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Climate change could wipe out a third of parasite species, study finds
Parasites such as lice and fleas are crucial to ecosystems, scientists say, and extinctions could lead to unpredictable invasionsClimate change could wipe out a third of all parasite species on Earth, according to the most comprehensive analysis to date.Tapeworms, roundworms, ticks, lice and fleas are feared for the diseases they cause or carry, but scientists warn that they also play a vital role in ecosystems. Major extinctions among parasites could lead to unpredictable invasions of surviving parasites into new areas, affecting wildlife and humans and making a “significant contribution” to the sixth mass ext...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Climate change Insects Wildlife Conservation Science Environment Animals World news US news Source Type: news

Undetected infection
(University of California - Santa Barbara) The raccoon that topples your trashcan and pillages your garden may leave more than just a mess. More likely than not, it also contaminates your yard with parasites -- most notably, raccoon roundworms (Baylisascaris procyonis). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How Roundworms Sleep
When Caenorhabditis elegans surrenders to slumber, the majority of its neurons fall silent. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 22, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Worm studies investigate how grandparents' experiences can affect our genes
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Studies of human populations suggest that our health and longevity could be affected by the diets and experiences of our grandparents. But the exact nature of these effects and how they are transmitted across generations remain unclear. In Susan Strome's lab at UC Santa Cruz, research on a tiny roundworm called C. elegans is helping to solve this puzzle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Living long and living well: Is it possible to do both?
(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, are developing metrics to identify the health markers for old age in the roundworm, C. elegans, a popular model in aging research. Their research, which provides insight into the tradeoffs between lifespan and health span, is the subject of a recent paper in Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences, a publication of the Gerontological Society of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study sheds light on link between diseases like Alzheimer's and normal aging in the brain
Neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with protein aggregates, highly intractable clumps of protein. Experiments on roundworms and mouse brain extracts yielded evidence that these disease-associated aggregates can be directly induced by proteins that aggregate together during normal aging. The present study therefore opens up a new area of preventative research targeting these age-dependent protein aggregates as possible therapeutic targets. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study sheds light on link between diseases like Alzheimer's and normal aging in the brain
(Frontiers) Neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with protein aggregates, highly intractable clumps of protein. Experiments on roundworms and mouse brain extracts yielded evidence that these disease-associated aggregates can be directly induced by proteins that aggregate together during normal aging. The present study therefore opens up a new area of preventative research targeting these age-dependent protein aggregates as possible therapeutic targets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study of worms reveals ‘selfish genes’ that encode a toxin – and its antidote
FINDINGSA UCLA study has found that a common strain of  Caenorhabditis elegans — a type of roundworm frequently used in laboratory research on neural development — has a pair of genes that encode both a poison and its antidote. The new research also revealed that if worms with the two genes mate with wild strains of C. elegans that don’t have b oth genes, their offspring who don’t inherit the antidote can’t protect themselves from the toxin — which is produced by mother worms — and die while they are still embryos.The pair of genes represents one of the clearest exam...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What roundworms can teach us about human growth
Human beings and the roundworm C. elegans have more in common than you'd expect. Thanks to a common ancestor more than 700 million years ago humans and roundworms have a similar hormone to drive and regulate growth. By activating or deactivating this hormone scientists can stimulate or stunt the growth of the worms. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In roundworms, fats tip the scales of fertility
Two scientists have discovered how fat levels in a tiny soil-dwelling roundworm (C. elegans) can tip the balance between whether the worm makes eggs or sperm. Although the researchers discovered this phenomenon in worms, the research could have implications for future studies into human fertility and reproductive development. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In roundworms, fats tip the scales of fertility
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Two University of Colorado Boulder scientists have discovered how fat levels in a tiny soil-dwelling roundworm (C. elegans) can tip the balance between whether the worm makes eggs or sperm. Although the researchers discovered this phenomenon in worms, the research could have implications for future studies into human fertility and reproductive development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Olive oil, nuts and avocado can help you live forever
Roundworms were found to become obese and live for two days longer than their svelte counterparts after consuming mono-unsaturated fats, researchers from Stanford University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Monounsaturated fats help roundworms live longer, researchers say
Pudgy roundworms storing a particular type of fat live longer than their more svelte counterparts, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Raccoon Parasite Not as Deadly to Humans as Thought
Researchers find confirmed cases of raccoon roundworm where patients had no symptomsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Animal Diseases and Your Health, Parasitic Diseases (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Raccoon Parasite Not as Deadly to Humans as Thought
FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 -- A raccoon parasite that can be deadly in humans can infect people without causing symptoms, a new study indicates. It was believed that the parasite Baylisascaris procyonis, or raccoon roundworm, led to severe neurological... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 24, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Chemical that detects plaques in Alzheimer's brains extends lifespan of roundworms
While many anti-aging drugs don't live up to their claim, a tightly replicated study has discovered that a chemical used to detect amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's extended the lifespan of thousands of roundworms similar in molecular form, function and genetics to humans. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

RNA and longevity: Discovering the mechanisms behind aging
(Pohang University of Science& Technology (POSTECH)) Korean researchers suggests that NMD-mediated RNA quality control is critical for longevity in the roundworm called C. elegans, a popularly used animal for aging research. They first discovered that NMD activity decreases during aging. The team then discovered that enhanced NMD underlies the longevity of famous C. elegans strains called daf-2 mutants, which have reduced insulin hormone signaling. This achievement has been published in the world-renowned Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Chemical that detects plaques in Alzheimer's brains extends lifespan of roundworms
(Rutgers University) While many anti-aging drugs don't live up to their claim, a tightly replicated study by Rutgers and a group of researchers from around the country discovered that a chemical used to detect amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's extended the lifespan of thousands of roundworms similar in molecular form, function and genetics to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers identify earliest known protein needed for cell division
(University of Oregon) Researchers from three US universities have identified, using roundworms, the earliest-acting protein known to duplicate the centriole, a tiny cylinder-shaped structure that is a key component of the machinery that organizes cell division in animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Biologists identify reproductive 'traffic cop'
(University of Iowa) University of Iowa researchers have found a protein that regulates how chromosomes pair up and pass genetic information. FDK-6 dictates the speed at which maternal and paternal chromosome strands move and join in roundworms. The findings were published online this month in The Journal of Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes
It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) It's well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it's a microscopic roundworm that's providing an explanation of how that occurs, according to a study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A study published this week in eLife reveals the mechanism for this sleepiness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 19, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Worms have teenage ambivalence, too
Scientists find that neurological changes mark transition from ambivalent adolescent to capable adult in the roundworm. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Worms have teenage ambivalence, too
(Salk Institute) Salk scientists find that neurological changes mark transition from ambivalent adolescent to capable adult in the roundworm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Biology ’s'breadboard': Learning about human nervous system with understanding of worm brain
Understanding how the nervous system of the roundworm C elegans works will give insights into how our vastly more complex brains function. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Biology's 'breadboard'
(New York Institute of Technology) Understanding how the nervous system of the roundworm C. elegans works will give insights into how our vastly more complex brains function and is the subject of a paper in Nature Methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Mass. General study reveals how diabetes drug metformin prevents, suppresses cancer growth
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified a pathway that appears to underlie metformin's ability both to block the growth of human cancer cells and to extend the lifespan of the C.elegans roundworm, implying that this single genetic pathway plays an important role in a wide range of organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Controlled Splicing Extends Life Span in Roundworms
Increasing the expression of an RNA splicing factor mimics dietary restriction, prolonging life in nematodes.  (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 7, 2016 Category: Science Tags: Daily News, News & Opinion Source Type: news

Uncovering a'smoking gun' in age-related disease
Aging is a key risk factor for a variety of devastating, chronic diseases, yet the biological factors that influence when and how rapidly cells deteriorate over time remain largely unknown. Now, for the first time, a research team has linked the function of a core component of cells'machinery -- which cuts and rejoins RNA molecules in a process known as " RNA splicing " -- with longevity in the roundworm. The finding sheds light on the biological role of splicing in lifespan and suggests that manipulating specific splicing factors in humans might help promote healthy aging. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Photoreceptor found in worms 50 times better at detecting light rays than human eye
An international team of scientists, led by the University of Michigan, discovered the LITE-1 taste receptor in millimetre-long roundworms, known as nematodes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bacteria discovery offers possible new means of controlling crop pest
(Oregon State University) A bacterium common in insects has been discovered in a plant-parasitic roundworm, opening up the possibility of a new, environmentally friendly way of controlling the crop-damaging pest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 15, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cellular 'cannibalism' may be fundamental to development across evolution
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) In living beings, from roundworms to humans, some cells may ball up unwanted contents on their surfaces for other cells to 'eat.' This is the finding of a study led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and published online Nov. 14 in Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

U.S. FDA Approves Vermox Chewable (Mebendazole) for Treatment of Children and Adults with Roundworm and Whipworm Infections
RARITAN, N.J., October 19, 2016 – Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson& Johnson (Janssen), announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Vermox Chewable... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - October 19, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Roundworms even more useful than researchers previously thought
The one millimetre long roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a model organism in scientific research, and has therefore been extensively examined. A research group has now demonstrated that the worm is an even more complete model system than previously thought, which could enable more detailed research into areas such as early embryonic development. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Parkinson's disease protection may begin in the gut
(University of Iowa) The gut may play a key role in preventing the onset of Parkinson's disease. UI biologists found that in roundworms, an immune response from intestinal cells sparks a series of chemical signals that ultimately preserves neurons whose death is associated with Parkinson's. The results appear in the journal Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Raccoon Roundworm Infection Associated With CNS Disease Raccoon Roundworm Infection Associated With CNS Disease
A roundworm predominantly found in raccoons can result in fatal human disease or severe neurologic outcomes if not diagnosed and treated rapidly.Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - September 26, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Why Humans Are Hard-Wired For Curiosity
By Vivian Hemmelder and Tommy Blanchard, Harvard University This post was originally published on Footnote, a website that brings academic research and ideas to a broader audience. Humans are deeply curious beings. Our lives, economy, and society are shaped so strongly by a drive to obtain information that we are sometimes called informavores: creatures that search for and digest information, just like carnivores hunt and eat meat.1 What is it that drives our hunger for information? From an evolutionary perspective, there is a clear reason why animals would seek out information: it can be vital to their survival and re...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Raccoon Roundworm Infection Associated with Central Nervous System Disease and Ocular Disease — Six States, 2013–2015
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - September 8, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Male chemistry primes females for reproduction -- but at a cost
Scientist have discovered that male animals, through their invisible chemical'essence,'prime female animals for reproduction but with the unfortunate side effect of also hastening females'aging process. The females sense the two signals and respond by altering their physiology. These findings in roundworms, which echo those made in mammalian studies, could lead to therapies that delay puberty and prolong fertility in humans as well as combat aging. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

MGH researchers identify key elements of cellular response to proteasome dysfunction
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have identified key molecules in the pathway by which cells in the C. elegans roundworm sense proteasome dysfunction, findings that may have application to treatment of several human diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 16, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Plastic manufacturing chemical BPS harms egg cells, study suggests
This study clearly illustrates the issue with the ‘whack-a-mole’ approach to chemical replacement in consumer products,” said Patrick Allard, assistant professor of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, and the study’s senior author. “There is a great need for the coordinated safety assessment of multiple substitutes and mixtures of chemicals before their use in product replacement. But the good news is that a number of governmental programs and academic labs are now moving in that direction”. AUTHORS The authors of the study are Yichang Chen, Le Shu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 9, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New research points to novel approach to tackling Ascaris roundworm
(Trinity College Dublin) Scientists have shed new light on Ascaris infection, which affects 1 billion people worldwide. Targeting specific liver proteins may offer new preventative options against an infection that kills around 60.000 people each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 4, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Sex and death insights from a mutant roundworm
All at once, a roundworm overhauls an array of survival strategies, and researchers suspect multiple mutations behind it. But they're surprised when they trace the sweeping changes back to one tiny mutation on a single gene, and find a hint at a genetic regulator of so-called life history trade-offs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sex and death insights from a mutant roundworm
( Georgia Institute of Technology ) All at once, a roundworm overhauls an array of survival strategies, and researchers suspect multiple mutations behind it. But they're surprised when they trace the sweeping changes back to one tiny mutation on a single gene, and find a hint at a genetic regulator of so-called life history trade-offs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 28, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dietary restriction increases lifespan through effects on the gut
Dietary restriction, or limited food intake without malnutrition, has beneficial effects on longevity in many species, including humans. A new study represents a major advance in understanding how dietary restriction leads to these advantages. Using the small roundworm C. elegans as a model, scientists showed that autophagy in the intestine is critical for lifespan extension. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study links developmental, lipid handling pathways in C. elegans
A previously unknown interaction between metabolic pathways in two different tissues within the C.elegans roundworm triggers a key step in maturation, scientists have discovered. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pomegranate compound 'could combat' complications of ageing
Conclusion This was a mixed animal study that aimed to investigate the effect of compounds called urolithins first in roundworms and then rodents. Urolithins are formed during the breakdown of ellagitannins, which are found in pomegranates, nuts and berries. It was not known whether urolithins were just a waste product, or if they had any beneficial effects. The study found that one of the urolithins in particular, urolithin A, seems to improve muscle function in rodents. We do not know conclusively why, but the results suggested this was due to improving the quality of the mitochondria by increasing the rate of destructi...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Medication Source Type: news

Mass. General study links developmental and lipid handling pathways in C. elegans
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A Massachusetts General Hospital research team reports finding that a previously unknown interaction between metabolic pathways in two different tissues within the C.elegans roundworm triggers a key step in maturation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Filarial nematodes taking a fancy to Austria
In Austria, the parasitic roundworms Dirofilaria repens and Dirofilaria immitis are usually considered to be unpleasant souvenirs from travels abroad. A preliminary study has identified indigenous mosquitoes as carriers of Dirofilaria repens, suggesting for the first time that the parasite has become endemic in Eastern Austria. Dirofilaria immitis, commonly known as heartworm, also appears to be on the verge of becoming autochthonous. The slow pace at which the parasites are establishing themselves is probably due in part to the keeping conditions of dogs in Austria. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Impax Announces Availability of EMVERM(TM) (mebendazole) Chewable Tablets, 100 mg
EMVERM Provides a New Option for Patients with Pinworm, Whipworm, Roundworm and Hookworm in Single or Mixed Infections HAYWARD, Calif., April 13, 2016 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Impax Laboratories, Inc. (IPXL)today announced that EMVE... Biopharmaceuticals, Product LaunchImpax Laboratories, EMVERM, mebendazole (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 13, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news