Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory.

Volunteers needed for the Biology Big Top summer events!
Get out of the lecture theatre/lab/hospital for a day of fun, interactive science– an opportunity to increase awareness about your work, whilst adding science communication experience to your CV! The Society for Endocrinology is looking for volunteers from all career stages to help out at two different events taking place this summer:Lancashire Science Festival - This event explores all things STEM during a three-day event in Central Lancashire which hosted over 200 events last year.Where:The University of Central Lancashire’s Preston CampusWhen:29 June– 1 July 2017Lambeth Country Show - Being...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 29, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Diabetes drug could be the first to reverse the disease
According to a new study published inNature Chemical Biology,a novel daily drug can reverse diabetes symptoms in mice.New Scientist (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 29, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Are you sitting comfortably? Then we'll begin the evolutionary 'fairytale' of coral
Science storytelling could be the way forward for science communication, so for your edification here ’s the story of the Three Little Corals ...Science and storytelling don ’t seem like obvious bedfellows but recently there’s been a serious vein of science communication research that suggests a strong narrative can help withdissemination,understanding by nonexperts and number one for most publishing scientists,citations. Of course,sciencing the art of storytelling, with narrativity indices and reader appeal charts does sound typically soul-suckingly dry, but it is at the heart of the science communication movement a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mark Carnall Tags: Science Fossils Evolution Biology Coral Marine life Source Type: news

New computer program detects cancer by blood sampling
FINDINGSUCLA researchers, working with colleagues at the University of Southern California, have developed a computer program to detect cancer based on chemical modification of DNA circulating in blood. The program belongs to the first diagnostics of this kind to predict what tissue the modified DNA came from. In a test to detect three cancer types, the computer program, known as CancerLocator, outperformed two common approaches and was superior in detecting cancer in blood samples containing low levels of target DNA, which reflect early-stage disease.BACKGROUNDRecent molecular advances have raised the possibility of detec...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists discover new category of analgesic drugs that may treat neuropathic pain
This study has also revealed the existence of a platelet alleviating factor (PAF) pain loop, suggesting a possible role for PAF-receptor antagonists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Genome editing in human cells: Expert group publishes Leopoldina discussion paper
Discussion Paper. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for March 28, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. 3D model of female reproductive system could help test drugs for efficacy, safety In January last year, the National Institutes of Health issued a new requirement for grant funding in basic science: Researchers must discuss how...
Source: Mass Device - March 28, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

3D model of female reproductive system could help test drugs for efficacy, safety
In January last year, the National Institutes of Health issued a new requirement for grant funding in basic science: Researchers must discuss how gender as a biological variable will impact their research. Teresa Woodruff, director of the Women’s Health Research Institute at Northwestern University, told Drug Delivery Business News that this helped support their effort to develop a model that could eventually serve as a way for pharmaceutical companies to consider female biology when developing drugs. Woodruff, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Draper Laboratory worked collaboratively on an NI...
Source: Mass Device - March 28, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Stem Cells Women's Health Draper Laboratories National Institutes of Health (NIH) Northwestern University University of Illinois at Chicago Source Type: news

World's largest dinosaur footprints discovered in Western Australia
Newly-discovered prints left by gigantic herbivores are part of a rich collection of tracks belonging to an estimated 21 different types of dinosaurThe largest known dinosaur footprints have been discovered in Western Australia, including 1.7 metre prints left by gigantic herbivores.Until now, the biggest known dinosaur footprint was a 106cm track discovered in the Mongolian desert andreported last year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin and agencies Tags: Dinosaurs Science Evolution Australia news Fossils Biology Source Type: news

Cross-border surrogacy: exploiting low income women as biological resources?
Our globalised economy responds voraciously to biotech advances, but lax regulation risks turning the poor into biological resources to be used for profit“Look at us, here! We are creating the world of tomorrow!” exclaims Mike. His words bounce off the walls of the high-tech fertility clinic we are in. Outside, the sun is slowly sinking into the smog of New Delhi’s skyline as the streets fill with commuters. The brutal socio-economic inequality between the haves and the have-nots of India’s economic miracle is laid bare in rush hour traffic. Shiny luxury cars, taking wealthy businessmen from high-rise offices to pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elo Luik Tags: Surrogacy Science Reproduction Reproductive rights (developing countries) Global development Biology Inequality and development Parents and parenting Social sciences Source Type: news

From synthetic biology to global health challenges
The University of Bristol is at the forefront of synthetic biology research, teaching and innovation. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 28, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Institutes, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

Study: Dust helps regulate Sierra Nevada ecosystems
(University of California - Merced) A new study released March 28 in the journal Nature Communications indicates it's important to understand how dust helps vegetation thrive, especially in light of the changing climate and land-use intensification. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoias
(University of California - Riverside) Dust from as far away as the Gobi Desert in Asia is providing more nutrients than previously thought for plants, including giant sequoias, in California's Sierra Nevada mountains, a team of scientists, including several from the University of California, Riverside, have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Flying syringes' could detect emerging infectious diseases
(eLife) Blood-sucking flies can act as 'flying syringes' to detect emerging infectious diseases in wild animals before they spread to humans, according to research published in the journal eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Key research priorities for agricultural microbiomes identified
(PLOS) A coordinated effort to understand plant microbiomes could boost plant health and agricultural productivity, according to a new Perspective publishing March 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Posy Busby of Oregon State University in Corvallis and colleagues at eight other research institutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation
(University of Hawaii at Manoa) New research from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa reveals a large part of the heavily urbanized area of Honolulu and Waikiki, Hawai'i is at risk of groundwater inundation--flooding that occurs as groundwater is lifted above the ground surface due to sea level rise. A newly-developed computer model simulates future flood scenarios in the urban core as sea level rises three feet, as is projected for this century under certain climate change scenarios. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tiny bacterium provides window into whole ecosystems
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT research on Prochlorococcus, the most abundant life form in the oceans, shows the bacteria's metabolism evolved in a way that may have helped trigger the rise of other organisms, to form a more complex marine ecosystem with overall greater biomass. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Highway to health: WSU findings point way to more nutritious crops
(Washington State University) Washington State University researchers have had the closest look yet at the inner workings of a plant's circulatory system. Their findings show how nutrients get from the leaves, where they are produced through photosynthesis, to 'sinks' that can include the fruits and seeds we eat and the branches we process for biofuels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fighting world hunger: Robotics aid in the study of corn and drought tolerance
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Developing drought tolerant corn that makes efficient use of available water will be vital to sustain the estimated 9 billion global population by 2050. In March 2014, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded the University of Missouri a $20 million grant as part of a multi-institutional consortium to study how corn maintains root growth during drought conditions. Using funding from the NSF, Mizzou engineers on a multidisciplinary team have developed a robotic system that is changing the way scientists study crops and plant composition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dust contributes valuable nutrients to Sierra Nevada forest ecosystems
(National Science Foundation) Dust from as close as California's Central Valley and as far away as Asia's Gobi Desert provides nutrients, especially phosphorus, to vegetation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, a team of scientists has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

It's not too late to conserve water resources in rapidly urbanizing areas
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) As climate change and population pressure intensify in suburbia, a new study by watershed scientist Timothy Randhir at UMass Amherst suggests that threats such as water shortages and poor quality can be met if managers begin to act now. 'A lot of studies in hydrology climate science focus on climate, but very few combine the two, land use and its synergy with climate change.' He modeled how this watershed is going to look in the next 90 years taking both into account. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cornering endangered species
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Geographic areas occupied by certain species shrink as they decline in abundance, leaving them more vulnerable to extinction by harvest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

It is easier for a DNA knot...
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) How can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of biological systems? This is the fascinating question addressed by Antonio Suma and Cristian Micheletti, researchers at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste who used computer simulations to investigate the options available to the genetic material in such situations. The study has just been published in PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hair spacing keeps honeybees clean during pollination
(Georgia Institute of Technology) A honeybee can carry up to 30 percent of its body weight in pollen because of the strategic spacing of its nearly three million hairs. The gap between each eye hair is approximately the same size as a grain of dandelion pollen, which is typically collected by bees. This keeps the pollen suspended above the eye and allows the forelegs to comb through and collect the particles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MSU, Shedd Aquarium partnering to create healthier aquatic homes
(Michigan State University) Viruses are the most abundant living organisms on the planet, yet we know very little about them, especially in aquatic environments. Michigan State University's Joan Rose is partnering with Shedd Aquarium in Chicago to better understand how viruses affect plants, fish and aquatic mammals in human-built and controlled aquariums. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Discovery of a new regulatory protein provides new tool for stem cell engineering
(University of California - San Diego) Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have discovered a protein that regulates the switch of embryonic stem cells from the least developed 'na ï ve' state to the more developed 'primed' state. This discovery sheds light on stem cell development at a molecular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Forests fight global warming in ways more important than previously understood
(Ohio State University) Trees impact climate by regulating the exchange of water and energy between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere, an important influence that should be considered as policymakers contemplate efforts to conserve forested land, said the authors of an international study that appears in the journal Nature Climate Change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New report finds EPA's controlled human exposure studies of air pollution are warranted
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) A new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine finds these studies are warranted and recommends that they continue under two conditions: when they provide additional knowledge that informs policy decisions and regulation of pollutants that cannot be obtained by other means, and when it is reasonably predictable that the risks for study participants will not exceed biomarker or physiologic responses that are of short duration and reversible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

About time! Predicting midge seasonality key to reducing livestock diseases
(Centre for Ecology& Hydrology) Ecologists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology& Hydrology (CEH) have led a study which informs optimal strategies for control of devastating midge-borne diseases like bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus that affect cattle and sheep in the UK and beyond. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Herpes STDs: From chimps to humans to cold sore cousin mixing before worldwide spread
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Evolutionarily, Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 are considered cousins, and are thought to have evolved independently, Now, an entirely new picture is emerging. While scientists did not find evidence of chimpanzee herpes virus fragments in HSV-2 genomes, they show the history of HSV-2 was marked by recombination with HSV-1. In addition, they determined two main lineages of HSV-2, one globally distributed and another restricted to sub-Saharan Africa, which both started diversifying about 30,000 years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 28, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cell biology: The quickest route to the tip for protein transport
According to a new theoretical model, in cell protrusions and cargo-transporting motor proteins often get in each other ' s way. The upshot is that freely diffusing proteins reach the leading edge faster. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fruit foraging in primates may be key to large brain evolution
Findings support view that big brains have evolved from diet rather than long-held theory it is due to social interactionForaging for fruit may have driven the evolution of large brains in primates, according to research attempting to unpick the mystery of our cerebral heftiness.The finding appears to be a blow to a long-held theory that humans and other primates evolved big brains largely as a result ofsocial pressures, with extra brain power needed to navigate and engage in complex social interactions. Instead the researchers say it supports the view that the evolution of larger brains is driven by diet.Continue reading....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Evolution Primatology Fruit Biology Science UK news Source Type: news

Are Devon ’s road-wrecking badgers a match for the German cows who blew up a barn?
Badger tunnels under a road in Braunton have been blamed for a road collapsing. They ’ve got some work to do before they belong in this rogue’s gallery of chaos-causing creaturesWe are destroying their homes and their kin so it was, perhaps, only a matter of time before the animals started fighting back. Until evolution gives them opposable thumbs, they have to use whatever nature has equipped them with. In the case of badgers, this means digging. Perhaps sickened by the numbers killed on Britain ’s roads (an estimated 50,000 badgers are hit by vehicles every year), badgers have tunnelled under a road in Braunton, no...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Emine Saner Tags: Animal behaviour Biology Science Source Type: news

Ronald Breaker named Sterling Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Ronald R. Breaker, newly named as a Sterling Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, is one of the world ’s experts on the diversity and function of RNAs, which are crucial to carrying out a host of life processes. Breaker is best known for his discovery of riboswitches, elements of RNA that can control the expression of genes. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 27, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

The 100 best nonfiction books: No 60 – On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin (1859)
Darwin ’s revolutionary, humane and highly readable introduction to his theory of evolution is arguably the most important book of the Victorian eraWhen Charles Darwin first sawOn the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life in book form, he is said to have remarked that he found it tough going. Actually, the book, composed in a hurry to forestall his rivals, after 20 years of research, and aimed at that mythical beast “the educated general reader”, is extraordinarily accessible, sometimes even moving, in its lucid simplicity. That’s all the mor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robert McCrum Tags: Science and nature Books Culture Charles Darwin Evolution Biology Source Type: news

How do some opioids cause severe itching?
(University of North Carolina Health Care) With a more accurate understanding of the characteristics and function of the receptor MRGRPX2, University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers were also able to create chemical probe that will allow them study the receptor more precisely. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A big leap toward tinier lines
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A new interface control technique for block co-polymer self-assembly developed at MIT could provide long-sought method for making even tinier patterns on microchips with lines just 9 nanometers wide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ant-plant symbioses: Adapting to changes in partner abundance
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Many ant species live in often highly specific symbiotic relationships with plants from which both partners benefit. Researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich now reveal that such selective interactions can break down over the course of evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Farming becoming riskier under climate change
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Climate change is predicted to impact agriculture, but a new study puts these changes in terms that are directly applicable to farmers. For Illinois, the corn planting window will be split in two to avoid wet conditions in April and May. Each planting window carries increased risk -- the early planting window could be thwarted by frost or heavy precipitation, and the late window cut short by intense late-summer drought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Of Star Trek, Mark Twain and helmets: 15 new species of wasps with curious names
(Pensoft Publishers) Fifteen new species of parasitic wasps have been described from the Neotropics. Apart from being quite distinct with their large and elongated bodies, the new insects also draw attention with their curious formal names. Among them, there are species named after characters from Star Trek and Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper, and five wasps bearing names translating to 'helmet' in three different languages. The study is published in the open access journal ZooKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hydrogen production: This is how green algae assemble their enzymes
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Researchers at Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum have analyzed how green algae manufacture complex components of a hydrogen-producing enzyme. The enzyme, known as the hydrogenase, may be relevant for the biotechnological production of hydrogen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Unique wheat passes the test
(Aarhus University) A unique, patented wheat can have significant importance to agriculture, the environment and undernourished people in developing countries. Animal tests recently demonstrated that this special wheat increases P and Ca digestibility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wall lizard becomes accustomed to humans and stops hiding
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Habituating to predators or fleeing and hiding are tactics that vary between species. Scientists from two research centers in Italy and Spain have observed that adult male common wall lizards sharing their living spaces with humans become accustomed to them and hide less when humans approach them. Yellow lizards were the most 'daring.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Litter is present throughout the world's oceans: 1,220 species affected
(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) Where is marine litter concentrated, and which species and ecosystems does it affect? Researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute have for the first time compiled all scientific data published on marine litter in a single, comprehensive database, now accessible from the online portal AWI Litterbase. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Proteomics helps to understand the influence of genetic variations
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) How does type 2 diabetes develop? A team of researchers headed by the Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen and the Technical University of Munich has come closer to finding an answer to this problem. The team examined the functional effects of exemplary genetic variations relevant for type 2 diabetes. Their approach can be applied to many clinical pictures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Patent analysis highlights importance of bioactives of saffron
(Bentham Science Publishers) Increased stress levels, sleep disorders and obesity have become hallmarks of present lifestyle. These conditions are often correlated with serious health problems such as cancer, diabetes, cerebral ischemia, stroke, etc. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nitrogen foraging ability of plants relies on mobile shoot-root hormone signal
(Nagoya University) Nagoya University researchers discovered the molecular mechanisms underlying the shoot-to-root stage of nitrogen-demand signaling in plants. The team found that genes encoding CEPD polypeptides are switched on in the shoots in response to nitrogen starvation in the roots. These polypeptides then descend into the roots, and activate a nitrate transporter gene only if sufficient nitrate is available in the surrounding soil. These findings have implications for maximizing plant nutrient acquisition and improving agricultural productivity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Satellites reveal bird habitat loss in California
(Duke University) Reduced seasonal flooding of wetlands and farm fields in California's Sacramento Valley threatens a key stopover site for migratory shorebirds, a Duke-led study shows. Landsat satellite images reveal that flooded habitat is most limited during peak spring migration when the birds urgently need resting and feeding sites. Near the peak of migration, an area of seasonally flooded land twice the size of Washington, D.C. has been lost since 1983. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

For the birds: New prediction method sheds brighter light on flight
(Office of Naval Research) Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, researchers at Stanford University found a new way to precisely measure the vortices -- circular patterns of rotating air -- created by birds' wings during flight. The results shed greater light on how these creatures produce enough lift to fly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'We've left junk everywhere': why space pollution could be humanity's next big problem
With satellites under threat from collisions, a former lieutenant is now focused on technology that can remove space debrisJason Held rekindled his love for space while lying in a ditch in Bosnia in 1996, where he was one of 16,500 US troops deployed on a peacekeeping mission at the end of the Bosnian War.Then a lieutenant, he says he had “nothing to do but to watch the two armies put their guns away”. So he signed up for a class in undergraduate biology through an army education program, taking the books to the ditch and passing the hours by studying.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Space Australia news Satellites Nasa Science Source Type: news