ICYMI: Cancer While Pregnant And Why Predicting Mass Shootings Is Futile
ICYMI Health features what we're reading this week. This week, we tuned in for the stellar first episode of Only Human, a new podcast from WYNC about how health shapes our lives. Podcast host and journalist Mary Harris chronicled her experience having breast cancer while she was pregnant with her second child, and left us more than ready for episode two. In the wake of a mass shooting at Oregon's Umpqua Community College, we spent time with a thoughtful essay, focused on a frustrated Columbia University psychiatrist, who told Science of Us he was finished talking with reporters about the causes of violence i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: Nobel in Medicine Awarded to Parasitic Disease Drug Pioneers
[MMV] Today, the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded half the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Dr Youyou Tu for her work on artemisinin - the basis of current first-line treatment for malaria - and the other half jointly to Prof. William Campbell and Prof. Satoshi Ōmura for their work on ivermectin to treat river blindness and lymphatic filariasis. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - October 7, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Merck Congratulates Awardees of 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for Discovery Leading to River Blindness Treatment
Dateline City: KENILWORTH, N.J. Co-recipient Dr. William C. Campbell Conducted his Nobel Prize-winning Work at Merck Research Laboratories KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, proudly congratulates William C. Campbell, a retired scientist from Merck Research Laboratories, who was jointly named the 2015 Nobel Prize winner in Physiology or Medicine with Satoshi Omura for the discovery of avermectin, which led to Merck’s development of Mectizan (ivermectin), a tr...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - October 5, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Corporate News Corporate Responsibility News Latest News Source Type: news

Three scientists win Nobel for anti-parasite drugs
Campbell, Ōmura and Tu recognised for their therapies against malaria, elephantiasis and river blindness. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - October 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Nobel prize in medicine goes to pioneers in parasitic diseases – as it happened
The first of three prestigious science prizes on the first day of Nobel week are revealed: William Campbell and Satoshi Omura for their work on a therapy against roundworm, shared with Youyou Tu, for a therapy against malaria 12.02pm BST We’re now bringing down the curtain on this blog. Read the latest story on today’s winners here. Tomorrow it’s the Nobel Prize for Physics – join us again. 12.00pm BST Sarah Bosely has some details on avermectins, the drugs combating some parasites developed by Campbell and Ōmura.The avermectins are a group of naturally occurring compounds, which have strong insect...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 5, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample and Peter Walker Tags: Nobel prizes Medical research Science Science prizes People in science Neuroscience Source Type: news

2015 Nobel Prize In Medicine Awarded For Discovery Of Malaria, River Blindness Drugs From Nature
This year's medicine prize surprisingly goes to scientists who discovered drugs for parasitic infections causing elephantiasis, river blindness, and malaria. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 5, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: David Kroll Source Type: news

International Coalition Urges Final Push to Eliminate River Blindness from the Americas
Dateline City: WASHINGTON, ATLANTA, & KENILWORTH, N.J. Country efforts supported by a major public-private partnership - including The Carter Center/OEPA, PAHO/WHO, and Merck & Co., Inc.’s Mectizan Donation Program - bring the region closer to achieving the elimination goal by 2020 Mexico latest country to receive verification of elimination by World Health Organization WASHINGTON, ATLANTA, & KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Carter Center, PAHO/WHO and the Mectizan Donation Program of Merck & Co., Inc. k...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - September 29, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Corporate News Corporate Responsibility News Latest News Source Type: news

Nigeria: FG Commences Advocacy to Arrest Increasing Rate of River Blindness, Elephantiasis
[This Day] The Federal Ministry of Health has commenced advocacy to arrest increasing rate of onchocerciasis - river blindness and lymphatic filariar - elephantiasis in the country. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 21, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: 'Our Grassroots Healthcare Needs Urgent Attention'
[Daily Trust] Makurdi -Dr. Cecilia Ojabo is the Commissioner for Health and Human Services in Benue State. In this interview, she speaks on the pathetic situation of the primary healthcare in the state. Ojabo who is also an associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Benue State University Teaching Hospital (BSUTH) said the state is a hyper endemic area for onchocerciasis (River Blindness). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 1, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

$7 million grant aids efforts to eliminate neglected tropical diseases
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a $7 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation aimed at eliminating river blindness and elephantiasis, two neglected tropical diseases that annually sicken millions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 13, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Global Health: Fight Against Tropical Diseases Is Framed as Efficient
A consortium argued that every $1 invested in fighting neglected tropical diseases would generate $50 to almost $200 in productivity gains by 2030. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - July 27, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Trachoma Onchocerciasis (Disease) Neglected tropical diseases Parasites Leishmaniasis Medicine and Health Lymphatic Filariasis Worms Source Type: news

Global Health: Fight Against Tropical Diseases Is Framed as Efficient
A consortium argued that every $1 invested in fighting neglected tropical diseases would generate $50 to almost $200 in productivity gains by 2030. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Trachoma Onchocerciasis (Disease) Neglected tropical diseases Parasites Leishmaniasis Medicine and Health Lymphatic Filariasis Worms Source Type: news

Angola: Minsa Trains Trainers for Mapping Diseases That Cause Blindness
[ANGOP] Luanda -The Ministry of Health (MINSA) will hold from 7-9 July in Luanda, a seminar of technical training for the coordinated mapping of Onchocerciasis and Loase, diseases affecting mainly people living along the rivers, for better management of diseases causing blindness. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 5, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Carter Center Gets $10 Million Gift to Fight River Blindness
Nigerian businessman and philanthropist Sir Emeka Offor has donated $10 million to the Carter Center—the humanitarian nonprofit founded by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter—to help eradicate river blindness in his country by 2020. (Source: WSJ.com: Health)
Source: WSJ.com: Health - June 15, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: FREE Source Type: news

Nigeria: Philanthropist Sir Emeka Offor Donates $10 Million to Accelerate Jimmy Carter's Efforts to Help Eliminate River Blindness in Nigeria
[Carter Center] Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and businessman Sir Emeka Offor signed an agreement today for a partnership to eliminate river blindness (onchocerciasis) from seven states in Nigeria where The Carter Center works with the Federal Ministry of Health, including Sir Emeka's native state, Anambra. The project is made possible by grant support of USD$10 million from the Sir Emeka Offor Foundation (SEOF). It will help reach the goal of eliminating river blindness from the world's most endemic country by 2020. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 12, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: Philanthropist Emeka Offor Donates $10 Million to Accelerate Jimmy Carter's Efforts to Eliminate River Blindness
[Carter Center] Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and businessman Sir Emeka Offor signed an agreement today for a partnership to eliminate river blindness (onchocerciasis) from seven states in Nigeria where The Carter Center works with the Federal Ministry of Health, including Sir Emeka's native state, Anambra. The project is made possible by grant support of USD$10 million from the Sir Emeka Offor Foundation (SEOF). It will help reach the goal of eliminating river blindness from the world's most endemic country by 2020. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 12, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

This App Transforms Smartphones Into Cheap, Mobile Laboratories To Detect Parasites In The Blood
WASHINGTON (AP) — Prick a finger and have the blood checked for parasites — by smartphone? Scientists are turning those ubiquitous phones into microscopes and other medical tools that could help fight diseases in remote parts of the world. In the newest work, University of California, Berkeley, researchers used a smartphone-run video microscope to target a challenge in parts of Central Africa — some devastating infections caused by tiny parasitic worms. A small pilot study in Cameroon showed the device could measure within minutes certain worms wriggling in a finger-prick of blood, rapidly identifying wh...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 7, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Smartphone app used to scan blood for parasites
Conclusion This study suggests a new smartphone-based approach could provide a quick way of measuring levels of infection with the Loa loa worm in blood samples, and with a high level of accuracy. This technique could allow assessment of people's infection in communities without easy access to the laboratory testing that is usually used to detect the worms. This is important, as people with high levels of this infection can suffer potentially fatal side effects with the drug ivermectin, which is used to treat two other parasitic infections. It's worth bearing in mind that this was a pilot study in only 33 people using a ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Source Type: news

The Smartphone In Your Pocket Could Help Treat River Blindness For Millions
You may not have realized it, but you quite possibly have a video microscope in your pocket with the potential to indicate treatment for hundreds of thousands of blind individuals throughout the world and millions more at risk for blindness. All you need is an app and a handheld device you could probably assemble in your basement with $100 in parts. And a ticket to sub-Saharan Africa, where most of the need is. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - May 7, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tara Haelle Source Type: news

Mobile phone microscope rapidly detects parasite levels in blood
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and the University of California, Berkeley, and colleagues have developed a mobile phone microscope to measure blood levels of the parasitic filarial worm Loa loa. The point-of-care device may enable safe resumption of mass drug administration campaigns to eradicate the parasitic diseases onchocerciasis (river blindness) and lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 6, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What the Gates Foundation Has Achieved, 15 Years On
There are a whole lot of things you may or may not get to do in the next 15 years, but a few of them you can take for granted: eating, for one. Having access to a bank, for another. And then there’s the simple business of not dying of a preventable or treatable disease. Good for you—and good for most of us in the developed world. But the developed world isn’t the whole story. The bad—and familiar—news is that developing nations lag far behind in income, public health, food production, education and more. The much, much better news is that all of that is changing—and fast. The just-releas...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Africa child mortality cholera climate crops Disease Economics Education Food Gates Foundation global health Malaria measles mobile banking polio seeds Source Type: news

DNDi receives US$10 million from USAID to develop new drugs for neglected filaria patients
(Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative) The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative has been awarded US$ 10 million by the United States Agency for International Development to develop new treatments for onchocerciasis, better known as river blindness, and lymphatic filariasis, better known as elephantitis -- the first-ever USAID grant for neglected tropical disease research and development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 16, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

COUNTDOWN Research Consortium calls 'time' on NTDs
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) The COUNTDOWN research consortium has been launched today following a £7 million grant allocation from the UK Department for International Development earlier in the year.As part of the push towards universal access to health services, there is international consensus that NTDs such as onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, schistosomiasis and trachoma, must be tackled more effectively and NTD control programs need more assistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 15, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bayer to support DNDi on oral drug development for river blindness
Bayer HealthCare has agreed to provide the ingredient emodepside to support Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) in its effort to develop a new oral drug to treat river blindness, also known as onchocerciasis. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - December 11, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Bayer and DNDi sign agreement to develop an oral treatment for river blindness
(Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative) Bayer HealthCare and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative have signed an agreement under which Bayer will provide the active ingredient emodepside to support DNDi in its effort to develop a new oral drug to treat river blindness (or onchocerciasis). The world's second leading infectious cause of blindness, river blindness is a neglected tropical disease caused by a filarial worm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 9, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New test will combat major cause of preventable blindness in Africa
(PATH) PATH, an international nonprofit organization, announces the availability of a point-of care diagnostic tool for Onchocerciasis, commonly known as river blindness. It is the first in a suite of diagnostic innovations by PATH intended to support the elimination of neglected tropical diseases, a group of illnesses that affect more than a billion people worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

African Nodding Syndrome Disease May be Spread by Blackflies
Despite decades of research, scientists have yet to pinpoint the exact cause of nodding syndrome (NS), a disabling disease affecting African children. A new report suggests that blackflies infected with the parasite Onchocerca volvulus may be capable of passing on a secondary pathogen that is to blame for the spread of the disease. New research is presented in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - October 6, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Africa Source Type: news

Merck Congratulates Ecuador as Second Country to Receive PAHO/WHO Verification of Elimination of River Blindness
Dateline City: WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, applauds the government of Ecuador on being the second country in the world to receive World Health Organization (WHO) verification of the elimination of river blindness (onchocerciasis) using MECTIZAN® (ivermectin). Language: English Contact: MerckJennifer Woodruff, 267-305-3550 Ticker Slug: Ticker: M...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - October 3, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Corporate News Corporate Responsibility News Latest News Source Type: news

Blackflies may be responsible for spreading nodding syndrome
Despite decades of research, scientists have yet to pinpoint the exact cause of nodding syndrome (NS), a disabling disease affecting African children. A new report suggests that blackflies infected with the parasite Onchocerca volvulus may be capable of passing on a secondary pathogen that is to blame for the spread of the disease. When present, the first indication of the disease is an involuntary nodding of the head, followed by epileptic seizures. The condition can cause cognitive deterioration, stunted growth, and in some cases, death. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 2, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Blackflies may be responsible for spreading nodding syndrome
(Elsevier Health Sciences) Despite decades of research, scientists have yet to pinpoint the exact cause of nodding syndrome, a disabling disease affecting African children. A new report suggests that blackflies infected with the parasite Onchocerca volvulus may be capable of passing on a secondary pathogen that is to blame for the spread of the disease. New research is presented in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 2, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ghana: Neglected Tropical Diseases Causing Havoc in Ghana
[Ghanaian Chronicle]About 12 million people living in 98 districts in Ghana stand the risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis). Four million others, from 63 districts are also at risk of being infected with onchocerciasis (river blindness), according to the Ministry of Health. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 18, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cameroon: Cameroon to Strengthen River Blindness Prevention
[Cameroon Tribune]The Director of Africa's Onchocerciasis Control Progamme was at the Ministry of Public Health on April 29, 2014. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 6, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: NTDs - Attention Heightens for Elephantiasis, River Blindness, 8 Others
[Vanguard]THEy are 10 in number - all physiologically complex and pathologically dangerous vector-borne diseases. The mode of their action is diabolical. The menace of their effect on health and wellbeing is debasing. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 22, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Africa: Carter Center Marks Progress in Fight Against Guinea Worm, River Blindness
[VOA]Chicago -Guinea worm disease and river blindness are among 17 tropical diseases the World Health Organization considers neglected. Thanks to the efforts of the Atlanta-based Carter Center - founded by former president Jimmy Carter and his wife Rosalynn - focused treatment and prevention are leading to the elimination of one, and the extinction of another. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

LSTM-Eisai-UoL awarded GHIT Fund to deliver anti-Wolbachia drug discovery
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine together with colleagues at the Department of Chemistry (University of Liverpool) and Japanese pharmaceutical company Eisai are pleased to announce that they have been award a Global Health Innovative Technology Fund to develop new drugs to target lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Weak spot of parasitic worms attacked to cure tropical diseases
(University of Liverpool) Researchers are developing new drug treatments to tackle river blindness and elephantiasis, which affect up to 150 million people across the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

River blindness: 'you never sleep'
The machete blades turned red with heat in the fire that the rubber workers built on a Liberia plantation, Thomas Unnasch remembers from a visit in the 1980s. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

According to the WHO, Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) affect over 1 billion people worldwide, and are devastating to patients in the developing world. What is being done to get treatments to these patients and to speed development of new treatments?
conversationsneglected tropical diseasestropical diseasesnew medicinesInnovationOpinion46864687468846894690469246914693Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) impact more than a billion people in some of the poorest, most remote parts of the world, blinding, disabling, disfiguring and sickening those infected. They have a negative impact on life expectancy, productivity and childhood education -- all of which create a cycle of poverty and stigma for affected communities. Today, because of renewed and new commitments, millions impacted by NTDs are being treated, several NTDs are being controlled effectively, and some even elimin...
Source: PHRMA - December 10, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Stephen Source Type: news

[Press Release] Deadly Gaps Persist in New Drug Development for Neglected Diseases
This study reports a slight increase of 2.4 new products/year for 2000-2011 and predicts 4.7 new products/year through 2018. "Although strides have been made in the last decade, we still see deadly gaps in new medicines for some of the world's least visible patients," said Dr. Nathalie Strub-Wourgaft, medical director of DNDi.  "We need to get more treatment candidates, NCEs or existing ones for repurposing, into and through the R&D pipeline to fundamentally change the way we manage these diseases."   "Our patients are still waiting for true medical breakthroughs," said D...
Source: MSF News - December 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Pharma Technology Focus - Issue 25
In this issue we look at the personalised medicine revolution, investigate the tireless work on the elimination of malaria, catch up with a campaign to eliminate river blindness and much more (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - October 24, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Deadly Gaps Persist in New Drug Development for Neglected Diseases
This study reports a slight increase of 2.4 new products/year for 2000-2011 and predicts 4.7 new products/year through 2018. "Although strides have been made in the last decade, we still see deadly gaps in new medicines for some of the world's least visible patients," said Dr. Nathalie Strub-Wourgaft, medical director of DNDi.  "We need to get more treatment candidates, NCEs or existing ones for repurposing, into and through the R&D pipeline to fundamentally change the way we manage these diseases."   "Our patients are still waiting for true medical breakthroughs," said D...
Source: MSF News - October 24, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Colombia's successful quest to cure river blindness
In July, Colombia's Government announced it had become the first country in the world to completely eliminate onchocerciasis, also known as river blindness. This milestone serves as a model of success for other Latin American and African nations work… (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - October 10, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How to eliminate river blindness: lessons from Colombia
Colombia recently eliminated this neglected disease through health education and drugs. Sound easy? Here's how other countries can follow suitMy homeland of Colombia recently became the first country in the Americas to wipe out onchocerciasis (river blindness) and the first in the world to be granted 'verification of elimination' status by the World Health Organisation. Colombia rid itself of the neglected tropical disease, that affects millions across 35 countries worldwide, through health education and use of the drug ivermectin.Eliminating a disease from a nation is complex. It requires community-based health education ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 1, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Global health Blogposts Guardian Professional Colombia Americas World news Infectious diseases Pharmaceuticals industry Malaria and infectious diseases Medical research Health policy Global development professionals network World H Source Type: news

Colombia is first country in the world to eliminate river blindness
Colombia has been verified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as having eliminated onchocerciasis (known as "river blindness"), thus becoming the first country in the world to achieve this goal. In an official notification letter, WHO Director-General, Margaret Chan, congratulated the Government of Colombia and urged it to "maintain vigilance to detect any future outbreaks" of the disease, which continues to circulate in other countries of Latin America. Dr. Carissa F... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Merck Applauds Colombia for First PAHO/WHO Verification of Elimination of River Blindness
Dateline City:  WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. Historic Milestone Reflects Successful Collaboration Among MECTIZAN® Donation Program and Partners WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, applauds the government of Colombia whose work with the MECTIZAN® Donation Program and The Carter Center-sponsored Onchocerciasis Elimination Program for the Americas led to today’s Pan American Health Organization, the World Health Organization’s Regional Office ...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - July 29, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: hq_site_admin Tags: Corporate News Corporate Responsibility News Latest News Source Type: news

Cameroon: Benoit Assou Ekotto Administers Mectizan
[Cameroon Tribune]Cameroon's Indomitable Lions venerable defender and player for Tottenham in the English soccer league, Benoit Assou Ekotto administered the 250millionth Mectizan drug in Bali on Monday July 8, 2013 to six-year old Nabila and other members of her family. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 12, 2013 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Carter Center Declares Goal: River Blindness Elimination
The Carter Center has announced that it will no longer only control river blindness, but instead it will work with ministries of health to eliminate it in all 10 countries in Africa and Latin America in the areas where the Center fights the neglected disease. Spread by the bites of black flies that breed in rapidly flowing streams, river blindness (onchocerciasis) is a dreadful eye and skin disease affecting millions of the poorest people around the world. "River blindness can and should be eliminated, not just controlled, even in the most afflicted areas of Africa," said former U.S... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Progress Toward Elimination of OnchocerciasisProgress Toward Elimination of Onchocerciasis
How successful are countries around the world at eliminating onchocerciasis? This new study takes a look at strategies and success rates. Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Progress Toward Elimination of Onchocerciasis in the Americas — 1993–2012
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - May 23, 2013 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Uganda: New Study Highlights Need to Continue Fight Against River Blindness
[ASTMH]Researchers report onchocerciasis (river blindness) could make a comeback in Northwestern Uganda if annual drug distributions to fight the disease are stopped. The study, conducted in the endemic region of Nyagak-Bondo, showed that while there was a significant reduction in infection after 18 years of community-based treatment with the deworming medication ivermectin, transmission has not been interrupted. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 21, 2013 Category: African Health Source Type: news