Addiction Addiction RSS feedThis is an RSS file. You can use it to subscribe to this data in your favourite RSS reader or to display this data on your own website or blog.

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 8.

NIH MedlinePlus Feature: Alcohol-Medicines Interactions
The Summer 2016 issue of NIH MedlinePlus magazine spotlights the following:   Alcohol, Medicines, and Aging   Improper Medication Use Rising Among Older Adults   Quiz: Alcohol and Medications   (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - July 29, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: groa Source Type: news

Stress and Diabetes: Cause, Prevention, Natural Treatment
If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, mainstream medicine treats you as if you have an incurable disease. It’s like they’re saying, “Now you’re a diabetic… that’s who you are… and that’s who you’ll always be.” diabetes mellitus This approach is dead-wrong. How does diabetes develop? Adult diabetes is not something wrong with you. It’s not that you were born cursed to develop it. It develops because of lifestyle choices and environmental factors. And it CAN be reversed. And here’s something you probably don’t know: Mainstream medicine’s atti...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - July 29, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Health Source Type: news

Paternal Betel-Quid, Cigarette Use Ups Offspring ' s Metabolic Risk Paternal Betel-Quid, Cigarette Use Ups Offspring ' s Metabolic Risk
Paternal chewing of the addictive stimulant betel quid or smoking cigarettes may start children on the path to metabolic syndrome.. Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Menopause 'may mix up exercise reward pathways in the brain'
Conclusion This research uses an animal model of human menopause – surgically removing the ovaries – to see what effect this would have on rats bred to have either high or low exercise capacity.   As oestrogen has been shown to have an effect on dopamine activity in the brain's motivation centre, the researchers expected that ovary removal would have an effect on the rats' activity. However, what was unexpected was that having prior high exercise capacity seemed to give no protection – these rats seemed to decrease their activity much more than rats that had low activity to start with. These findings could be st...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Older people Neurology Source Type: news

Judge Orders Pennsylvania Drug Dealer to Pay for Narcan Kits
PITTSBURGH - Fed up with the rising number of opiate overdoses in Western Pennsylvania, an Allegheny County judge is making convicted drug dealers buy lifesaving naloxone kits for the communities where they sold drugs. Judge Anthony Mariani has added the fine to two cases in the last week, ordering Andy Buxton to pay a total of $2,650 to three agencies in the Monongahela Valley and Larry Richardson to pay $1,250 to Ross/West View Emergency Medical Squad - $50 for each brick of heroin the men were convicted of possessing with the intent to distribute. Naloxone, known by the brand name Narcan, can reverse the effects of op...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Patient Care Source Type: news

Judge Orders Pennsylvania Drug Dealer to Pay for Narcan Kits
PITTSBURGH - Fed up with the rising number of opiate overdoses in Western Pennsylvania, an Allegheny County judge is making convicted drug dealers buy lifesaving naloxone kits for the communities where they sold drugs. Judge Anthony Mariani has added the fine to two cases in the last week, ordering Andy Buxton to pay a total of $2,650 to three agencies in the Monongahela Valley and Larry Richardson to pay $1,250 to Ross/West View Emergency Medical Squad - $50 for each brick of heroin the men were convicted of possessing with the intent to distribute. Naloxone, known by the brand name Narcan, can reverse the effects ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Patient Care Source Type: news

Judge Orders Pennsylvania Drug Dealer to Pay for Narcan Kits
PITTSBURGH - Fed up with the rising number of opiate overdoses in Western Pennsylvania, an Allegheny County judge is making convicted drug dealers buy lifesaving naloxone kits for the communities where they sold drugs. Judge Anthony Mariani has added the fine to two cases in the last week, ordering Andy Buxton to pay a total of $2,650 to three agencies in the Monongahela Valley and Larry Richardson to pay $1,250 to Ross/West View Emergency Medical Squad - $50 for each brick of heroin the men were convicted of possessing with the intent to distribute. Naloxone, known by the brand name Narcan, can reverse the effects o...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Patient Care Source Type: news

New medication shows promise against liver fibrosis in animal studies
A new drug developed by scientists at the National Institutes of Health limits the progression of liver fibrosis in mice, a hopeful advance against a condition for which there is no current treatment and that often leads to serious liver disease in people with chronic alcoholism and other common diseases.   (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - July 29, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: groa Source Type: news

Alcohol Matrix Bite 5: Generating system-wide alcohol screening and brief intervention
Find out what happened when that was tried in Scotland. Develop evidence-informed understanding of three key issues: What is quality? Incentives stimulate activity, but can they backfire? Commission for alcohol, alcohol plus drugs, or lifestyle issues? (Source: Alcohol Research UK)
Source: Alcohol Research UK - July 29, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: James Nicholls Tags: Findings Source Type: news

Latest from Alcohol Policy UK – Trends in consumption and deaths: must what comes down go back up?
This guest post by John Holmes orginally appeared on his personal blog, APE: Alcohol Policy and Epidemiology and has been reproduced with his permission. (Source: Alcohol Research UK)
Source: Alcohol Research UK - July 29, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: James Nicholls Tags: News Source Type: news

Latest from Alcohol Policy UK – Concerns over evidence for Nalmefene
A recently published study published in the journal Addiction has raised questions over the validity of evidence that led to the approval of nalmefene as a drug for the treatment of alcohol dependence. (Source: Alcohol Research UK)
Source: Alcohol Research UK - July 29, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: James Nicholls Tags: News Source Type: news

Brain Geography: Map Details Newly Identified Regions of the Mind
McLean Hospital Guest Blogger Bill Carlezon, PhD The human brain is a world unto itself and still holds great potential for discovery. When we describe its structure and functionality, we often refer to the left and right hemispheres and the four lobes--frontal, temporal, occipital, and parietal. There are, however, many smaller, distinct regions within our mind, each with its own specialization. History of Brain Mapping Up to this point, mapping the brain has largely been a slow process. It started in the 1860s, when Pierre Paul Broca, MD, correlated speech control with a specific area of the cerebral cortex (the brain...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

The effect of paternal addiction on adolescent suicide attempts: a qualitative study - Rafi Bazrafshan M, Sharif F, Molazem Z, Mani A.
Background: Research shows that parents have an immense influence over their children's behavior during adolescence. Adolescents who grow up with parents who are addicted to drugs and alcohol are more likely to turn to self-destructive behaviors such as su... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The "legal highs" of novel drugs of abuse - Pompei P, Micioni Di Bonaventura MV, Cifani C.
The abuse of drugs is a widespread and growing issue, both in United States and Europe, as a number of synthetic drugs have raised popularity over the past years for recrea onal use. Moreover, the nature of addiction is often debated as either a lifestyle ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Book Review: The Big Fix: Hope After Heroin
It’s hard to watch the documentary Black Tar Heroin: The Dark End of the Street and imagine any of its five young subjects surviving past the age of thirty. Indeed, as heroin addiction has ballooned into a national epidemic, it’s hard to imagine anyone overcoming her need for this powerful substance and living a healthy life again. With her book, The Big Fix: Hope After Heroin, Tracey Helton Mitchell, one of the subjects of the film, challenges popular conceptions about recovery and advocates for more diverse and comprehensive programming to overcome this pervasive addiction.  A certified addiction specialist and sup...
Source: Psych Central - July 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Julia Patt Tags: Addictions Book Reviews General Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Policy and Advocacy Psychology Substance Abuse Treatment books about heroin books on heroin addiction Drug Addiction Drug rehabilitation emergency servic Source Type: news

Recovery of dopamine function emerges with recovery from smoking
A new study reports that smoking-related deficits in brain dopamine, a chemical implicated in reward and addiction, return to normal three months after quitting. The normalization of dopamine systems suggests smoking-related deficits are a consequence of chronic smoking, rather than a risk factor. These findings raise the possibility that treatments might be developed that normalize the dopamine system in smokers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Just 1 minute of secondhand marijuana smoke impairs blood vessel function
Researchers identified impaired blood vessel function in rats exposed to secondhand marijuana for just 1 minute, and it took 90 minutes to recover from it. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs Source Type: news

Recovery of dopamine function emerges with recovery from smoking
( Elsevier ) A new study in Biological Psychiatry reports that smoking-related deficits in brain dopamine, a chemical implicated in reward and addiction, return to normal three months after quitting. The normalization of dopamine systems suggests smoking-related deficits are a consequence of chronic smoking, rather than a risk factor. These findings raise the possibility that treatments might be developed that normalize the dopamine system in smokers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Secondhand marijuana smoke may impair cardiovascular function
In this study, rats were exposed to secondhand marijuana or tobacco smoke... (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - July 28, 2016 Category: Addiction Tags: Marijuana, Medical Consequences, Researchers, Tobacco Source Type: news

These 6 ‘Moving’ Images Remind Us Of What We Miss Out On When We’re On Our Phones
We all have a screen addict in our lives. He’s that friend who keeps his mobile phone at pinky’s reach while you’re catching up over coffee; she’s that sibling who insists on taking a picture of every single dish you order while you’re out to dinner. (Here’s hoping you’re not the screen addict in your social group). Let’s face it, we’re addicted to our phones. According to 2014 data, Americans spend an absurd 4.7 hours on their smartphones in a day. Add in the rest of our glowing devices  ― including computers, tablets and more ― and we spend 11 hours eyeballs-...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Wolverhampton girl becomes addicted to sunbeds as they help improve skin condition
Chloe Muir, 20, from Wolverhampton, had such bad psoriasis her skin would flake off and she hoovered her room daily. But going on sunbeds for up to an hour a week improved her complexion. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Expanding Access To Hepatitis C Treatment To All Who Need It
Jeffrey thought the battles in his life were over. But following his service in Iraq as a combat solider, Jeffrey fought drug addiction and was later diagnosed with HIV. The next blow came when he learned that he was infected with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a blood-borne virus that can cause chronic liver disease, serious liver damage, and liver failure. Jeffrey joined Amida Care -- New York's largest Medicaid special needs health plan for people living with chronic health conditions such as HIV/AIDS -- and was able to take control of his health through holistic care. Through Amida Care, Jeffrey was also able to access...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

The role of social novelty in risk seeking and exploratory behavior: implications for addictions - Mitchell S, Gao J, Hallett M, Voon V.
Novelty preference or sensation seeking is associated with disorders of addiction and predicts rodent compulsive drug use and adolescent binge drinking in humans. Novelty has also been shown to influence choice in the context of uncertainty and reward proc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Evaluation of CART peptide level in rat plasma and CSF: possible role as a biomarker in opioid addiction - Bakhtazad A, Vousooghi N, Garmabi B, Zarrindast MR.
It has been shown previously that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide has a modulatory role and homeostatic regulatory effect in motivation to and reward of the drugs of abuse specially psychostimulants. Recent data also showed tha... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Massachusetts woman reveals how she finally beat her food addiction and shed 168lb  
Krystle  McDonald, 28, from Winthrop, Massachusetts, sought weight loss surgery after the humiliation of being turned away from a theme park ride after ballooning to 266lb. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Treating pain without feeding addiction: Study shows promise of non-drug pain management
A new study shows the potential for patients who have both addiction issues and chronic pain to get relief from an approach that combines behavioral therapy and social support to help them manage their pain without painkillers that carry an addiction risk. The low-cost approach, grounded in psychological theories of pain, could help address the nation ' s epidemic of addictions to opioid painkillers and illicit drugs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Naloxone Saves Lives, but Is No Cure in Heroin Epidemic
Critics say the highly effective antidote provides a safety net for those who keep abusing drugs, enabling them to be revived over and over. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KATHARINE Q. SEELYE Tags: Drug Abuse and Traffic Naloxone (Drug) Medicine and Health Heroin Addiction (Psychology) Deaths (Fatalities) Food and Drug Administration LePage, Paul R Maine Source Type: news

Treating pain without feeding addiction: Study shows promise of non-drug pain management
( University of Michigan Health System ) A new study shows the potential for patients who have both addiction issues and chronic pain to get relief from an approach that combines behavioral therapy and social support to help them manage their pain without painkillers that carry an addiction risk. The low-cost approach, grounded in psychological theories of pain, could help address the nation's epidemic of addictions to opioid painkillers and illicit drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Common brain changes found in children with autism, ADHD and OCD
( Centre for Addiction and Mental Health ) A team of Toronto scientists has found similarities in brain impairments in children with autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder.The study, published this month in the American Journal of Psychiatry, involved brain imaging of white matter in 200 children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 27, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dr. Koob Receives French Legion of Honor
In recognition of his contribution to the development of scientific collaborations between France and the United States, George F. Koob, Ph.D., director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health, has received the insignia of Chevalier de la L égion d’honneur (Knight of the Legion of Honor) from the government of France. The award ceremony took place on Thursday, June 30, 2016, at the Washington, D.C., residence of French Ambassador Gerard Araud, who presented the award to Dr. (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - July 27, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: groa Source Type: news

What Happens When A Killer Is Celebrated Every Day
People need to stop telling me I should have a drink. Seriously. Not because it makes me want to drink. Because it makes them look like complete idiots. Those who know me know I don't drink. And, they know why. Those who don't know me have absolutely no business suggesting I ingest an addictive substance. How dare they? Alcohol is a drug. It kills. It doesn't matter that it's legal. No one should ever assume another person consumes alcohol. Or wants to consume alcohol. Or should consume alcohol. Or needs to consume alcohol. People who assume everyone they meet can benefit from a drink -- a beer, or a glass of wine, or ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

NHS refuses to remove excess skin of junk food addict who lost more than 13 stone
Manpreet Singh, 25, from Huddersfield, decided to transform his life in 2012 after ballooning to his heaviest of 28st 10lbs. He lost the weight naturally after adopting a healthy diet and starting exercise. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Politics of Mental Illness and Addiction: Policy Prescriptions for the Mental Health Care Revolution
A special report of the Washington Monthly magazine that provides insight on what policy makers are doing about mental health care. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - July 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

'Netflix and kill?' Binge watching box-sets linked to blood clots
Conclusion This study used data from a large Japanese cohort study to assess the link between the number of hours spent watching the television and the risk of death from pulmonary embolism. The study found that a greater number of hours watching the television increased the risk of death from pulmonary embolism. The main strength of this study is the very large sample size and long follow-up periods. However, there are a number of limitations: this study design is not able to prove cause and effect, so while there appears to be a link, we cannot be sure the cause of mortality is from television watching even thoug...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Are You a Player Or Sex Addict?
Sexual addiction can be hard to recognize, particularly in a culture where sex and sexual innuendo are used to sell everything from cheeseburgers to luxury vacations. Not to mention all the sexy selfies on social media, dating sites, and elsewhere. In some ways, a sex addict walking around in today's world is like an alcoholic wandering through a fully stocked bar where all the other patrons are sipping cocktails. It's all just very, very tempting, and everyone seems to be partaking, so what could be the harm if... Exacerbating matters is the fact that sexual compulsivity is not the sort of thing people willingly talk abou...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Book Review: Tell Me Your Story
I went to therapy twice — once after a tragic death in the family and once at the dissolution of an engagement after a five-year relationship. Walking across the threshold of the office was equally liberating and terrifying. What would the therapists say? Would they understand? Would they criticize? Despite my fear, I stepped forward. In one instance, it was the best decision I could’ve made; in the other, it was a soul-crushing exercise in honesty that left me licking my wounds. It was from this mixed-bag perspective that I picked up Dr. Tuya Pearl’s Tell Me Your Story: How Therapy Works to Awaken, Heal and Set ...
Source: Psych Central - July 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bethany Duarte Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment Anxiety books on therapy Depression Mood how to start therap Source Type: news

Ontario to stop paying for higher-strength opioid painkillers
Ontario will stop paying for higher-strength opioid medications through its Ontario Drug Benefit program next January as part of its strategy to address the growing problem of addiction to the painkillers. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won't Spur Addiction
Sports may actually provide protective effect against opioid abuse (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Painkillers for teen athletes won't spur addiction
James Bernstein, HealthDay News Teenage athletes are less likely to abuse prescription painkillers than kids who don't play sports or exercise, a new study finds. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E-cigarettes: Good news, bad news
Follow me at @JohnRossMD Americans are confused about electronic cigarettes. A recent poll showed that the public was about evenly split between those who thought that electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, were less harmful than conventional cigarettes, and those who believed that e-cigarettes were as bad as or worse than regular cigarettes. Unfortunately, there is no long-term safety data about e-cigarettes. What information we do have suggests that e-cigarettes have a complex mix of potential harms and benefits. E-cigarettes: Less deadly than regular cigarettes First, the good news: e-cigarettes are almost certainly le...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Behavioral Health Cancer Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: news

Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won ' t Spur Addiction
Sports may actually provide protective effect against opioid abuse Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Prescription Drug Abuse, Sports Injuries, Teen Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won ' t Spur Addiction: Study
MONDAY, July 25, 2016 -- Teenage athletes are less likely to abuse prescription painkillers than kids who don ' t play sports or exercise, a new study finds. The study results run counter to some research in recent years detailing concerns about... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 25, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won't Spur Addiction: Study
Title: Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won't Spur Addiction: Study Category: Health News Created: 7/25/2016 12:00:00 AM Last Editorial Review: 7/25/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - July 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Athletic teens less likely to transition from prescription pain relievers to heroin
  Teens who participate in daily sports and exercise activities are less likely to transition from opioid pain reliever use to heroin, according to research funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and published today in Pediatrics.   There have been anecdotal reports of teen... (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - July 25, 2016 Category: Addiction Tags: Heroin, Opioids, Pain, Prescription Drugs, Prevention Research, Researchers, Teens Source Type: news

Study Finds Drop In Prescription Drugs In Medical Marijuana States
States looking for a way to reduce Medicare spending and prescription drug use may want to turn to legalizing medical marijuana, a new study suggests. The District of Columbia and the 17 states that had medical marijuana as an alternative to prescription drugs in 2013 saved an estimated total of $165.2 million in Medicare program and enrollee spending that year, researchers at the University of Georgia reported in the journal Health Affairs this month. “The results suggest that if all states had implemented medical marijuana the overall savings to Medicare would have been around $468 million,” a press release o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study Finds Drop In Prescription Drugs In Medical Marijuana States
States looking for a way to reduce Medicare spending and prescription drug use may want to turn to legalizing medical marijuana, a new study suggests. The District of Columbia and the 17 states that had medical marijuana as an alternative to prescription drugs in 2013 saved an estimated total of $165.2 million in Medicare program and enrollee spending that year, researchers at the University of Georgia reported in the journal Health Affairs this month. “The results suggest that if all states had implemented medical marijuana the overall savings to Medicare would have been around $468 million,” a press release o...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Pills laced with deadly opioid infiltrating drug market, DEA says
The illegal drugs look like known prescription painkillers and contain high amounts of fentanyl as law enforcement says problem is expected to escalate Hundreds of thousands of counterfeit prescription pills laced with a deadly synthetic opioid have infiltrated the US drug market, according to the US Drug Enforcement Administration, with the problem expected to escalate. The pills are pressed using pharmacy-grade machines to look like known prescription painkillers that an increasing number of Americans addicted to opioids seek to buy illegally. They contain various amounts of fentanyl – a synthetic drug between 50 an...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 24, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Susan Zalkind in Boston Tags: US news Drugs Science Society Source Type: news

Is addiction really a disease?
Treating addiction as if it is a learned pattern of thinking gives addicts the chance to stay clean What is addiction? For the majority who have strong opinions on the matter, addiction is a disease. In fact it ’s “a chronic relapsing brain disease” according to the American National Institute on Drug Abuse . This definition, born of the marriage between medicine and neuroscience, is based on the finding that the brain changes with addiction. It ’s a definition that’s been absorbed and disseminated by rehab facilities, 12-step programmes, policy makers and politicians. It’s the defining credo of the addiction-...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 24, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Marc Lewis Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Even Deadlier Than You Think, Study Suggests
A new study suggests that alcohol is a direct cause of cancer in several areas of the body. The study, published Thursday in the scientific journal Addiction, consists of a major review of 10 years’ worth of studies from several organizations, including the World Cancer Research Fund, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. And its conclusions are dire.  Nearly 6 percent of cancer deaths worldwide can be linked to alcohol, including in people who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, the study concludes. “From a public health perspective, a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Even Deadlier Than You Think, Study Suggests
A new study suggests that alcohol is a direct cause of cancer in several areas of the body. The study, published Thursday in the scientific journal Addiction, consists of a major review of 10 years’ worth of studies from several organizations, including the World Cancer Research Fund, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. And its conclusions are dire.  Nearly 6 percent of cancer deaths worldwide can be linked to alcohol, including in people who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, the study concludes. “From a public health perspective, a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news