Griseofulvin and Fluconazole Reduce Transmission of Tinea Capitis in Schoolchildren
ConclusionsNo statistically significant differences were found between treatment groups. Griseofulvin and fluconazole reduced the potential for disease transmission in children with TC, with griseofulvin being more effective for M. canis infections, although children with TC may be potentially contagious even after up to 3 weeks of treatment. These data should be considered regarding school attendance of children with TC. (Source: Pediatric Dermatology)
Source: Pediatric Dermatology - July 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Avner Shemer, Marcello H. Grunwald, Aditya K. Gupta, Anna Lyakhovitsky, Carlton Ralph Daniel, Boaz Amichai Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

An ultrastructural study on corkscrew hairs and cigarette‐ash‐shaped hairs observed by dermoscopy of tinea capitis
This study was aimed to explain the formation mechanisms of corkscrew hairs and cigarette‐ash‐shaped hairs observed by dermoscopy of tinea capitis. In the present work, the ultrastructure of the involved hairs collected from a girl with tinea capitis caused by Trichophyton violaceum was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). SEM observation of the corkscrew hair revealed bent hair shaft and asymmetrically disrupted cuticle layer. TEM findings demonstrated the hair shaft became weak. The corkscrew hairs closely covered by scales on the scalp were observed under dermosc...
Source: Scanning - July 1, 2015 Category: Radiology Authors: Mao Lu, Yuping Ran, Yaling Dai, Song Lei, Chaoliang Zhang, Kaiwen Zhuang, Wenying Hu Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Evaluation of two molecular techniques for rapid detection of main dermatophyte agents of tinea capitis
ConclusionsThe two techniques were sufficiently specific and sensitive for discriminating target DNA of T. violaceum and M. canis from that of closely related dermatophytes. RCA and MLPA are advantageous in their reliability and ease of operation compared to standard PCR and conventional methods.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: British Journal of Dermatology)
Source: British Journal of Dermatology - July 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: S. Deng, Z. Zhou, G.S. de Hoog, X. Wang, P. Abliz, J. Sun, M.J. Najafzadeh, W. Pan, W. Lei, S. Zhu, H. Hasimu, P. Zhang, Y. Guo, D. Deng, W. Liao Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Prevalence of Tinea capitis in school going children from Mathare, informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya
Conclusion: This study demonstrates a high prevalence of Tinea infections with Trichophyton tonsurans as the predominant etiological agent in school going children of the urban slums of Nairobi. (Source: BMC Research Notes)
Source: BMC Research Notes - June 27, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Jedidah MotoJohn MaingiAnthony Nyamache Source Type: research

Notes from the field: outbreak of skin lesions among high school wrestlers - Arizona, 2014.
Abstract Skin infections are a common problem among athletes at all levels of competition; among wrestlers, 8.5% of all adverse events are caused by skin infections. Wrestlers are at risk because of the constant skin-to-skin contact required during practice and competition. The most common infections transmitted among high school wrestlers include fungal infections (e.g., ringworm), the viral infection herpes gladiatorum caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), and bacterial infections (e.g., impetigo) caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus species, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal aureus (MRSA)....
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - May 29, 2015 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Williams C, Wells J, Klein R, Sylvester T, Sunenshine R Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research

Dermoscopic features in 12 cats with dermatophytosis and in 12 cats with self-induced alopecia due to other causes: an observational descriptive study.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: This observational descriptive study suggests that dermoscopy may represent a helpful noninvasive in vivo technique in the differential diagnosis of patchy alopecia in cats. PMID: 25988302 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Veterinary Dermatology)
Source: Veterinary Dermatology - May 19, 2015 Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Scarampella F, Zanna G, Peano A, Fabbri E, Tosti A Tags: Vet Dermatol Source Type: research

Generalized Favus: The Story of a Legendary Case of Tinea Favosa
Publication date: Available online 7 May 2015 Source:Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition) Author(s): L. Conde-Salazar Gómez , F. Heras Mendaza From the moment the Olavide Museum opened its doors in 1882 until its content was packed up around 1965 and lost sight of for a time, it underwent a succession of changes. Some of those changes cannot be fully documented now because the archives of the Provincial Council (Diputación) of Madrid were lost during the Spanish Civil War. The museum was initially housed in Hospital de San Juan de Dios, in the neighborhood of Atocha. Because this hospital tr...
Source: Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas - May 8, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Update On Common Childhood Skin Infections
A literature review and clinical commentary on diagnosis and treatment of common childhood bacterial, fungal and viral skin infections is presented including impetigo, folliculitis, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, tinea capitis, warts and molluscum contagiosum. (Source: Journal of Infection)
Source: Journal of Infection - April 29, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Arnold P. Oranje, Flora B. de Waard-van der Spek Source Type: research

Recent developments in the management of common childhood skin infections
A literature review and clinical commentary on diagnosis and treatment of common childhood bacterial, fungal and viral skin infections is presented including impetigo, folliculitis, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, tinea capitis, warts and molluscum contagiosum. (Source: Journal of Infection)
Source: Journal of Infection - April 29, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Arnold P. Oranje, Flora B. de Waard-van der Spek Source Type: research

Mycology – an update Part 3: Dermatomycoses: topical and systemic therapy
Summary Treatment of dermatophyte infections is based on the clinical picture and mycological detection of the causative pathogen. Based on the appropriate indication, onychomycosis can be treated topically using an antimycotic nail lacquer. Atraumatic nail abrasion with 40 % urea ointment has a beneficial effect on healing. Continuous treatment of onychomycosis with terbinafine represents the most effective systemic therapy. Terbinafine or itraconazole are the safest and most effective antimycotic agents for the treatment of onychomycosis in children. For laser therapy of onychomycosis, only a few studies on clinical effi...
Source: JDDG - April 27, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Pietro Nenoff, Constanze Krüger, Uwe Paasch, Gabriele Ginter‐Hanselmayer Tags: CME Article Source Type: research

Mykologie – ein Update Teil 3: Dermatomykosen: Topische und systemische Behandlung
Zusammenfassung Die Behandlung der Dermatophytosen basiert auf dem klinischen Bild und dem mykologischen Erregernachweis. Die Onychomykose kann bei richtiger Indikationsstellung topisch mit antimykotischem Nagellack behandelt werden. Die atraumatische Nagelabrasion mit 40 % Harnstoff‐Salbe hat einen günstigen Einfluss auf die Heilung. Die kontinuierliche Behandlung der Onychomykose mit Terbinafin ist die wirksamste systemische Therapieform. Terbinafin oder Itraconazol sind die sichersten und wirksamsten Antimykotika zur Behandlung der Onychomykose im Kindesalter. Zur Lasertherapie der Onychomykose liegen bislan...
Source: JDDG - April 27, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Pietro Nenoff, Constanze Krüger, Uwe Paasch, Gabriele Ginter‐Hanselmayer Tags: CME‐Artikel Source Type: research

Profil épidémiologique des teignes du cuir chevelu à Dakar (Sénégal). Bilan d’une étude rétrospective de six ans (2008–2013)
Conclusion Ces résultats ont montré une diminution de l’incidence annuelle des TCC pendant la période d’étude et une augmentation nette des teignes trichophytiques. Cette étude a aussi montré que les TCC sont des dermatophyties fréquentes au Sénégal et touchent surtout les jeunes femmes d’âge compris entre 20 et 29ans. Introduction Tinea capitis is considered as a public health problem in Senegal. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the incidence, the mycological and epidemiological aspects of tinea capitis diagnosed...
Source: Journal of Medical Mycology - April 25, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Majocchi's granuloma - Case report
We report the case of a three-year-old child who, following long term treatment with topical corticosteroids and their associations for a case of ringworm on the face developed a form of folliculitis known as Majocchi's Granuloma. Treatment with oral Griseofulvin was successful. (Source: Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia)
Source: Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia - April 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Updating the epidemiology of dermatophyte infections in Palestine with special reference to concomitant dermatophytosis
Conclusions The epidemiology of dermatophytosis, especially tinea capitis, has gone the most radical changes in Palestine in the last three decades, with M. canis replacing T. violaceum, and becoming the predominant causative agent of all cases of infections. The coexistence of tinea pedis with other types of fungal skin infections is a frequent phenomenon; we believe that the infected foot may be a site of primary infection. Thus, the effective therapy for tinea pedis is essential to prevent spreading the infection to other sites of the skin. (Source: Journal of Medical Mycology)
Source: Journal of Medical Mycology - March 30, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: research

Case of dermatophyte abscess caused by Trichophyton rubrum: a case report and review of the literature
Summary A 54‐year‐old Japanese man without apparent immunosuppression presented with nodules with purulent drainage on the right lower leg. He had ringworm of the right leg and tinea unguium. A biopsy specimen of the nodule showed intradermal abscesses with fungal elements, and Trichophyton rubrum was cultured from both the pus and the biopsy specimen. Treatment with oral terbinafine resolved the nodules. Dermatophyte abscess is a rare, deep and invasive dermatophytosis, which is often associated with immunocompromised conditions. We provide a review of the literature including Japanese cases. (Source: Mycoses)
Source: Mycoses - March 19, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Makoto Inaoki, Chihiro Nishijima, Miho Miyake, Toshiyuki Asaka, Youichi Hasegawa, Kazushi Anzawa, Takashi Mochizuki Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Trichophyton violaceum isolated from tinea capitis patients
Conclusions Posaconazole, terbinafine and voriconazole were shown to be the most potent antifungal agents against T. violaceum isolates obtained from tinea capitis patients worldwide. These results might help clinicians in developing appropriate therapies that have a high probability of successfully treating tinea capitis due to T. violaceum. (Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy)
Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy - March 11, 2015 Category: Microbiology Authors: Deng, S., de Hoog, G. S., Verweij, P. E., Zoll, J., Ilkit, M., Morsali, F., Abliz, P., Wang, X., Zhan, P., Yang, L., Hasimu, H., Liao, W., Pan, W., Seyedmousavi, S. Tags: Original research Source Type: research

Evolution of tinea capitis in the Nanchang area, Southern China: a 50‐year survey (1965–2014)
Summary Tinea capitis remains a common public health problem worldwide especially in developing areas. Aetiologic agents and clinical pattern vary with geography and history of socioeconomic conditions. Three community surveys and a prospective study were carried out over the past 50 years (1965–2014) in the Qingyunpu District of Nanchang, Southern China. Clinical presentation and spectrum of aetiological agents were monitored to understand the evolution of tinea capitis. In 1965 favus was highly epidemic and Trichophyton schoenleinii presented as the overwhelming aetiological agents of scalp infection in the st...
Source: Mycoses - March 10, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Ping Zhan, Chengfang Geng, Zhihua Li, Yun Jin, Qing Jiang, Li Tao, Yunpeng Luo, Zhiwei Xiong, Shaoxi Wu, Dongmei Li, Weida Liu, G. Sybren Hoog Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Trichophyton tonsurans infection in Japan: Epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and infection control
Abstract In this review, we summarize the status of Trichophyton tonsurans infection in Japan in terms of epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and infection control. Since approximately 2000, outbreaks of T. tonsurans infections among combat sports club members have been reported frequently, with the infection then spreading to their friends and family members. The most common clinical features of T. tonsurans infection are tinea corporis, which is difficult to differentiate from eczema, and tinea capitis. Tinea capitis is classified as the seborrheic form, kerion celsi form or “black dot” form,...
Source: The Journal of Dermatology - March 4, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Junichiro Hiruma, Yumi Ogawa, Masataro Hiruma Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

A 10‐Year Study of Dermatophytoses in Isfahan, Iran
Dermatophyte infections are very common worldwide and their epidemiological characteristics vary according to the geographical region and have altered in the last decades. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the diversity of causative agents of dermatophytoses and describe the epidemiological condition of infection in Isfahan, Iran, between 2003 and 2012. Specimens were collected from hair, nail, and skin and were examined by conventional methods such as direct microscopy, culture on sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol and cycloheximide (Mycosel agar) and sabouraud glucose agar, Trichophyton agar...
Source: Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis - March 1, 2015 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Mostafa Chadeganipour, Rasoul Mohammadi, Shahla Shadzi Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Are Dermatophytid Reactions in Patients with Kerion Celsi Much More Common Than Previously Thought? A Prospective Study
Abstract Dermatophytid reactions are secondary eruptions in response to dermatophytosis. Only a few cases demonstrating an association between dermatophytid reactions and tinea capitis have been reported. Dermatophytid reactions were evaluated in patients diagnosed with kerion celsi. Patients admitted to the dermatology clinic of Van Regional Training and Research Hospital between November 22, 2012, and July 1, 2013, diagnosed with kerion celsi were evaluated for dermatophytid reactions. Six girls (32%) and 13 boys (68%) were included in this study. Dermatophytid reactions were detected in 13 of the 19 patients (68%). Seve...
Source: Pediatric Dermatology - February 12, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Filiz Topaloğlu Demir, Ayse Serap Karadag Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Scalp conditions
Answers to the following questions can be found on page 54. Select one best answer from the following: Seborrhoeic dermatitis Scalp psoriasis Kerion celsi Trichotillomania Alopecia areata Tinea capitis Question 1 Case 1: A 5-year-old boy presented with a 30-day history of an asymptomatic area of brittle, lustreless hair, which broke easily after emergence from the scalp. He had no significant past medical history. His family had acquired a domestic cat 2 months previously, which was healthy and had normal fur. On examination, a 5x5 cm area in the parieto-occipital region showed thin and white scales, with tonsure...
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice - January 21, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Carvalho, V. O., Markus, J. R., Robl, R., Uber, M., Abagge, K. T., Marinoni, L. P. Tags: Immunology (including allergy), Drugs: infectious diseases, Child health, Dermatology Dermatophile Source Type: research

Answers to Dermatophile questions
Answers From the questions on page 11. Answer to Question 1 The answer is F, tinea capitis. Tinea capitis is a common fungal infection in childhood, which is caused by dermatophytes and manifests as scaly areas of alopecia on the scalp associated with tonsured hair (broken off a few millimetres above the scalp surface.).1 Transmission of the agent Microsporum canis can occur during contact with infected domestic animals (cats and dogs), which can be asymptomatic carriers without skin or hair lesions. Tinea capitis should be clinically suspected in the presence of tonsured hair and scales in an area of alopecia, especially ...
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice - January 21, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Carvalho, V. O., Markus, J. R., Robl, R., Uber, M., Abagge, K. T., Marinoni, L. P. Tags: Oncology, Journalology, Immunology (including allergy), Drugs: infectious diseases, Child and adolescent psychiatry (paedatrics), Child health, Anxiety disorders (including OCD and PTSD), Personality disorders, Dermatology, Competing interests (ethics), R Source Type: research

The Prevalence and Pattern of Superficial Fungal Infections among School Children in Ile-Ife, South-Western Nigeria.
Authors: Oke OO, Onayemi O, Olasode OA, Omisore AG, Oninla OA Abstract Fungal infections of the skin and nails are common global problems with attendant morbidity among affected individuals. Children are mostly affected due to predisposing factors such as overcrowding and low socioeconomic factors. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and the clinical patterns of superficial fungal infections among primary school children in Ile-Ife. A multistage sampling was conducted to select eight hundred pupils from ten primary schools in Ile-Ife. Data on epidemiological characteristics and clinical history wa...
Source: Dermatology Research and Practice - January 13, 2015 Category: Dermatology Tags: Dermatol Res Pract Source Type: research

Striking Striae from “Triple-Threat” Lotion
A teenage male presented with extensive “red scars” on his lower extremities. He reported having had scattered pink, scaly, round plaques on his medial thighs about one-half-year ago, which he believed to be ringworm infection. While on a family trip to Mexico, he purchased an over-the-counter lotion touted for its antifungal properties and applied it twice a day to affected areas for 5 consecutive months. (Source: The Journal of Pediatrics)
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - January 9, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Andrew C. Krakowski, Emily Osier Tags: Insights and Images Source Type: research

Generalized Favus: The Story of a Legendary Case of Tinea Favosa.
aza F Abstract From the moment the Olavide Museum opened its doors in 1882 until its content was packed up around 1965 and lost sight of for a time, it underwent a succession of changes. Some of those changes cannot be fully documented now because the archives of the Provincial Council (Diputación) of Madrid were lost during the Spanish Civil War. The museum was initially housed in Hospital de San Juan de Dios, in the neighborhood of Atocha. Because this hospital treated mainly venereal diseases, much of the information we have about it comes from newspapers or magazines of the period, and their accounts we...
Source: Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas - January 9, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Conde-Salazar Gómez L, Heras Mendaza F Tags: Actas Dermosifiliogr Source Type: research

Dermatophyte and non dermatophyte fungi in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia
Conclusions The results concluded that approximately M. cnais caused a quarter of dermatophyte cases, Tinea capitis infection was prevalence and the molecular method was more accurate than conventional methods. (Source: Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences)
Source: Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences - January 6, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: research

[Tinea capitis. Dermoscopic findings in 37 patients.]
CONCLUSIONS: Dermoscopy in tinea capitis showed the presence of "comma hairs", and "corkscrew hairs". Scales, peripilar casts and alopecia were also found. It would be desirable to establish this diagnostic tool, particularly when an optical microscope or a mycology reference laboratory are not available. PMID: 25728878 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Revista Iberoamericana de Micologia)
Source: Revista Iberoamericana de Micologia - January 6, 2015 Category: Biology Authors: Arrazola-Guerrero J, Isa-Isa R, Torres-Guerrero E, Arenas R Tags: Rev Iberoam Micol Source Type: research

Tinea capitis in schoolchildren in a rural area in southern Ethiopia
Abstract ObjectivesSkin diseases, especially tinea capitis, represent some of the most frequent causes of morbidity in developing countries. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalences of fungal infections in schoolchildren in a primary school located in a rural area in southern Ethiopia and to perform an analysis of the risk factors associated with tinea capitis. MethodsThis school‐based, prospective cross‐sectional study was conducted in October 2012 in Gambo School, Kore, West Arsi, Oromya Region, Ethiopia. Detailed interviews and dermatological examinations were performed. No laboratory examinations were c...
Source: International Journal of Dermatology - December 29, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: Maria Leiva‐Salinas, Irene Marin‐Cabanas, Isabel Betlloch, Abraham Tesfasmariam, Francisco Reyes, Isabel Belinchon, José Manuel Ramos Tags: Tropical Medicine Rounds Source Type: research

Bar code–like hair: Dermoscopic marker of tinea capitis and tinea of the eyebrow
A 79-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of progressive hair loss in the occipital and right eyebrow regions. Physical examination revealed numerous erythematous and alopecic plaques with pustules on her occiput (Fig 1, inset). There was also a small erythematous scaly patch on her right inner eyebrow with hair loss (Fig 2, inset). The remainder of the history and physical examination was unremarkable. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - December 12, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: Hsiao-Han Wang, Yu-Ting Lin Source Type: research

Tinea capitis and tinea faciei in the Zurich area – an 8‐year survey of trends in the epidemiology and treatment patterns
ConclusionsAnthropophilic isolates accounted for three quarters of tinea capitis and one quarter of tinea faciei cases. T. violaceum‐positive tinea capitis was primarily linked to patients of African ethnicity. Tinea capitis caused by Microsporum spp. was more refractory to therapy and needed longer treatment than Trichophyton spp.‐induced infection. (Source: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology)
Source: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology - December 10, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: S. Kieliger, M. Glatz, A. Cozzio, P.P. Bosshard Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Newly Described Features Resulting From High-Magnification Dermoscopy of Tinea Capitis
Conclusions and RelevanceThe identification of new findings using higher-magnification dermoscopy may enhance the diagnosis of tinea capitis and be of help to better understand some pathogenetic mechanisms. (Source: JAMA Dermatology)
Source: JAMA Dermatology - December 3, 2014 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Different trichoscopic features of tinea capitis and alopecia areata in pediatric patients.
Conclusion. Trichoscopy can be used as a noninvasive tool for rapid diagnosis of tinea capitis and alopecia areata in pediatric patients. PMID: 25024698 [PubMed] (Source: Dermatology Research and Practice)
Source: Dermatology Research and Practice - December 2, 2014 Category: Dermatology Tags: Dermatol Res Pract Source Type: research

A comparative study on morphological versus molecular identification of dermatophyte isolates
Conclusion An unexpected high percent of isolates identified as T. interdigitale by conventional methods, were in effect T. rubrum shown by PCR-RFLP, and regarding the necessity of correct identification of dermatophytes recovered from different clinical forms of the infection, we highly recommend ITS-sequencing or ITS-RFLP of the isolates, particularly for epidemiological research studies. (Source: Journal of Medical Mycology)
Source: Journal of Medical Mycology - November 19, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Fingertip contamination after a brief touch of tinea capitis lesions caused by Microsporum canis
(Source: British Journal of Dermatology)
Source: British Journal of Dermatology - November 19, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: M.H. Grunwald, B. Amichai, A. Shemer Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Diagnosis and Management of Tinea Infections.
Abstract Tinea infections are caused by dermatophytes and are classified by the involved site. The most common infections in prepubertal children are tinea corporis and tinea capitis, whereas adolescents and adults are more likely to develop tinea cruris, tinea pedis, and tinea unguium (onychomycosis). The clinical diagnosis can be unreliable because tinea infections have many mimics, which can manifest identical lesions. For example, tinea corporis can be confused with eczema, tinea capitis can be confused with alopecia areata, and onychomycosis can be confused with dystrophic toenails from repeated low-level tra...
Source: American Family Physician - November 15, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Ely JW, Rosenfeld S, Seabury Stone M Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research

Ethnomedicinal plants used to treat skin diseases by Tharu community of district Udham Singh Nagar, Uttarakhand, India
Conclusions The present study has revealed significant information on various medicinal plants used to treat skin diseases by Tharu community. Literature review has confirmed most of the claims made by the Tharu community regarding treatment of various skin diseases by the reported plants. The literature review has also revealed that products from very few of the reported plants are available in market, while most of the reported plants are still under preclinical or clinical trials. There are various known phytochemicals, and antibiotic, antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal agents present in these plants which may be s...
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - November 14, 2014 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

High dermatophyte contamination levels in hairdressing salons of a West African suburban community
Summary Tinea capitis is a dermatophyte infection of scalp is commonly spread by currently infected patients, asymptomatic carriers or by fomites, such as hairdressing tools. However, studies on the risk factors of Tinea capitis remain scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dermatophytes contamination level of the hairdressing tools to which hairdressing salon customers are exposed in Sirakoro‐Méguétana, a suburb of Bamako, the capital city of Mali. A total of 41 hairdressing tools were sampled in five hairdressing salons. Two anthropophilic dermatophytes species, Microsporum audouinii (53.3...
Source: Mycoses - November 1, 2014 Category: Research Authors: O. Coulibaly, M. A. Thera, R. Piarroux, O. K. Doumbo, S. Ranque Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

The dermoscopic comma, zigzag, and bar code-like hairs: Markers of fungal infection of the hair follicles
Publication date: September 2014 Source:Dermatologica Sinica, Volume 32, Issue 3 Author(s): Yu-Ting Lin , Yu-Chuan Li Comma hair has been described as a specific dermoscopic feature of tinea capitis, however, it is not always present. Recognition of the additional dermoscopic features is therefore important. Furthermore, comma hair has never been shown to be applicable in fungal infection of the hair follicles on other parts of the body such as the eyebrows, axillary, or pubic areas. We encountered 13 Taiwanese patients who had been diagnosed with tinea capitis and evaluated their dermoscopic features using a nonpolarize...
Source: Dermatologica Sinica - October 12, 2014 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Purification and characterization of antifungal phenazines from a fluorescent Pseudomonas strain FPO4 against medically important fungi
Publication date: September 2014 Source:Journal de Mycologie Médicale / Journal of Medical Mycology, Volume 24, Issue 3 Author(s): J.N. Gorantla , S. Nishanth Kumar , G.V. Nisha , A.S. Sumandu , C. Dileep , A. Sudaresan , M.M. Sree Kumar , R.S. Lankalapalli , B.S. Dileep Kumar The strain FPO4 was isolated from the rhizoplane of rice plant root and identified as a fluorescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the basis of 16S rDNA sequences and BLAST analysis. The extracellular metabolites produced by this strain were purified by silica gel column chromatography and isolated four pure compounds. Based on the spectral data ...
Source: Journal of Medical Mycology - October 12, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Thyroid and parathyroid tumours in patients submitted to X-ray scalp epilation during the tinea capitis eradication campaign in the North of Portugal (1950–1963)
Abstract Tinea capitis attained epidemical proportions in the fifth and sixth decades in Portugal, as in other countries. Before starting the utilization of griseofulvin in 1959, the best approach to treat tinea capitis infection was X-ray scalp epilation combined with topical antimycotic ointments. A long-term side effect of this therapy is thyroid disease, namely thyroid cancer; data on parathyroid lesions (hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma) are scarce. We observed clinically 1,375 individuals irradiated in childhood for tinea capitis treatment in the North of Portugal with the main purpose of evaluating thyro...
Source: Virchows Archiv - October 1, 2014 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

British Association of Dermatologists' guidelines for the management of tinea capitis 2014
(Source: British Journal of Dermatology)
Source: British Journal of Dermatology - September 19, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: L.C. Fuller, R.C. Barton, M.F. Mohd Mustapa, L.E. Proudfoot, S.P. Punjabi, E.M. Higgins Tags: Guidelines Source Type: research

Pattern of skin diseases among preschool and primary school-aged children in Dermatology Damietta Hospital
Source: Journal of the Egyptian Womens Dermatologic Society - September 1, 2014 Category: Dermatology Tags: Original articles Source Type: research

Management of a Trichophyton tonsurans Outbreak in a Day‐Care Center
We report on the management of an outbreak of T. tonsurans tinea capitis and tinea corporis among children and staff in a day‐care center. An outbreak control team with representatives from dermatology, microbiology, day‐care center management, and the Health Protection Agency initiated case ascertainment by scalp inspection and brushing of all children and staff at the nursery. Two complete rounds of screening were required before the outbreak was declared over. Infection control measures included antifungal shampoo use, exclusion of identified cases for a short period, removal of shared items from the center, an...
Source: Pediatric Dermatology - September 1, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: Robert M. Gray, Caroline Champagne, David Waghorn, Eugene Ong, Sophie A. Grabczynska, Jill Morris Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Mycology – an update Part 2: Dermatomycoses: Clinical picture and diagnostics
Summary Most fungal infections of the skin are caused by dermatophytes, both in Germany and globally. Tinea pedis is the most frequent fungal infection in Western industrial countries. Tinea pedis frequently leads to tinea unguium, while in the elderly, both may then spread causing tinea corporis. A variety of body sites may be affected, including tinea glutealis, tinea faciei and tinea capitis. The latter rarely occurs in adults, but is the most frequent fungal infection in childhood. Following antifungal treatment of tinea unguium and also tinea capitis a dermatophytid or hyperergic reaction to dermatophyte antigens may ...
Source: JDDG - August 29, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: Pietro Nenoff, Constanze Krüger, Jörg Schaller, Gabriele Ginter‐Hanselmayer, Rudolf Schulte‐Beerbühl, Hans‐Jürgen Tietz Tags: CME‐Article Source Type: research

Mykologie – ein Update Teil 2: Dermatomykosen: Klinisches Bild und Diagnostik
Zusammenfassung Pilzinfektionen der Haut werden in Deutschland und weltweit am häufigsten durch Dermatophyten verursacht. Die Tinea pedis ist die häufigste Pilzinfektion in den Industriestaaten der westlichen Welt. Ausgehend von dieser Dermatophytose entwickelt sich eine Tinea unguium. Insbesondere bei älteren Patienten kommt es infolge Autoinokulation von der Tinea pedis et unguium zu Tinea‐Formen der freien Haut. Die Tinea capitis tritt bei Erwachsenen selten auf. Dagegen gilt sie als häufigste Pilzinfektion im Kindesalter. Bei der antimykotischen Behandlung der Tinea unguium und der Tinea capitis k...
Source: JDDG - August 29, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: Pietro Nenoff, Constanze Krüger, Jörg Schaller, Gabriele Ginter‐Hanselmayer, Rudolf Schulte‐Beerbühl, Hans‐Jürgen Tietz Tags: CME‐Artikel Source Type: research

Topical antifungal treatments for tinea cruris and tinea corporis.
CONCLUSIONS: The pooled data suggest that the individual treatments terbinafine and naftifine are effective. Adverse effects were generally mild and reported infrequently. A substantial number of the studies were more than 20 years old and of unclear or high risk of bias; there is however, some evidence that other topical antifungal treatments also provide similar clinical and mycological cure rates, particularly azoles although most were evaluated in single studies.There is insufficient evidence to determine if Whitfield's ointment, a widely used agent is effective.Although combinations of topical steroids and antifungals...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - August 4, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: El-Gohary M, van Zuuren EJ, Fedorowicz Z, Burgess H, Doney L, Stuart B, Moore M, Little P Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Trichophyton species of Arthroderma benhamiae – a new infectious agent in dermatology
Summary In Germany, infections due to the zoophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton (T.) species of Arthroderma benhamiae are being more frequently diagnosed. The source of infection of this emerging pathogen overlaps with that of the zoophilic species T. interdigitale. The most common source are guinea pigs. T. species of Arthroderma benhamiae causes inflammatory dermatophytosis in children and adolescents. In addition to tinea capitis, it may cause both tinea corporis, tinea manus and frequently tinea faciei. In Germany, T. species of Arthroderma benhamiae is a frequent zoophilic dermatophyte, which in regions is probably more...
Source: JDDG - July 1, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: Pietro Nenoff, Silke Uhrlaß, Constanze Krüger, Marcel Erhard, Uta‐Christina Hipler, Florian Seyfarth, Jürgen Herrmann, Tino Wetzig, Wieland Schroedl, Yvonne Gräser Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Trichophyton Spezies von Arthroderma benhamiae – ein neuer Infektionserreger in der Dermatologie
Zusammenfassung In Deutschland kommen seit einigen Jahren Infektionen durch den zoophilen Dermatophyten Trichophyton (T.) Spezies von Arthroderma benhamiae vor. Das Reservoir für diesen neuen Erreger – ein emerging pathogen – überlappt mit dem des zoophilen T. interdigitale. Insbesondere Meerschweinchen sind Carrier. T. Spezies von Arthroderma benhamiae verursacht eine entzündliche Tinea bei Kindern und Jugendlichen. Neben der Tinea capitis werden Tinea corporis und Tinea manus verursacht, vor allem jedoch die Tinea faciei. T. Spezies von Arthroderma benhamiae ist in Deutschland ein häufiger...
Source: JDDG - July 1, 2014 Category: Dermatology Authors: Pietro Nenoff, Silke Uhrlaß, Constanze Krüger, Marcel Erhard, Uta‐Christina Hipler, Florian Seyfarth, Jürgen Herrmann, Tino Wetzig, Wieland Schroedl, Yvonne Gräser Tags: Review Source Type: research

Treatment of Ringworm in Shelter Cats with Terbinafine and Lime Sulfur Rinses
Itraconazole has been recommended for the treatment of dermatophytosis in shelter cats. Although very effective when used in conjunction with topical antifungal rinses, itraconazole is expensive and can be difficult for shelters to obtain. In the United States, fluconazole and terbinafine are available in generic formulations, with the latter being markedly less expensive. The antifungal efficacy of terbinafine has been documented against Microsporum canis dermatophytosis in laboratory and pet cats. Terbinafine residual activity in cat hair has been documented to be similar to that of itraconazole. There is a published rep...
Source: Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery - July 1, 2014 Category: Veterinary Research Tags: Dermatology Source Type: research

Treatment of Ringworm in Shelter Cats with Terbinafine and Lime Sulfur Rinses
(Source: Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery)
Source: Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery - July 1, 2014 Category: Veterinary Research Tags: Dermatology Source Type: research