Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 235
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 235 and infectious diseases / animal theme. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1: What tropical disease will give you Leopard or Lizard skin? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('dde...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 26, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five bull neck diphtheria Elephantiasis leonine facies leopard skin leprosy lion facies lizard skin lymphatic filariasis marasmus monkey facies onchocerciasis Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 224
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 224. Question 1 Which children’s author wrote “The Pocket Book of Boners”? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet789838069'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink789838069')) Dr Seuss It was one of the be...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five boners coffee cups Dr Seuss Dr Thomas Neill Cream faecal matter mazzotti reaction onchocerciasis penile injury Zippers Source Type: blogs

Are Priority Review Vouchers The Answer To Incentivize Drug Development? Not So Fast.
In the May issue of Health Affairs, two papers examine the potential for voucher systems to incentivize drug development in areas of unmet medical need. Co-authors Kevin Outterson and Anthony McDonnell take a look at potential exclusivity voucher programs designed to encourage development of new antibiotics, while David Ridley and Stephane Régnier analyze the effects that expansion of existing priority review voucher (PRV) programs may have on the value of PRVs as a development incentive. Ridley and Régnier’s work is of particular importance as both houses of Congress pursue a spate of legislative propo...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 15, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Pranav Aurora, Morgan Romine and Gregory Daniel Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Global Health Health Professionals Quality FDA FDAAA priority review rare diseases Source Type: blogs

Voices for Vaccines: 11 Facts Show How it’s a Propaganda Ploy for Emory University, CDC, and Big Pharma
Conclusion The Voices for Vaccines program at the Task Force for Global Health may be administered by a few mothers, but they are not the ones pulling the strings behind the scenes. The information in this article reveals who keeps the lights on for the website and the Task Force organization as a whole. Furthermore, the past, present and future relationships with the Centers for Disease Control, Emory University, and pharmaceutical companies should immediately raise a red flag for any parent. Especially when the message calls for you to blindly trust doctors injecting dangerous chemicals into your child. If you want to ta...
Source: vactruth.com - February 19, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Jeffry John Aufderheide Tags: Jeffry John Aufderheide Top Stories Alan Hinman Deborah Wexler Emory University Paul Offit Stanley Plotkin Task Force for Global Health U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Voices for Vaccines Source Type: blogs

Futuristic Private Patient Rooms and Low-Tech Health Innovation: The Battle
Whenever I give an interview about the future of medicine and current global trends, the question whether wealthier people would have even better care always comes up. Obviously, this is a crucial issue. But I take it to a next level. In the future, not just richer people will get better care but will also have a chance to become superhuman by implanting and using expensive medical innovations from augmented reality-based contact lenses to artificial organs. Although, there will always be a battle between the major motivation behind creating better experience for the rich (money) and the motivation behind designing innovat...
Source: ScienceRoll - August 26, 2013 Category: Geneticists and Genetics Commentators Authors: Dr. Bertalan Meskó Tags: Future Health 2.0 Innovation Medicine Medicine 2.0 Healthcare low-tech patient room Source Type: blogs

A Mission to One of the Most Devastated Places in the World
By Josh Skaggs, MD   I went on a medical mission to East Africa’s South Sudan this past January and February. The country is one of the most undeveloped, isolated, and devastated places in the world, and it was an amazing experience even though being there was incredibly tough.   South Sudan and Sudan used to be under the control of Egypt, and were overseen by Great Britain. Great Britain withdrew from Sudan, its former colony, in 1956. Sudan had two regions at that time, the Arab north and the tribal south. War broke out after the northern Sudanese government began killing all non-Arabs in the south wh...
Source: Going Global - July 15, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Mission to One of the Most Devastated Places in the World
By Josh Skaggs, MD   I went on a medical mission to East Africa’s South Sudan this past January and February. The country is one of the most undeveloped, isolated, and devastated places in the world, and it was an amazing experience even though being there was incredibly tough.   South Sudan and Sudan used to be under the control of Egypt, and were overseen by Great Britain. Great Britain withdrew from Sudan, its former colony, in 1956. Sudan had two regions at that time, the Arab north and the tribal south. War broke out after the northern Sudanese government began killing all non-Arabs in the south who wo...
Source: Going Global - July 15, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

How Drug Companies Keep Medicine Out of Reach - The Atlantic
http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/05/how-drug-companies-keep-medicine-out-of-reach/275853/?ReutersFor almost a decade, the United States has been standing in the way of an idea that could lead to cures for some of the world's most devastating illnesses. The class of maladies is known as neglected diseases, and they almost exclusively affect those in the developing world. The same idea, if realized, might also be used in more affluent nations to goad the pharmaceutical industry into producing critical innovations that the free market has yet to produce - things like new antibiotics, which are likely to be used ...
Source: PharmaGossip - May 15, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs