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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory.

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer
Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) present a new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. In the journal Nature Communications the team, led by biomedical engineer Maarten Merkx, describes how it has developed the first DNA computer capable of detecting several antibodies in the blood and performing subsequent calculations based on this input. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer
(Eindhoven University of Technology) Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology present a new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. Led by biomedical engineer Maarten Merkx the team developed the first DNA computer capable of detecting several antibodies in the blood and performing subsequent calculations based on this input. This is an important step towards the development of smart, 'intelligent' drugs that may allow better control of medication with fewer side-effects and at lower cost. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery
(Children's National Health System) The cutting-edge biocompatible near-infrared 3-D tracking system used to guide the suturing in the first smart tissue autonomous robot (STAR) surgery has the potential to improve manual and robot-assisted surgery and interventions through unobstructed 3-D visibility and enhanced accuracy, according to a study published in the March 2017 issue of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers develop device that emulates human kidney function
(Binghamton University) Instead of running tests on live kidneys, researchers at Binghamton, University State University of New York have developed a model kidney for working out the kinks in medicines and treatments.Developed by Assistant Professor Gretchen Mahler and Binghamton biomedical engineering alumna Courtney Sakolish Ph.D. '16, the reusable, multi-layered and microfluidic device incorporates a porous growth substrate, with a physiological fluid flow, and the passive filtration of the capillaries around the end of a kidney, called the glomerulus, where waste is filtered from blood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Dish: Katie Button
Growing up in New Jersey, Katie Button was a serious student, going on to earn a master's degree in biomedical engineering and entering a PhD program. But she soon discovered her heart was in the kitchen. She was chosen for an internship at Spain's famous "El Bulli." She went on to open "Curate" and "Nightbell" in Asheville, North Carolina. Button joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to share her culinary journey and signature dishes. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to go from idea to commercialization: Interview with Dr. Marie Johnson, Founder of AUM Cardiovascular
Welcome to the Medsider interview series, a regular feature at MassDevice. All interviews are conducted by Scott Nelson, Founder of Medsider and Group Director for WCG. We hope you enjoy them! More than a decade ago, AUM Cardiovascular founder Dr. Marie Johnson was a doctoral student when tragedy struck her and her family. Her husband, Rob, passed away suddenly at the age of 41. He had blockages in his coronary arteries including a ruptured plaque in the left anterior descending artery supplying a large part of the heart muscle. At that time, Dr. Johnson had been working on a prototype device to listen to heart sounds a...
Source: Mass Device - February 2, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog johnson medsider Source Type: news

Media registration now open for 'Bio in Beer-Sheva, Israel: The Murray Fromson Journalism Fellowship'
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) This year, the Fromson Fellowship cohort will offer up to 10 selected science, health and medical journalists the opportunity to report on the myriad biomedical research projects and innovations that are being developed at or in partnership with BGU. Meetings will be held with top researchers and business leaders in the fields of biomedical engineering, robotics, nanomedicine, infectious diseases, sleep and nutrition, who will present new and soon-to-be-published research. Click here for the detailed preliminary itinerary. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The beating heart of solar energy
(Springer) Using solar cells placed under the skin to continuously recharge implanted electronic medical devices is a viable one. Swiss researchers have done the math, and found that a 3.6 square centimeter solar cell is all that is needed to generate enough power during winter and summer to power a typical pacemaker. The study, led by Lukas Bereuter of Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern, is published in Springer's journal Annals of Biomedical Engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers develop nanosensor to differentiate cancer cells and healthy cells in surgery
Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have developed a threshold nanosensor that can differentiate between cancerous cells and healthy tissue during surgery. The team’s work was published in Nature Biomedical Engineering.  “We synthesized an imaging probe that stays dark in normal tissues but switches on like a light bulb when it reaches solid tumors. The purpose is to allow surgeons to see tumors better during surgery,” co-senior author Jinming Gao said in prepared remarks. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Researchers develop n...
Source: Mass Device - December 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diagnostics Oncology Research & Development Surgical University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Source Type: news

How Can Wearable Technology Improve Cancer Treatment?
How can wearable technology improve cancer treatment? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Keck Medicine of USC, 500+ internationally renowned doctors at a leading academic medical center, on Quora: Current cancer treatment is based on episodic encounters. Even during chemotherapy, patients generally see their physician for maybe eight to ten minutes every three weeks, said Peter Kuhn, ATOM-HP's co-lead researcher and a professor of medicine, biomedical engineering, and aerospace and mechanical engineering at the U...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Person of the Year 2016 Runner-Up: The CRISPR Pioneers
[time-ad size=”large”] Table of ContentsPerson of the Year THE CHOICE DONALD TRUMP The Short List HILLARY CLINTON THE HACKERS RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN THE CRISPR PIONEERS BEYONCÉ Plus EUROPE’S POPULIST REVOLT ARE PRESIDENTS ALWAYS POY? 90 YEARS OF POY BY ALICE PARK Dr. Carl June’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania looks like any other biology research hub. There are tidy rows of black-topped workbenches flanked by shelves bearing boxes of pipettes and test tubes. There’s ad hoc signage marking the different workstations. And there are postdocs buzzing around, calibrating scale...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: person of the year POY Source Type: news

Modification to delivery polymer sidesteps allergic response
Researchers from Duke University have reconfigured the popular drug-delivery polymer, polyethylene glycol, to sidestep dangerous immune responses that have previously halted clinical trials at Duke. The team’s work was published in Nature Biomedical Engineering. Polyethylene glycol, PEG, is a polymer that is found in toothpaste and cosmetics, but is often used in pharmaceuticals. It can be attached to active drugs in the bloodstream, thus slowing the body’s ability to clear them and lengthening the duration that the drug can be useful. But because this polymer is so widely used, many people have developed anti...
Source: Mass Device - December 1, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Duke University Source Type: news

Hemosep: the machine set to revolutionise blood transfusions
A new medical device that give a patient ’s own blood back to them could, its makers say, save lives and money, and is already being used around the world. So why isn’t the NHS buying any of them?The idea of being able to recover a patient ’s own blood and put it back into their body is not new. But until now it has been expensive and largely unworkable. Autotransfusion, as it is known, has typically used large, complex, centrifugal devices that require skilled operators, take a lot of time and are very expensive. The cumbersome mac hines used in many hospitals return just the red blood cells, eliminating the platele...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 28, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Joan McFadden Tags: Health & wellbeing Medical research Healthcare industry Life and style Hospitals Science Source Type: news

Researchers find potential therapy for brain swelling during concussion
A team of biomedical engineering researchers has identified a cause of fluid swelling of the brain, or cellular edema, that occurs during a concussion. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Research Data Management Best Practices and REDCap
Join us in the new Translational Research and Information Lab (TRAIL) Idea Incubator Space on the second floor of the University of Washington Health Sciences Library to watch the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) online Webinar, “Research Data Management Best Practices and REDCap.” The one hour webinar starts at 11:00 am Pacific Time on December 7, 2016. “This webinar will begin with a short description of best practices for consideration in any research data collection/management plan. Once this information is covered, the webinar will transition to a demonstration and discussion ...
Source: Dragonfly - November 21, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Data News From NN/LM PNR Training & Education Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for November 14, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Final FDA rules clarify adverse event reporting for contract manufacturers The FDA last week issued final guidance for medical device companies on the requirements for reporting adverse events that walked back much of the burde...
Source: Mass Device - November 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Sofregen buys Allergan ’ s Seri surgical scaffold
Sofregen Medical said today that it bought the Seri surgical scaffold from Allergan (NYSE:AGN) for an undisclosed amount. Polaris Partners and other investors provided financing for the acquisition, according to the Medford, Mass.-based company. Seri, which is approved by the FDA for use as soft tissue support in plastic and reconstructive surgical procedures, is the only approved silk-based surgical mesh on the market. Allergan acquired the technology when it bought Serica Technologies in 2010, a spinout from Tuft University’s biomedical engineering lab run by David Kaplan and Fiorenzo Omenetto. “Silk has p...
Source: Mass Device - November 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Materials Testing Regenerative Medicine Surgical Allergan Inc. Serica Technologies Sofregen Medical Source Type: news

RIT awarded $1.8 million NIH grant to develop ultrathin membranes for tissue engineering
(Rochester Institute of Technology) Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology are advancing tissue engineering through new work in developing improved porous membranes that will be the 'scaffolds,' or foundational structures, for in vitro tissue models. Thomas Gaborski, assistant professor of biomedical engineering in RIT's Kate Gleason College of Engineering, was awarded a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop 'Transparent ultrathin nano-membranes for barrier cell models and novel co-cultures systems.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 31, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

‘ Connectosomes ’ efficiently deliver chemo to targeted cells
Researchers have developed a new form of nanoparticles called “connectosomes” that can efficiently deliver chemotherapy to human cells more efficiently than traditional delivery methods, according to a report out of the University of Texas at Austin. The team, who published their research in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, equipped the connectosomes with gap junctions to create direct channels that could be used to deliver chemotherapy to individual cells. “Gap junctions are the cells’ mechanism for sharing small molecules between neighboring cells. We believed that there must be a way to uti...
Source: Mass Device - October 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Oncology Research & Development Source Type: news

Clean water-treatment option targets sporadic outbreaks
(University of Cincinnati) Environmental and biomedical engineer David Wendell, an associate professor in the University of Cincinnati's College of Engineering and Applied Science, developed a protein-based photocatalyst that uses light to generate hydrogen peroxide to eliminate E. coli, Listeria, and potentially protozoa like giardia and cryptosporidium from drinking water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

You May Need to Replace Your Sunglasses More Often Than You Think
By Amanda MacMillan Even if you love your current sunglasses, you still might need a new pair of shades. It seems sunglasses' UV protection may deteriorate over time, and current industry tests are not sufficient for determining how long it's safe to wear them, according to a study from Brazil. Most Brazilians wear the same pair every day for about two years, the study notes, yet it has not been proven that lenses maintain the same level of protection after that type of exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The findings may have implications for the sunglass industry in the United States, as well. There is no current recomm...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH announces winners of public-private undergraduate biomedical engineering design competition
Teams designed devices targeting health care problems and underserved communities. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - August 23, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH announces winners of undergraduate biomedical engineering design competition
(NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging& Bioengineering) In a nation-wide competition, six teams of undergraduate engineering students produced prize-winning designs for technological advances to improve human health. The Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) Challenge winning teams designed tools for a myriad of health care challenges, including diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in children and a safer alternative for central venous catheter placements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 23, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Louisiana Tech University professor receives NSF grant to advance brain research
(Louisiana Tech University) The National Science Foundation has awarded a team led by Dr. Leonidas Iasemidis, the Rhodes Eminent Scholar Chair and professor of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech University, a $6 million grant over four years to investigate the origins and impacts of brain seizures associated with epilepsy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

UH biomedical engineer pursues nerve regeneration
(University of Houston) Injuries and certain degenerative diseases -- including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis -- can disrupt the nervous system, posing a challenge for scientists seeking ways to repair the damage. A biomedical engineer from the University of Houston will use a $1.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to determine how best to spur nerve regeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

InVivo Therapeutics Q2 meets the street, shares stay steady
InVivo Therapeutics (NSDQ:NVIV) shares stayed steady after the company released 2nd quarter earnings that met the street on losses per share. The Cambridge, Mass.-based company reported losses of $5.2 million, or 16¢ per share, for the 3 months ended June 30, 2016. That amounts to a 50% reduction in losses for InVivo Therapeutics compared with same period in 2015. After adjusting to exclude 1-time items, losses per share were 18¢, a good tick below what analysts on Wall Street were looking for with expectations set fro losses of 22¢ per share. “The 2nd quarter was one marked by continued advancements and outreach...
Source: Mass Device - August 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Neurological Spinal InVivo Therapeutics Corp. Source Type: news

Award supports UTSA professor's efforts to freeze aneurysms and save lives
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Ender Finol, associate professor of biomedical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has been honored with the American Heart Association's Collaborative Sciences Award. The award includes a $750,000 grant to continue his aneurysm research, which involves 'freezing' aortic aneurysms before they burst and cause serious damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Supercharge career skills at the AMA Research Symposium
Each fall physicians in training have a chance to spotlight their research projects before leaders of the medical community. Find out how the AMA Research Symposium can boost your visibility, build your CV and expand your network. Last year ’s symposium winners also offer tips for competitors. Symposium participants compete for cash prizes and benefit from the chance to present their findings before experts in their fields. The symposium takes place Nov. 11-12 during the 2016 AMA Interim Meeting at Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort in Orlando. Build credibility, polish your CV Discussing your research befo...
Source: AMA Wire - July 27, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

'Big Data' Study Discovers Earliest Sign of Alzheimer's Development
Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital have used a powerful tool to better understand the progression of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), identifying its first physiological signs. Led by Dr. Alan Evans, a professor of neurology, neurosurgery and biomedical engineering at the Neuro, the researchers analyzed more than (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - July 14, 2016 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

'Big Data' study discovers earliest sign of Alzheimer's development
(McGill University) Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital have used a powerful tool to better understand the progression of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), identifying its first physiological signs. Led by Dr. Alan Evans, a professor of neurology, neurosurgery and biomedical engineering at the Neuro, the researchers analyzed more than 7,700 brain images from 1,171 people in various stages of Alzheimer's progression using a variety of techniques including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Feet Operated Game Controller for Upper-limb Amputees
Novel controller allows video gamer who lacks hands to compete with his feet - device for upper-limb amputees earns honors for biomedical engineering grad students (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - June 29, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: Games and Gaming Source Type: news

[Policy Forum] Capitalizing on convergence for health care
For decades, scientists have called for more collaboration between the life and physical sciences, and in the past 5 years, we have been among those calling for a new national research strategy—one we call “convergence”—that would integrate engineering, physical, computational, and mathematical sciences with biomedical science (1). Thanks to the accelerating pace of biological discovery, the expanding power of computation, and a new focus in engineering on biocompatible materials and nanotechnology, the potential of such a strategy for advances in health care is greater than ever (see the photo). Technologies emerg...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 23, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Phillip Sharp Tags: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

This Secretive Startup Is Revolutionizing Scientific Research
As a frustrated biomedical engineering student, Max Hodak came up with one idea that could "shake up science" itself. His idea was simple but ambitious: to revolutionize the way basic science research is done by making it cheaper, faster and more accessible. To Hodak, this means bypassing the drudgery of repetitive lab work and letting scientists focus on the intellectual work behind scientific discoveries. This idea culminated into the Google Ventures-backed, $14-million-funded "robotics cloud laboratory" Transcriptic, whose warehouse in Menlo Park, California houses robots that perform life sciences experiments. Th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Face of the future
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) A new technique developed at Columbia Engineering by Biomedical Engineering Professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic repairs large bone defects in the head and face by using lab-grown living bone, tailored to the patient and the defect being treated. This is the first time researchers have grown living bone grown to precisely replicate the original anatomical structure, using autologous stem cells derived from a small sample of the recipient's fat. (Science Translational Medicine 6/15) (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Research targets corneal disease through imaging, analysis
(University of Houston) A biomedical engineer at the University of Houston is developing new techniques to map the structural integrity of the human cornea, work that could lead to more effective therapies for degenerative corneal disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Peter S. Conti, M.D., Ph.D., receives SNMMI 2016 Paul C. Aebersold Award
(Society of Nuclear Medicine) Peter S. Conti, M.D., Ph.D., FACNP, FACR, professor of radiology, pharmaceutical sciences and biomedical engineering, and director of the Molecular Imaging Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, has been named the 2016 recipient of the prestigious Paul C. Aebersold Award. Conti was presented the award by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging during its annual meeting, held June 11-15 in San Diego, Calif. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Sunrise Labs welcomes Doug Browne and Dave Hibbard to the team
Sunrise Labs, an ISO-13485 certified medical device product development firm in Auburn, NH, is proud to announce the addition of two engineers in leadership roles; Doug Browne, Director of Mechanical Engineering & Design Transfer and Dave Hibbard, Program Manager. Doug Browne has over 25 years of experience in medical device, bio-technology and mechanical system product development focusing on mechanical design, plastics, and design transfer. As technical lead for development and launch of over ten major new products, Doug is recognized as an innovative and award winning product designer. He has particular expertise in...
Source: Mass Device - June 6, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Sunrise Labs Source Type: news

New knee band 'could help measure sounds inside the joint'
Scientists in the US have taken the first step towards creating a new knee band that could monitor the health of the joint by listening to and analysing the sounds it makes during movement.The device remains in an early stage of development at the Georgia Institute of Technology, but could potentially be used in future to assess damage after an injury and track the progress of a patient's recovery.Potential benefits The new knee band is equipped with microphones and vibration sensors that are used to listen to and measure the sounds inside the joint, including the grinding, cracking and popping sounds that often occur ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 26, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Partnerships and the pursuit of innovation at large and small companies
Anne Sissel, managing director of Baxter Ventures and Adam Berman, CEO of TVA Medical, Inc. shared their perspectives on topics related to innovation and partnership between large, commercial organizations and small, venture-backed start-ups. Anne E. Sissel, M.B.A., C.F.A. is managing director of Baxter Ventures and has been in that role since she joined the company in 2014. She previously served as a member of the founding team and vice president, head of finance and business development at Veracyte, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company. Prior to Veracyte, Anne was an investment banker with Goldman, Sachs & Co. and c...
Source: Mass Device - May 19, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Baxter International TVA Medical Source Type: news

Paul Krebsbach named new dean of UCLA Dentistry
University of Michigan Dr. Paul Krebsbach Dr. Paul Krebsbach, one of the nation’s leading researchers in tissue engineering and stem cell biology and a respected academic leader, has been appointed dean of the UCLA School of Dentistry. Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Scott Waugh announced today that Krebsbach will become the eighth dean of UCLA Dentistry, effective June 30. He will succeed Dr. No-Hee Park, who has served as dean since 1998 and is returning to teaching and research. Krebsbach has been a member of the faculty at the University of Michigan since 1996. He is the Roy H. Roberts Professor of Dentistry a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 18, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Bioengineered Blood Vessel Appears Safe for Dialysis Patients
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 6:30 p.m. (ET) on Thursday, May 12, 2016. DURHAM, N.C. – Man-made blood vessels developed by researchers at Duke University, Yale University and the tissue engineering company Humacyte appear to be both safe and more durable than commonly used synthetic versions in patients undergoing kidney dialysis, the researchers report. The findings, published May 12 in The Lancet, resulted from a phase 2 study among 60 patients with kidney failure who required dialysis, which often requires a synthetic graft w...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 13, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Children in Low and Middle Income Countries: What do we really know?
Learning and Individual Differences, Volume 46, pages 1-70 (Publication: February 2016) Edited by Elena Grigorenko (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 6, 2016 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

UNC spinout with 'stunning' science could revolutionize cancer diagnostics
In the UNC-Chapel Hill departments of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry, Professor Steven A. Soper and his team have been developing new ways to diagnose diseases. His work could one day allow doctors to better manage many more cancer diseases than they currently can do today using a diagnostic test no more invasive than a simple blood test. For example, the test will allow for doctors to prescribe correct medicines to cancer patients to help realize precision medicine – a recent initiative… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 21, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jason deBruyn Source Type: news

Louisiana Tech University students recognized for 'green' research
(Louisiana Tech University) Renata Minullina and Abhishek Panchal, biomedical engineering graduate students from Louisiana Tech University and the Institute for Micromanufacturing (IfM), have won the prestigious Poster Presentation Award at the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering Division of the 251st National American Chemical Society (ACS) Meeting held recently in San Diego, California. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 7, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical College of Wisconsin, Marquette collaborate on biomedical program
Marquette University and the Medical College of Wisconsin will collaborate on a joint educational organization for engineers, scientists and physicians. The two institutions said the initiative is called the Medical College of Wisconsin Biomedical Engineering Department. It will include Marquette’s engineering education and research and the Medical College’s medical research, technology and clinical experience, the schools said. Marquette’s biomedical engineering department will expand to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 28, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rich Kirchen Source Type: news

UCF creates 3 new degrees to meet local workforce demand
Two new master's degrees and one new bachelor's degree are coming to the University of Central Florida to help meet the local workforce demand. They include a master of science in biomedical engineering, a master of science in data analytics and a bachelor of science in entertainment management. UCF's board of trustees approved the creation of the three new degrees at a March 24 meeting. Here's a breakdown of each new degree: Biomedical engineering: This will teach students about the development… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rachel Williams Source Type: news

Microneedle patch delivers localized cancer immunotherapy to melanoma
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a technique that uses a patch embedded with microneedles to deliver cancer immunotherapy treatment directly to the site of melanoma skin cancer. In animal studies, the technique more effectively targeted melanoma than other immunotherapy treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Microneedle patch delivers localized cancer immunotherapy to melanoma
(North Carolina State University) Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a technique that uses a patch embedded with microneedles to deliver cancer immunotherapy treatment directly to the site of melanoma skin cancer. In animal studies, the technique more effectively targeted melanoma than other immunotherapy treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New paradigm in medicine: population health — a Q&A with Dr. Brita Roy
Dr. Brita Roy started her career in biomedical engineering, focusing on problems such as how to develop better artificial hearts or drugs. But with a desire to work more directly with patients, she switched to medicine where she started to see that the advanced medical technologies she’d studied as an engineer would have little impact if patients did not learn how to manage their own health and well-being. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 11, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

Louisiana Tech University, LSUHSC to host biomedical engineering conference
(Louisiana Tech University) Louisiana Tech University is joining forces with LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport to bring together biomedical researchers and experts from across the nation at the 32nd Annual Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference (SBEC 2016), March 11-13 at the Shreveport Convention Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news