Experiments with roundworms suggest alternatives for the treatment of schizophrenia
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Researchers used C. elegans as an animal model to investigate the importance of certain human genes for the treatment of schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rice U. study highlights danger of vitamin B12 deficiency
(Rice University) Using roundworms, one of Earth's simplest animals, Rice University bioscientists have found the first direct link between a diet containing too little vitamin B12 and an increased risk of infection by two potentially deadly pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Long-lived parents produce better quality offspring
(University of East Anglia) New research shows that long-lived parents produce better quality offspring.Researchers studied a gene associated with ageing in roundworms. They found that by reducing this gene's expression, they could not only more than double the worm's lifespan - but also improve the fitness of its offspring.The findings support an emerging new theory that we have genes that age us, and that shutting down these genes in later life could one day help us stay younger and healthier for longer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inside the brains of hungry worms, researchers find clues about how they hunt
(Rockefeller University) When looking for food, the roundworm C. elegans searches the same area for up to 20 minutes before trying its luck at more distant locales. New research on the worm's brain explains how this behavior arises at the level of molecules and cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The smell of food controls cellular recycling and affects life expectancy
(University of Cologne) The smell of food affects physiology and aging. That is the result of research conducted on the model organism of the roundworm by a research team led by Professor Thorsten Hoppe at the Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research (CECAD). Surprisingly, this relationship is due to a single pair of olfactory neurons. The results have now been published in Nature Metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Konstanz develops first genetic switch for C. elegans
(University of Konstanz) With their first ever RNA-based inducible system for switching on genes in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, two researchers from the University of Konstanz have closed a significant gap in the research on and usage of genetic switches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New findings on genes that drive male-female brain differences, timing of puberty
(Columbia University) Columbia University researchers have discovered a group of genes in roundworms that control the onset of puberty and induce sex differences in neural structures that raise new questions of whether differences in male and female behavior are hardwired in our brains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotic could protect against neurodegenerative diseases during aging
(eLife) An antibiotic, minocycline, can increase the lifespan of roundworms by preventing the build-up of proteins during aging, a study in the open-access journal eLife reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study documents paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants. How these effects are transmitted across generations, however, remains mysterious. A new study in the roundworm C. elegans documents the transmission via sperm of epigenetic marks that are both necessary and sufficient to guide proper development of germ cells in the offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Teen Youngest Person in History of IDWeek to Present Teen Youngest Person in History of IDWeek to Present
The 13-year-old scientist turned heads at the conference with a newsworthy abstract that examines levels of roundworm contamination in public parks.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

In a tiny worm, a close-up view of where genes are working
(Princeton University, Engineering School) A team at Princeton's Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics has produced new resources for research involving the roundworm C. elegans: a comprehensive view of which genes are active in each of the four major tissues of adult worms, as well as a tool for predicting gene activity across 76 more specific cell types. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Man almost goes blind after he was infected with roundworm parasite from eating raw chicken sushi
A Japanese man who ate uncooked chicken sashimi went to hospital with chest pain, where doctors diagnosed him with a parasitic illness which had caused growths to appear in his lungs and liver. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Signaling cascade that repairs damaged nerve cells characterized
(Nagoya University) Through a study of roundworm nerve cells with severed axons, researchers at Nagoya University showed that a signaling cascade that normally functions in promoting the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells also acts in inducing axon regeneration. The findings shed light on a fundamental feature of nerve repair, which is limited in the central nervous system in humans, and thus could pave the way towards treatments for brain and spinal cord injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers look to worms for a new model of a peripheral nervous system disease
(Scripps Research Institute) Scientists have discovered that a microscopic roundworm develops similar nerve damage to human patients when their muscle cells are genetically engineered to produce TTR proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mosquito screening useful in monitoring lymphatic filariasis re-emergence
(PLOS) To ensure elimination of the Wuchereria bancrofti, a parasitic roundworm that causes lymphatic filariasis, public health workers must follow up mass drug administration with careful monitoring for recurrence. To that end, a study published this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases analyzes the effectiveness of mosquito screening as a tool to gauge parasite presence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nitric oxide tells roundworms to avoid bad bacteria
(eLife) Nitric oxide gas produced by a type of harmful bacteria lets roundworms know to stay away from it, says a new study published in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Everything you need to know about ascariasis
Ascariasis occurs when a parasitic roundworm infects a person's small intestine. It may not cause symptoms initially, but an extensive infection can lead to dangerous gastrointestinal blockages. Learn more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of ascariasis here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can you treat elephantiasis?
Elephantiasis is a debilitating tropical disease that is spread by mosquito bites. There are many causes, including specific types of parasitic roundworms. It is treated with drugs, and prevention involves avoiding mosquitoes by using nets and insect repellent. Learn more about elephantiasis here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

The new tech revolutionizing the global fight against ancient diseases
On the second floor of an infectious-disease research facility in this African capital, Dr. Joseph Kamgno, the country's leading expert on parasitic roundworms, stood at his desk staring down at the black hard-shelled case that had just arrived from a bioengineering lab at the University of California-Berkeley. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sir John Sulston obituary
Pioneering biologist best known for his work on the human genome who was a fierce advocate of free access to scientific dataIn 2002 the biologist John Sulston, who has died of stomach cancer aged 75,shared a Nobel prize for physiology. He won it for elucidating the entire sequence in which the daughters of a single cell divide and sometimes disappear as an embryo grows into an adult in the tiny roundwormCaenorhabditis elegans. However, he is much better known for leading the British team that sequenced a third of the human genome, and for the fierce integrity with which he successfully argued that all genomic data should b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Georgina Ferry Tags: Genetics Human Genome Project Biology Science Nobel prizes Science prizes People in science Cancer Cambridge University of Cambridge US news California Source Type: news

Forecast launched to help sheep farmers respond to annual spring threat to young lambs
It may not feel like it in parts of the UK hit by 'The Beast from the East' and Storm Emma, but spring is just around the corner – and with it the annual deadly threat from the roundworm Nematodirus in lambs. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 7, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School; Press Release Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Baylisascaris procyonis Encephalomyelitis in a Toddler — King County, Washington, 2017
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - January 18, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

The Parasite on the Playground
Roundworm eggs, shed by stray dogs, can be ingested by children playing outside. The worm ’ s larvae have been found in the brain, experts say, perhaps impairing development. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LAURA BEIL Tags: Parasites Dogs Brain Worms Playgrounds Mental Health and Disorders Clinical Infectious Diseases (Journal) SUNY Downstate Medical Center Source Type: news

FDA-approved high blood pressure drug extends life span in roundworms
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) An FDA-approved drug to treat high blood pressure seems to extend life span in worms via a cell signaling pathway that may mimic caloric restriction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSW researchers identify possible new way to treat parasitic infections
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a chemical that suppresses the lethal form of a parasitic infection caused by roundworms that affects up to 100 million people and usually causes only mild symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists sniff out new treatment for Alzheimer's; new research suggests brain cells can be protected by stimulating the sense of smell
(Natural News) A study published in the journal Science Signaling has revealed that teaching roundworms to sniff out a certain type of bacterium has lead them to develop a defense mechanism to preserve their brain cells. The findings show potential as a drug-free intervention against neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia and Huntington’s disease, the researchers have stated.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The humble roundworm offers hope for dementia sufferers
A study from the University of Iowa found that when worms were taught to sniff danger it protected neurons. This could lead to non-pharmaceutical treatment for dementia and  Huntington's disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Worms learn to smell danger
(University of Iowa) University of Iowa researchers report that a roundworm can learn to put on alert a defense system important for protecting cells from damage. The finding could lead to a new approach for treating neurodegenerative diseases in humans caused by damaged cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate change could wipe out a third of parasite species, study finds
Parasites such as lice and fleas are crucial to ecosystems, scientists say, and extinctions could lead to unpredictable invasionsClimate change could wipe out a third of all parasite species on Earth, according to the most comprehensive analysis to date.Tapeworms, roundworms, ticks, lice and fleas are feared for the diseases they cause or carry, but scientists warn that they also play a vital role in ecosystems. Major extinctions among parasites could lead to unpredictable invasions of surviving parasites into new areas, affecting wildlife and humans and making a “significant contribution” to the sixth mass ext...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Climate change Insects Wildlife Conservation Science Environment Animals World news US news Source Type: news

Undetected infection
(University of California - Santa Barbara) The raccoon that topples your trashcan and pillages your garden may leave more than just a mess. More likely than not, it also contaminates your yard with parasites -- most notably, raccoon roundworms (Baylisascaris procyonis). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How Roundworms Sleep
When Caenorhabditis elegans surrenders to slumber, the majority of its neurons fall silent. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 22, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Worm studies investigate how grandparents' experiences can affect our genes
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Studies of human populations suggest that our health and longevity could be affected by the diets and experiences of our grandparents. But the exact nature of these effects and how they are transmitted across generations remain unclear. In Susan Strome's lab at UC Santa Cruz, research on a tiny roundworm called C. elegans is helping to solve this puzzle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Living long and living well: Is it possible to do both?
(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, are developing metrics to identify the health markers for old age in the roundworm, C. elegans, a popular model in aging research. Their research, which provides insight into the tradeoffs between lifespan and health span, is the subject of a recent paper in Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences, a publication of the Gerontological Society of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study sheds light on link between diseases like Alzheimer's and normal aging in the brain
Neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with protein aggregates, highly intractable clumps of protein. Experiments on roundworms and mouse brain extracts yielded evidence that these disease-associated aggregates can be directly induced by proteins that aggregate together during normal aging. The present study therefore opens up a new area of preventative research targeting these age-dependent protein aggregates as possible therapeutic targets. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study sheds light on link between diseases like Alzheimer's and normal aging in the brain
(Frontiers) Neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with protein aggregates, highly intractable clumps of protein. Experiments on roundworms and mouse brain extracts yielded evidence that these disease-associated aggregates can be directly induced by proteins that aggregate together during normal aging. The present study therefore opens up a new area of preventative research targeting these age-dependent protein aggregates as possible therapeutic targets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study of worms reveals ‘selfish genes’ that encode a toxin – and its antidote
FINDINGSA UCLA study has found that a common strain of  Caenorhabditis elegans — a type of roundworm frequently used in laboratory research on neural development — has a pair of genes that encode both a poison and its antidote. The new research also revealed that if worms with the two genes mate with wild strains of C. elegans that don’t have b oth genes, their offspring who don’t inherit the antidote can’t protect themselves from the toxin — which is produced by mother worms — and die while they are still embryos.The pair of genes represents one of the clearest exam...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What roundworms can teach us about human growth
Human beings and the roundworm C. elegans have more in common than you'd expect. Thanks to a common ancestor more than 700 million years ago humans and roundworms have a similar hormone to drive and regulate growth. By activating or deactivating this hormone scientists can stimulate or stunt the growth of the worms. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In roundworms, fats tip the scales of fertility
Two scientists have discovered how fat levels in a tiny soil-dwelling roundworm (C. elegans) can tip the balance between whether the worm makes eggs or sperm. Although the researchers discovered this phenomenon in worms, the research could have implications for future studies into human fertility and reproductive development. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In roundworms, fats tip the scales of fertility
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Two University of Colorado Boulder scientists have discovered how fat levels in a tiny soil-dwelling roundworm (C. elegans) can tip the balance between whether the worm makes eggs or sperm. Although the researchers discovered this phenomenon in worms, the research could have implications for future studies into human fertility and reproductive development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Olive oil, nuts and avocado can help you live forever
Roundworms were found to become obese and live for two days longer than their svelte counterparts after consuming mono-unsaturated fats, researchers from Stanford University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Monounsaturated fats help roundworms live longer, researchers say
Pudgy roundworms storing a particular type of fat live longer than their more svelte counterparts, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Raccoon Parasite Not as Deadly to Humans as Thought
Researchers find confirmed cases of raccoon roundworm where patients had no symptomsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Animal Diseases and Your Health, Parasitic Diseases (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Raccoon Parasite Not as Deadly to Humans as Thought
FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 -- A raccoon parasite that can be deadly in humans can infect people without causing symptoms, a new study indicates. It was believed that the parasite Baylisascaris procyonis, or raccoon roundworm, led to severe neurological... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 24, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Chemical that detects plaques in Alzheimer's brains extends lifespan of roundworms
While many anti-aging drugs don't live up to their claim, a tightly replicated study has discovered that a chemical used to detect amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's extended the lifespan of thousands of roundworms similar in molecular form, function and genetics to humans. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

RNA and longevity: Discovering the mechanisms behind aging
(Pohang University of Science& Technology (POSTECH)) Korean researchers suggests that NMD-mediated RNA quality control is critical for longevity in the roundworm called C. elegans, a popularly used animal for aging research. They first discovered that NMD activity decreases during aging. The team then discovered that enhanced NMD underlies the longevity of famous C. elegans strains called daf-2 mutants, which have reduced insulin hormone signaling. This achievement has been published in the world-renowned Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Chemical that detects plaques in Alzheimer's brains extends lifespan of roundworms
(Rutgers University) While many anti-aging drugs don't live up to their claim, a tightly replicated study by Rutgers and a group of researchers from around the country discovered that a chemical used to detect amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's extended the lifespan of thousands of roundworms similar in molecular form, function and genetics to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers identify earliest known protein needed for cell division
(University of Oregon) Researchers from three US universities have identified, using roundworms, the earliest-acting protein known to duplicate the centriole, a tiny cylinder-shaped structure that is a key component of the machinery that organizes cell division in animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Biologists identify reproductive 'traffic cop'
(University of Iowa) University of Iowa researchers have found a protein that regulates how chromosomes pair up and pass genetic information. FDK-6 dictates the speed at which maternal and paternal chromosome strands move and join in roundworms. The findings were published online this month in The Journal of Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes
It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs, according to a study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A study published this week in eLife reveals the mechanism for this sleepiness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 19, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news