Department of Neuroscience chair named at BCM
Dr. Dora E. Angelaki has been named the new chair of the department of neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine. Angelaki is an award winning researcher who comes to BCM from Washington University where she was an alumni endowed professor in the department of anatomy and neurobiology with a joint appointment in biomedical engineering. She will continue her research in multisensory integration necessary for self-motion perception, spatial orientation and the control of movement. "Dr. Angelaki has tremendous energy and a clear vision about how to move the department of neuroscience forward," said Dr. Paul Klotman...
Source: Baylor College of Medicine News - September 1, 2011 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

NIH awards $2.5M to study pulmonary hypertension
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has granted a biomedical engineer $2.5 million to establish how various health factors add up to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). From this, she and her team will develop a way to separate PAH patients who will be helped by regular exercise from those whom it might harm. (Source: Cardiovascular Business News)
Source: Cardiovascular Business News - August 29, 2011 Category: Cardiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Algorithm To Improve Remote Electrocardiography Developed By UT Researchers
Today someone in a remote village in India is able to run an electrocardiogram (ECG) via their smart phone on a loved one having a potential heart attack and send to a doctor in New Delhi for analysis. Mobile technology is already bringing health care to places it has never been able to reach. However, there is still room for error that can lead to misdiagnosis. Xiaopeng Zhao, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is working to eliminate these errors... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 24, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: IT / Internet / E-mail Source Type: news

UT researchers develop algorithm to improve remote electrocardiography
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) Xiaopeng Zhao, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is working to eliminate these errors. Zhao and his team of graduate and undergraduate students and physicians have developed an award-winning algorithm that improves the effectiveness of ECGs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Exmovere Signs ZEONS Global for International Distribution Support
MCLEAN, Va., Aug. 12, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Exmovere Holdings, Inc., a biomedical engineering company listed on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange under the symbol (X3M.F), today announced signing a definitive agreement with ZEONS Global to secure sales and distribution support around the world. The agreement secures agency-level support for all facets of customer contact and development, sales and distribution support, as well as channel-based marketing for Exmovere products. As a starting point in the relationship, ZEONS plans to market and sell evaluation kits for Exmobaby infant pajamas in Latin America, the Middle East, ...
Source: Medical News (via PRIMEZONE) - August 12, 2011 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Human And Mouse Hearts Respond Differently To Two Cardiovascular Drugs: Results Call Into Question Reliance On Animal Models
Anyone who follows science has read enthusiastic stories about medical breakthroughs that include the standard disclaimer that the results were obtained in mice and might not carry over to humans. Much later, there might be reports that a drug has been abandoned because clinical trials turned up unforeseen side effects or responses in humans. Given the delay, most readers probably don't connect the initial success and the eventual failure. But Igor Efimov, PhD, a biomedical engineer at Washington University in St... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 5, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

ICoBT 2011 - Final programme availableElsevier Engineering News
The International Conference on BioTribolgy will take place in London, Imperial College, 18-21 September 2011. To download the full programme or to register, go to http://www.biotribologyconference.com (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - August 5, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Pathogen Research Inspires Robotics Design For Medicine And Military
A pathogen that attacks the small intestines of humans and animals is serving as the inspiration for developing robots that can fight disease and aid in military operations. Mingjun Zhang, associate professor in mechanical, aerospace and biomedical engineering, at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and his team have made significant findings about the swimming and attachment of the microorganism Giardia. Giardia causes one of the most common gastrointestinal diseases in the world, giardiasis... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 4, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Important News: ICEFA V changes venue from Rotterdam to The Hague
ICEFA V - Fifth International Conference on Engineering Failure Analysis - will now be held at Hilton Hotel, The Hague, The Netherlands from 1-4 July 2012 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - August 3, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Miniature lab can diagnose disease in the field [video] | GrrlScientist
In a brilliant cross-pollination of engineering, physics and biology, scientists have developed a credit-card sized device that can diagnose HIV and syphilis in the remotest parts of the world in just minutesPeople who live in the poorest and remotest parts of the developing world often have their lives cut short by disease -- preventable or curable disease. The first essential step to fighting these diseases is correctly identifying them. But in the developing world, disease detection is often prohibitively expensive. In a brilliant cross-pollination of engineering, physics and biology, scientists have developed an afford...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 3, 2011 Category: Science Authors: GrrlScientist Tags: HIV infection Society Health Global development Sexual health Infectious diseases Biochemistry and molecular biology Microbiology Science Africa Rwanda Physics guardian.co.uk Blogposts Source Type: news

Important News: ICEFA V changes venue from Rotterdam to The HagueElsevier Engineering News
ICEFA V - Fifth International Conference on Engineering Failure Analysis - will now be held at Hilton Hotel, The Hague, The Netherlands from 1-4 July 2012 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - August 3, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Portable Lab-On-A-Chip Can Accurately Detect HIV In Less Than 15 Minutes
An easily portable, cheap credit card sized lab-on-a-chip - the mChip - can detect HIV, syphilis and several other infections as accurately as sophisticated hospital-based equipments can. Developer, Samuel K. Sia, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering says the device can be used in the remotest parts of the world. It was tested on hundreds of Rwandan patients and is said to be almost 100% accurate. Sia described it as a microfluidic-based diagnostic device which can carry out complex laboratory assays simply, efficiently and accurately... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 2, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

New Disposable Credit Card-Sized Device Diagnoses Infectious Diseases At Patients' Bedsides, Could Streamline Blood Testing
Samuel K. Sia, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has developed an innovative strategy for an integrated microfluidic-based diagnostic device - in effect, a lab-on-a-chip - that can perform complex laboratory assays, and do so with such simplicity that these tests can be carried out in the most remote regions of the world... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 2, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

In The Battle To Relieve Neck And Back Aches, Researchers Create Bioengineered Spinal Disc Implants
Every year, millions of people contend with lower back and neck discomfort. With intent to ease their pain, Cornell University engineers in Ithaca and doctors at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City have created a biologically based spinal implant that could someday spell relief for these countless sufferers. Lawrence Bonassar, Ph.D., associate professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering, and Roger Härtl, M.D... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 2, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Back Pain Source Type: news

Biomedical Engineering Among Top Paying College Majors
Payscale.com, a salary research and information website, released a list of the most highly compensated college majors, and most were non-medical engineering degrees. However, biomedical engineering did make the list, as the only major representing the healthcare industry....Read Full Post (Source: About.com Health Careers)
Source: About.com Health Careers - July 31, 2011 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Columbia engineering innovative hand-held lab-on-a-chip could streamline blood testing worldwide
(Columbia University) Columbia biomedical engineering professor develops innovative strategy for an integrated microfluidic-based diagnostic device that can perform complex laboratory assays, with such simplicity that these tests can be carried out in the most remote regions of the world. Successfully tested in Rwanda, the mChip diagnoses diseases like HIV and syphilis at patients' bedsides. These are the first published field results to show how microfluidics and nanoparticles can be successfully leveraged to produce a functional low-cost diagnostic device in extreme resource-limited settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

SSJP Students Graduate from BWH, Bound for Success
Student Success Jobs Program (SSJP) graduates Andrew Green and Lydia Alfonso stood before a packed Bornstein Amphitheater last month and shared how the mentoring of the Biomedical Engineering staff has made a difference in their lives. (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - July 22, 2011 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Dates confirmed for the International Conference on Fatigue Damage of Structural Materials IXElsevier Engineering News
The IX International Conference on Fatigue Damage of Structural Materials will take place in Hyannis, MA, USA from 16-21 September 2012. For more information go to www.fatiguedamageconference.com (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - July 19, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Improving Surgical Outcomes For Children, Cancer Patients At UT
Faculty and students at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin are developing ways for cancer patients and children born with facial deformities to make more informed decisions about which reconstructive surgeries would be most aesthetically pleasing and practical based on their individual body types and personal preferences. The interdisciplinary research, which includes biomedical engineering Professor Mia K. Markey and aerospace engineering Professor K... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 14, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cosmetic Medicine / Plastic Surgery Source Type: news

You can now also find the latest engineering news on facebookElsevier Engineering News
To follow us, simply follow the link and like the page. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - July 13, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Poisonous Shrub Provides Natural Pain Relief
An extract of the poisonous shrub Jatropha curcas acts as a strong painkiller and may have a mode of action different from conventional analgesics, such as morphine and other pharmaceuticals. Details of tests are reported in the current issue of the International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. Omeh Yusuf and Ezeja Maxwell of the Micheal Okpara University of Agriculture in Umudike, Nigeria, explain how J. curcas, also known as the "physic nut" is a perennial shrub that grows to 5 meters in height and belongs to the Euphobiaceace family... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 12, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pain / Anesthetics Source Type: news

Natural pain relief from poisonous shrub
(Inderscience Publishers) An extract of the poisonous shrub Jatropha curcas acts as a strong painkiller and may have a mode of action different from conventional analgesics, such as morphine and other pharmaceuticals. Details of tests are reported in the current issue of the International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 11, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

ICEFA V - Fifth International Conference on Engineering Failure AnalysisElsevier Engineering News
Don't miss ICEFA V - taking place in Rotterdam, July 1-4, 2012. Check out our themes and topics. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - July 11, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Just Add Water And ... Treat Brain Cancer
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed a technique that delivers gene therapy into human brain cancer cells using nanoparticles that can be freeze-dried and stored for up to three months prior to use. The shelf-stable particles may obviate the need for virus-mediated gene therapy, which has been associated with safety concerns. The report appears in the August issue of Biomaterials. "Most nonviral gene therapy methods have very low efficacy," says Jordan Green, Ph.D., an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 7, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Bone Loss Prevention Experiment On The Last Space Shuttle Flight
Researchers in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill/North Carolina State University Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering will be at the Kennedy Space Center for the last space shuttle launch of the NASA program as Atlantis departs for its final mission into Earth's orbit. With July 8, 2011 as the target launch date, the UNC/NCSU team led by Ted Bateman, PhD, associate professor in the department, have painstakingly prepared an experiment aboard Atlantis aimed at revealing strategies to protect future astronauts from bone loss during extended exposure to micro-gravity... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 6, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bones / Orthopedics Source Type: news

Bone loss prevention experiment on the last space shuttle flight
(University of North Carolina School of Medicine) Researchers in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill/North Carolina State University Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering will be at the Kennedy Space Center for the last space shuttle launch of the NASA program as Atlantis departs for its final mission into Earth's orbit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 5, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Engineering Structures Journal is pleased to announce REC2012
REC2012 - 5th International Conference on Reliable Engineering Computing June 13-15, 2012 Brno, Czech Republic http://rec2012.fce.vutbr.cz (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 30, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

The Engineering Structures Journal is pleased to announce REC2012Elsevier Engineering News
REC2012 - 5th International Conference on Reliable Engineering Computing June 13-15, 2012 Brno, Czech Republic http://rec2012.fce.vutbr.cz (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 30, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 15 JULY 2011 - Underground Infrastructure Research (UIR) Conference and Trenchless Technology Roadshow 2012Elsevier Engineering News
Municipal, Industrial and Environmental Applications Scotiabank Convention Centre, Niagara Falls, ON, Canada, June 4-6, 2012 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 29, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS DEADLINE: 30 JUNE 2011 - Underground Infrastructure Research (UIR) Conference and Trenchless Technology Roadshow 2012Elsevier Engineering News
Municipal, Industrial and Environmental Applications Scotiabank Convention Centre, Niagara Falls, ON, Canada, June 4-6, 2012 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 29, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

AAMI: Alarm fatigue, IT, interoperability among top 10 biomed challenges
SAN ANTONIO—In an Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) survey, clinical engineers and biomedical engineering technicians named interfacing devices and information systems the top challenge at their hospitals. Also ranked highly as challenging were maintaining computerized IT systems and managing alarm systems. (Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives)
Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives - June 28, 2011 Category: Information Technology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Internationally recognized BME professor to join University of Texas as visiting scholar
(University of Texas at Austin) Professor Ali Khademhosseini, a bioengineer who is internationally regarded for his research and contributions in the area of biomedical microdevices and biomaterials, will join the University of Texas at Austin's Department of Biomedical Engineering as a Donald D. Harrington Fellow and visiting scholar for the fall 2011 semester. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Tiny cell patterns reveal the progression of development and disease
(Columbia University) Researchers at Columbia Engineering School, led by biomedical engineering professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, has developed a new technique to evaluate human stem cells using cell micropatterning -- a simple but powerful in vitro tool that will enable scientists to study the initiation of left-right asymmetry during tissue formation, to diagnose disease, and to study factors that could lead to certain birth defects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 27, 2011 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AAMI: Healthcare technology management dawns as a new profession
SAN ANTONIO—After an intensive two-day forum to better define the evolving role of clinical and biomedical engineering, industry leaders came to the conclusion that healthcare technology management is the new name for the profession, which was explained in a presentation at the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) conference & expo on June 26. (Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives)
Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives - June 26, 2011 Category: Information Technology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

AAMI: Healthcare technology management dawns as a new profession
SAN ANTONIO—After an intensive two-day forum to better define the evolving role of clinical and biomedical engineering, industry leaders came to the conclusion that healthcare technology management is the new name for the profession, which was explained in a presentation at the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) conference & expo on June 26. (Source: Health Imaging News)
Source: Health Imaging News - June 26, 2011 Category: Radiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

The Brain Electric: Deep Brain Stimulation for Neurologic Disorders
Rigid posture, tremor, postural instability, shuffling gait. These are the technical terms you might apply to the man with advancing Parkinson’s disease as he struggles to descend the stairs outside his front door and staggers down his driveway, shoulders hunched, balancing himself precariously between his cane and the car door as he makes his way toward the mailbox at the end of the drive. The same man on the same day, with his brain stimulator turned on, can walk down the stairs while putting on his jacket, step easily into his car, and drive to the post office. If you saw him on the street, you wouldn’t know he was ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 25, 2011 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Neurological Disorders Source Type: news

Patch Work: Building New Heart Tissue -- From Scratch to Patch
Imagine a patch -- made of fully functional cardiac tissue -- that could safely and effectively restore function to heart muscle injured by a heart attack or plagued by an arrhythmia. This is the work of Duke biomedical engineer Nenad Bursac, PhD, and his team in the Cardiac Electrophysiology and Tissue Engineering (CETE) lab. They’re using undifferentiated stem cells to build functioning patches of heart tissue that can directly replace damaged or malfunctioning heart-muscle cells (cardiomyocytes). The work offers a different approach than injecting stem cells into hearts, which is another experimental technique to achi...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 22, 2011 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Heart Services Research Source Type: news

Memory Restored In Rat Model
Scientists have developed a way to turn memories on and off - literally with the flip of a switch. Using an electronic system that duplicates the neural signals associated with memory, they managed to replicate the brain function in rats associated with long-term learned behavior, even when the rats had been drugged to forget. "Flip the switch on, and the rats remember. Flip it off, and the rats forget," said Theodore Berger of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Department of Biomedical Engineering... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 17, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Researchers Measure Blood Pressure With Ultrasound Scanner
"Scientists have for years been looking for a non-invasive method to measure the blood pressure pulses at highly localized points in the body", explains TU/e researcher dr. Nathalie Bijnens of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. "The usual method is to insert a catheter with a pressure sensor. But that's an invasive procedure, and not suitable for preventive diagnostics. There's also the traditional method using an inflatable arm cuff. But that doesn't allow any conclusions to be drawn about for example the blood pressure in the carotid artery... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 15, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

Elsevier Launches new Article of the Future Prototypes
Discipline-specific, three-pane article design in line with the needs of the research community. The prototypes, available in seven disciplines, are based on feedback from researchers with whom Elsevier cooperated throughout the development of the Article of the Future format. The improved format will begin to be applied to SciVerse ScienceDirect towards the end of 2011. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 10, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Promising New Imaging Tech For Diagnosis Of Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes
Researchers have developed a new type of imaging technology to diagnose cardiovascular disease and other disorders by measuring ultrasound signals from molecules exposed to a fast-pulsing laser. The new method could be used to take precise three-dimensional images of plaques lining arteries, said Ji-Xin Cheng, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and chemistry at Purdue University... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 10, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Elsevier Launches new Article of the Future PrototypesInnovation Focus
Discipline-specific, three-pane article design in line with the needs of the research community. The prototypes, available in seven disciplines, are based on feedback from researchers with whom Elsevier cooperated throughout the development of the Article of the Future format. The improved format will begin to be applied to SciVerse ScienceDirect towards the end of 2011. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 10, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

New Imaging Technique Promising for Diagnosing Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes
June 9, 2011 (Purdue University) — Researchers have developed a new type of imaging technology to diagnose cardiovascular disease and other disorders by measuring ultrasound signals from molecules exposed to a fast-pulsing laser. The new method could be used to take precise three-dimensional images of plaques lining arteries, said Ji-Xin Cheng, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and chemistry at Purdue University. read more (Source: Diabetes News from dLife.com)
Source: Diabetes News from dLife.com - June 9, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dlife Source Type: news

Biomedical engineering: All-encompassing degree for lucrative career
Biomedical engineering, or the application of engineering principals to medicine, is continuing to gain traction in both the hospital setting and the classroom, with top universities now offering degrees in the field and experts predicting that the job market will continue to grow at a fast pace. (Source: Health Imaging News)
Source: Health Imaging News - June 7, 2011 Category: Radiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Biomedical engineering: All-encompassing degree for a lucrative career
Biomedical engineering, or the application of engineering principals to medicine, is continuing to gain traction in both the hospital setting and the classroom, with top universities now offering degrees in the field and experts predicting that the job market will continue to grow at a fast pace. (Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives)
Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives - June 7, 2011 Category: Information Technology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Biomedical engineering: All-encompassing degree for a lucrative career
Biomedical engineering, or the application of engineering principals to medicine, is continuing to gain traction in both the hospital setting and the classroom, with top universities now offering degrees in the field and experts predicting that the job market will continue to grow at a fast pace. (Source: Health Imaging News)
Source: Health Imaging News - June 7, 2011 Category: Radiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Stem Cell Treatment May Offer Option For Broken Bones That Don't Heal
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have shown in an animal study that transplantation of adult stem cells enriched with a bone-regenerating hormone can help mend bone fractures that are not healing properly. The UNC study team led by Anna Spagnoli, MD, associate professor of pediatrics and biomedical engineering, demonstrated that stem cells manufactured with the regenerative hormone insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) become bone cells and also help the cells within broken bones repair the fracture, thereby speeding the healing... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 7, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bones / Orthopedics Source Type: news