Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

Addiction Addiction RSS feedThis is an RSS file. You can use it to subscribe to this data in your favourite RSS reader or to display this data on your own website or blog.

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 5.

Proposed Seattle Homeless Shelter May Allow Residents To Use Heroin
As Seattle continues to battle its heroin crisis, a group tasked with addressing the issue is pushing an unconventional tactic for helping homeless addicts.  The Task Force on Heroin and Prescription Opiate Addiction, formed by the city in March, has put its support behind building a shelter where homeless addicts could use heroin under supervision, according to The Seattle Times.  Those who support such a facility say it could help prevent overdose deaths, HIV and hepatitis C transmissions and keep used needles off the streets. Taxpayers might benefit too, since the facility could potentially reduce pu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Duke Health Receives Support from IBM to Advance Community Wellness Program
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-13064 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016Duke Health Receives Support from IBM to Advance Community Wellness ProgramDURHAM, N.C. --Duke Health was named among the first recipients of the IBM Health Corps award, and will be receiving expertise from some of IBM ’s top employees to build a communications infrastructure that will help connect members of Durham community health partnerships.Duke was one of five institutions worldwide selected as part of IBM ’s new Health Corps program, which aims to address disparities in he...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Seattle ’ s Potential Solution for Heroin Epidemic: Places for Legal Drug Use
A city task force endorsed the idea of safe consumption facilities, which would allow addicts to take drugs without fear of being arrested. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JONAH ENGEL BROMWICH Tags: Drug Abuse and Traffic Hypodermic Needles and Syringes Heroin Seattle Times Seattle (Wash) Vancouver (British Columbia) Source Type: news

Q & A: What Has Health Reform Meant for Rural America?
University of Washington professors Eric Larson and Davis Patterson, the director and deputy director of the WWAMI Rural Health Research Center, answer questions on recent rural health issues. Topics discussed include hospital finance and closures, workforce shortages, opioid addiction, the practical concerns related to the Affordable Care Act, community paramedicine, telemedicine, and dental health. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - August 25, 2016 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

United States Surgeon General Appeals to America ’s Clinicians to “Turn the Tide” on the Prescription Drug Epidemic
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek H Murthy is making efforts to reverse the trends of the nation's prescription opioid epidemic. In a letter to 2.3 million American health professionals, Murthy expressed understanding that the problem of balancing reducing patient pain with the increasing risk of addiction was a difficult one but explained that health professionals were uniquely positioned to have a positive impact. He urged them to visit his website and included in the letter apocket guidedetailing the CDC's guidelines for opioid prescriptions. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - August 25, 2016 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Salk scientists map brain's action center
(Salk Institute) New work dispels long-held notions about area involved in Parkinson's and addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Surgeon General mails letters to America ’s physicians
Check your mailbox over the next two weeks —there should be a letter from U.S. Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy, MD, calling on all physicians throughout the nation to raise awareness and further efforts to end the opioid overdose epidemic. Physicians are in a unique position of leadership when it comes to this epidemic —they are on the front lines witnessing the impact every day from emergency department overdoses to substance use disorder treatment. The letter asks directly for physicians’ help to solve and bring an end to the opioid overdose epidemic.“We will educate ourselves to treat pain safely and effectivel...
Source: AMA Wire - August 25, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

National Drug & amp; Alcohol Facts Week begins January 23
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) announced today that the next National Drug& Alcohol Facts WeekSM (NDAFW) will be held Jan. 23-29, 2017, with event registration beginning immediately. NDAFW is an annual, week-long... (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - August 25, 2016 Category: Addiction Tags: Parents, Students, Teachers Source Type: news

We are all ' wired ' for addiction, says researcher
Drug addicts and non-addicts may have more in common than ever thought, according to a researcher who found that to some degree, everyone ’s brain is “wired” to become addicted. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Help! I Am Gaining Weight Watching The Food Network?
I just have to stop channel surfing while working out in the gym! If I'm stuck with the news channels, I might actually pay attention to my exercise. But when I click on the cooking show button, I become mesmerized watching overweight chefs prepare dishes that, if consumed in typical amounts, will certainly add to the growing rate of obesity in the country. To be sure, some of the skinny chefs cook, most of the time, with skinny ingredients. But there are a few whose girth is testimony to the copious quantities of extremely high-fat ingredients comprising their dishes. One recently caught my attention. A charming, articu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Could A New Drug Target Prevent Tolerance And Addiction To Opioids?
Preventing addiction is a topic of discussion in many communities where opioid-related overdoses are overwhelmingly prevalent. There are currently a few drugs in the market designed to assist painkiller abusers with addiction. Efforts to identify brain mechanisms involved in this chronic disease are ongoing among researchers. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 24, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: CJ Arlotta Source Type: news

DSM-5 Made A Mistake Eliminating Substance Abuse
This article was originally published on Recovery Brands' Pro Talk/Pro Corner Allen Frances is a professor emeritus at Duke University and was the chairman of the DSM-IV task force. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pioneering methadone programme in Dar es Salaam gives hope to thousands
Mwananyamala is one of two hospitals in Dar es Salaam that now make methadone available as treatment for addiction. Methadone maintenance treatment is regarded by WHO as the most effective therapy for heroin users, and methadone was added to WHO ’s model essential medicines list in 2005. In combination with psychosocial support, it can help to reduce addiction to opioids such as heroin, prevent infection with HIV and other diseases transmitted by sharing needles, and reduce the criminal behaviour that often accompanies illicit drug use. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - August 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: substance abuse [subject], drug addiction, drug dependence, drug abuse, drug use, substance abuse [subject], drug addiction, drug dependence, drug abuse, drug use, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], United Republic of Tanzania [country] Source Type: news

How Staten Island ’ s Drug Problem Made It a Target for Poaching Patients
Addiction treatment centers in the borough, which has been hit hard by the opioid epidemic, say they are being offered kickbacks for patient referrals. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MEGAN JULA Tags: Drug Abuse and Traffic Therapy and Rehabilitation Staten Island (NYC) Heroin Pain-Relieving Drugs Source Type: news

PAINWeek 2016: The National Association of Drug Diversion...
NADDI will present a full-day track on addiction and abuse at the PAINWeek National Conference, on Thursday, September 8(PRWeb August 23, 2016)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/08/prweb13608686.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - August 24, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Using neurosurgical solutions to manage chronic pain
Back pain is one of the most common ailments chronic pain patients face. For some, a neurosurgical approach can offer much relief and may be an alternative to long-term opioid therapy. Here ’s what one neurosurgeon and member of the AMA Task Force to Reduce Prescription Opioid Abuse had to say about treating patients with chronic pain and the Task Force’s efforts to end the opioid overdose epidemic.Treating chronic back pain in neurosurgery Jennifer Sweet, MD, is a neurosurgeon at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland and the physician representative for the American Association of Neurological Surgeon...
Source: AMA Wire - August 23, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

Ethanol-induced motor impairment mediated by inhibition of α7 nicotinic receptors - McDaid J, Abburi C, Wolfman SL, Gallagher K, McGehee DS.
UNLABELLED: Nicotine and ethanol (EtOH) are among the most widely co-abused substances, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) contribute to the behavioral effects of both drugs. Along with their role in addiction, nAChRs also contribute to motor c... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Healing in Hawaii – The Role of Culture in Addiction Recovery
Details the Ho'omau Ke Ola Native Hawaiian substance abuse treatment program, funded in part by SAMHSA's Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment block grant, which merges western treatment practices with a cultural curriculum that emphasizes community and support systems. Native Hawaiians experience higher rates of substance use and mental health disorders, among other ailments, than any other ethnic group on the islands. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - August 23, 2016 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

New NIH-funded study to identify risks for vulnerability to drug addiction
(Binghamton University) A new study aims to better understand what makes some individuals particularly vulnerable to developing drug addiction. A team of researchers from across the country will look at how genes that influence brain function cause risk for addictions. J. David Jentsch, Empire Innovation Professor of psychology at Binghamton University, is part of the team of investigators awarded a new grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health to conduct the research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Let Go of Pain In 5 Healthy Steps
Do you ever feel like you just can't let go? Can't let go of that feeling of betrayal, that dream that has eluded you, the job you didn't get, the friend who turned out to be less than (the list goes on). We don't often think about the word "rumination" or its difference from "reflection," but there IS a big difference! And how we choose to view, process, and move beyond emotional challenges (or not) that cross our path sets the tone for how we handle future challenges and decision making. At its best, rumination is a compulsion, and at its worse an addiction. When we repetitively think about the causes, decisions and p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

AAP: Offer Teens Medication-Assisted Tx for Opioid Addiction
(MedPage Today) -- Treatment underused, severely restricted for young patients (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - August 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Fact Sheet: Fall Semester - A Time for Parents to Discuss the Risks of College Drinking
As college students arrive on campus this fall, it ’s a time of new experiences, new friendships, and making memories that will last a lifetime.  (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - August 22, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: groa Source Type: news

Watching thoughts -- and addiction -- form in the brain
In a classic experiment, Ivan Pavlov conditioned dogs to salivate at the ringing of a bell. Now, scientists can see what happens in the brains of live animals during this experiment with a new technique. The approach could lead to a greater understanding of how we learn and develop addictions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gloucester Needle Exchange Program Approved
GLOUCESTER (AP) — Massachusetts public health officials have approved the North Shore’s first needle exchange program. The Department of Public Health has given the Gloucester-based service agency North Shore Health Project the go-ahead. Director Susan Coviello tells The Gloucester Daily Times she hopes to have the program in place by October. The program will include counseling, disease screening, Narcan distribution and education in addition to the needle exchange. Under such programs, drug abusers and others can get clean, new needles, reducing the risk of disease and infection that comes with re-using needles. ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Gloucester needle exchange opiate crisis Source Type: news

Uruguay ’s Victory over Philip Morris: a Win for Tobacco Control and Public Health
Credit: BigstockBy Germán VelásquezGENEVA, Aug 22 2016 (IPS)In a landmark decision that has been hailed as a victory of public health measures against narrow commercial interests, an international tribunal has dismissed a claim by tobacco giant company Philip Morris that the Uruguay government violated its rights by instituting tobacco control measures.The ruling had been much anticipated as it was the first international case brought against a government for taking measures to curb the marketing of tobacco products.Philip Morris had started proceedings in February 2010 against Uruguay at the International Centre for Set...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: German Velasquez Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Trade & Investment Philip Morris Tobacco Uruguay Source Type: news

More psychiatrists will not improve access to mental health care, Canadian study suggests
(Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) Increasing the supply of psychiatrists in Ontario, Canada has not significantly improved access to psychiatric care, according to a new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New drug target could prevent tolerance and addiction to opioids, study finds
(Georgia State University) Researchers have identified a brain mechanism that could be a drug target to help prevent tolerance and addiction to opioid pain medication, such as morphine, according to a study by Georgia State University and Emory University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Cocaine addiction reversed in rats with novel compound
Treating rats with a compound that blocks TrkB receptors in the brain's reward system was found to reverse signs of cocaine dependency, researchers report. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs Source Type: news

Dr. Drew turns whistleblower on Hillary Clinton's failing health
(NaturalNews) Board-certified internist, addiction medicine specialist and TV personality, Dr. Drew Pinsky, recently made headlines after commenting on the declining health of Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton, and the inadequate medical care she appears to be receiving... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Are You an Almost-Alcoholic?
If you occasionally have too much to drink, you’re probably not at great risk for becoming an alcoholic. But you might wonder if you’re at risk of becoming an “almost-alcoholic” — if you even know what that means. Perhaps you’re secretly worried that your social drinking behavior might be veering into dangerous territory. Here’s how to identify if you’re an almost-alcoholic. The term comes from a book by the same name written by Dr. Robert L. Doyle, a professor of behavioral health at Harvard University, and Dr. Joseph Nowinski, a psychologist. Their work pinpointed the fine line where casual drinking c...
Source: Psych Central - August 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Disorders General Substance Abuse Alcohol Abuse Alcohol law Alcoholic beverage Beer Binge Drinking Dr. Joseph Nowinski Dr. Robert L. Doyle Drinking culture Source Type: news

Marijuana: Health effects of recreational and medical use
Marijuana is widely used, especially in adolescents and young adults. In the US, there are about 20 million users (about 7.5% of people aged 12 or older). Marijuana is a mind-altering (psychoactive) drug. Similar to hemp, it comes from the cannabis plant. The plant’s primary drug effects come from the chemical delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or “THC.” Marijuana is smoked, “vaped” (inhaling the vapor), or ingested in foods or teas. Over the last few decades, the concentration of THC in the cannabis plant has been increasing. In addition, the plant extracts are more potent. Short-term effects of marijuana Marijuana i...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - August 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Authors: Wynne Armand, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Drugs and Supplements Pain Management Source Type: news

Perfect painkiller? Safe alternative to opiates may have been found
Conclusion This experimental study identified a new compound, PZM21, and investigated its effectiveness and safety in mice compared to morphine and TRV130. This research hopes to aid the development of an effective alternative to morphine that has none of the drawbacks, such as respiratory depression, constipation and addiction. The researchers' experiments in mice found that PZM21 was more effective as a longer-lasting painkiller than morphine and that, at equal painkilling doses, had hardly any effect on respiratory depression, unlike morphine. They also found that compared to morphine, the constipating effect was reduce...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Neurology Source Type: news

Violence, addiction, recovery: an anthropological study of Mexico's anexos - Garcia A, Anderson B.
Informal, coercive residential centers for the treatment of addiction are widespread and growing throughout Latin America. In Mexico these centers are called "anexos" and they are run and utilized by low-income individuals and families with problems relate... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Substance related and addictive disorders connect ADHD with catastrophic life events: a mini review - Yoshimasu K.
OBJECTIVE: To discuss the role of substance-related and addictive disorders (SRAD) that lead patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to suicide and homicide (catastrophic events). METHOD: Relevant articles were searched via Pu... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

The Sobriety Collective, For Creatives Battling Substance Use Disorder
Laura Silverman (pictured above) woke up in New York City, still tired and groggy from the night before. It was the first time she, a resident of Washington D.C., ever visited the City. She wasn't in a comfy hotel bed though; she was in the hospital. For alcohol poisoning. And it wasn't the first time. "I drank for six years," said Silverman. "At first it was fun, then fun with problems, then just problems. When I was hospitalized that second time and woke up relatively unscathed, it felt like divine intervention or something a little bigger than just me." After being reunited with her cousin and her belongings, Silverma...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Are painkillers driving high school footballers into heroin addiction?
Young athletes who play one sport are at greater risk for injuries that may require some form of opioid pain management. That carries risks, warns University of Michigan sociology expert Phil Veliz. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Opioid May Kill Pain Without The Side Effects
BOSTON (CBS) – Scientists are studying a new opioid that has the pain killing effects of morphine without the side effects. Researchers in California tested the new drug on mice and found that it could reduce pain signals in the brain similar to morphine without causing constipation or breathing problems, which can result in death. The drug may also pose less risk for addiction. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Are You Happy?
Are you happy? You know the "Zip-a-dee-doo-dah" kind of happy. Happy thoughts. Happy life. Happy you. That may seem like a tall order, right? Why is it that happiness seems to come and go, is saved for special occasions -- and often alludes us all together? Maybe it's because we are looking for love in all the wrong places -- and I'm talking self-love to start. If only we could add it to our Amazon shopping carts and with one click, done, a box of happy would arrive at our doorstep. Guess what? I know I'm being a little silly here, but it kind of is that simple. Even when I first typed the words, Are you happy, I had to...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Study supports new strategy to fight cocaine addiction
Strong evidence supporting a new strategy against drug addiction has been revealed by research. The researchers showed that a compound that inhibits the activity of certain brain-cell receptors can reverse signs of cocaine dependency in rodents. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

UNC-supported research claims breakthrough in pain medication
An international team that includes researchers from UNC-Chapel Hill says they have developed a new pain killing drug candidate that doesn ’t trigger side effects prevalent with current opioids. The work is still in its early stages, but the researchers say they potentially found a drug that patients won’t become addicted to and blocks pain. If true, the findings would be a major breakthrough, especially as opioid dependence and o verdoses on painkilling drugs, including morphine and oxycodone,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 18, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jason deBruyn Source Type: news

Compound may kill pain like opioids, without addiction risk
Stephen FellerWASHINGTON, Aug. 18 (UPI) -- Researchers at four universities discovered a compound that may kill pain as well as opioid drugs, without the side effects or potential for addiction. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

TSRI study supports new strategy to fight cocaine addiction
(Scripps Research Institute) An international team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has found strong evidence supporting a new strategy against drug addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 18, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nearly One in Three Dentists Say They Know of an Opioid-Addicted...
Leading dental magazine shines a light on the U.S. opioid addiction epidemic.(PRWeb August 17, 2016)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/DMD/OpioidAddiction/prweb13621393.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - August 18, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The women ADDICTED to exercise because they're hooked on the natural high
Growing numbers of women are becoming hooked on the powerful feelings and endorphins which flood their bodies after a gym session, which can kick in after just half an hour. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shoichet co-led research develops safer, potentially less addictive painkiller
Research co-led by USCF School of Pharmacy faculty memberBrian Shoichet, PhD, has developed a new opioid drug candidate that blocks pain as effectively as morphine in mice, without triggering dangerous side effects, and also apparently without the addictive properties of current prescription painkillers. (Source: UCSF School of Pharmacy News)
Source: UCSF School of Pharmacy News - August 18, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Paula Joyce Source Type: news

Scientists Engineer An Opioid That May Reduce Pain With Less Risk
Opioids lock to a receptor in the brain that controls pain relief, pleasure and need. A new compound may offer relief without as much risk of addiction or overdose. But it's only been tested in mice. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angus Chen Source Type: news

Scientists design a drug that relieves pain like an opioid without some dangerous side effects
What if you could design a drug that has all the pain-relieving power of morphine but none of its dangerous or addictive side  effects?Scientists have spent years trying to do just that, and on Wednesday, they unveiled one of their most promising compounds yet — a chemical concoction they dubbed... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - August 17, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

More formal addictions training 'urgently' needed for doctors, says new study
Study by B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS reveals only 25 addiction care doctors in B.C. are certified by the most recognized standards board in North America. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/British Columbia Source Type: news

Comment: Research suggests most white cider is consumed by people with severe alcohol dependency
Alcohol dependency is a complex problem to which there are no simple solutions.  There are many routes into dependency, many ways in which it manifests itself and many approaches to treatment.  However, dependent drinkers also require access to large, affordable volumes of alcohol.  Recent research by Professor Jonathan Chick and colleagues shows that, in Scotland at least, one of the primary sources of cheap, high strength alcohol is white cider. In a letter published in Clinical Medicine, based on research funded by Alcohol Research UK and the Chief Scientist Office, Chick and colleagues estimate the proportion of all...
Source: Alcohol Research UK - August 17, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: Julie Symes Tags: News minimum unit pricing Scotland Source Type: news

Drastic 300% rise in babies born already addicted to heroin, opioids, painkillers
(NaturalNews) The number of babies who are born addicted to opioids has tripled in just 15 years in our country. It's a shocking statistic that underscores just how far opioid addiction reaches. In 1999, 1.5 babies in every 1,000 births were born addicted to opioids and placed into... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news