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The Humble Honeybee
Honeybees are incomparable little creatures. Allow me to tell you why: Honeybees and humans share many things in common: we socialize, dance, eat honey, touch, feel, mimic one another, sleep, enjoy nicotine, caffeine, vote and we both get sick. After a queen honeybee lays a couple million eggs, she begins to produce fewer pheromones (or chemical scents), which cause the worker bees to feed half a dozen larvae royal jelly or pure protein as they begin rearing a new queen. It’s up to the scout bees to locate a new site to move the existing queen and thousands of workers to create with their beeswax a new hive. The bee...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Neonicotinoid pesticides cause harm to honeybees
One possible cause of the alarming bee mortality we are witnessing is the use of the very active systemic insecticides called neonicotinoids. A previously unknown and harmful effect of neonicotinoids has been identified by researchers. They discovered that neonicotinoids in low and field-relevant concentrations reduce the concentration of acetylcholine in the royal jelly/larval food secreted by nurse bees. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Neonicotinoid pesticides cause harm to honeybees
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) One possible cause of the alarming bee mortality we are witnessing is the use of the very active systemic insecticides called neonicotinoids. A previously unknown and harmful effect of neonicotinoids has been identified by researchers at the Mainz University Medical Center and Goethe University Frankfurt. They discovered that neonicotinoids in low and field-relevant concentrations reduce the concentration of acetylcholine in the royal jelly/larval food secreted by nurse bees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Beyond royal jelly: Study identifies plant chemical that determines a honey bee's caste
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A closer look at how honey bee colonies determine which larvae will serve as workers and which will become queens reveals that a plant chemical, p-coumaric acid, plays a key role in the bees' developmental fate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 28, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nutrigenomics: The Diet That Can Change Your DNA
Diet and exercise. The importance of both was known to the earliest humans, but today we know much more about how food and exercise affects our minds and bodies through scientific evidence. In this two-part series, I delve into the latest science behind diet and exercise and how they are ultimately the foundation of optimal health. My last post was on the effects of exercise on the brain; here I explore nutrition: During the winter of 1944-1945, a terrible famine swept through the Netherlands and carried on until liberation in May 1945. During this time, dubbed the "Hongerwinter," the Dutch population's nutritio...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Discover the wondrous health benefits of royal jelly
(NaturalNews) Royal jelly is a thick and milky substance made by worker bees as food for the queen bee. They do this by mixing honey, bee pollen and enzymes from their throat glands. Because the queen bee is larger, stronger, has more stamina and lives longer than the other bees,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news