Rhubarb pecan muffins
(Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - August 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How the nation's best-selling flavoured gins secretly contain up to 15 teaspoons of sugar
Pink gin is fast becoming the trendiest drink of the summer - but many Brits may be oblivious to the fact many of them are full of sugar. Whitley Neill's Handcrafted Rhubarb Gin contains 9.3g per 100ml. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why You Should Try Rhubarb
THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 -- Despite its vibrant green and red stalks, rhubarb might be one of the most overlooked plants in the garden. An acquired taste, it looks like celery and has a tart tang, yet is used in many dessert recipes, from compote to... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 13, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Europe's safety watchdog says laxatives may increase cancer risk
LONDON (Reuters) - European food safety officials issued a warning on Tuesday about potential health problems, including an increased risk of some cancers, linked to long-term use of laxatives such as senna and rhubarb extract. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Break The Dry Spell: 5 Moisturizing Skincare Products To Buy Now For Winter
For W magazine, by Jane Larkworthy. As soon as November hits, every part of me gets parched. Here is my arsenal of hydrating helpers. 1. Alcohol can be drying to skin; perfume contains alcohol. Solution? These three sublime oil-based scents—the white-floral Bikini Questa Sera, the rhubarb and violet Tornade Blonde, and the rose and amber Trouble in Heaven—from the shoe god himself. Christian Louboutin Perfume Oils, $320 each, christianlouboutin.com Related: Relax Like a Local: 11 Spa Treatments From Around the World 2. I soften my arms and knees with this hemp-seed and coconut-oil formula, which is infused with a he...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bladder Stone Basics
Bladder stones are not often heard of as they are not nearly as common as kidney stones. Sometimes referred to as urinary tract stones or bladder calculi, they primarily affect men as 95% of all bladder stones cases are found in men. What are bladder stones? Bladder stones are formed when substances such as calcium oxalate concentrate in the urine turning into hard, solid lumps lodging in the bladder. It is more common to have several stones form at the same time. Urine is about 95% water with the other 5% containing minerals such as salt, and waste products such as protein. When the urine is concentrated, often due to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What It Means When You See Blood In Your Urine
There are few moments more frightening than seeing blood in your urine. Happily, the cause is often not serious. The condition is more formally known as hematuria, and blood in the urine is usually the only symptom. Note that it does not take much blood to color urine pink or red, and the bleeding is usually not painful. Certain foods - notably rhubarb and beets - can also turn your urine a reddish color. In all instances of detecting blood in your urine, see a doctor. It is symptomatic of a number of ailments, including: • An enlarged prostate. As this gland begins to grow - commonly with the onset of middle age in m...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Do you know your rhubarb from your chicory? Britons are IGNORANT over fruit and veg
BRITONS spend a measly amount on vegetables every week, despite many considering themselves to be healthy. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines' 2015 Quiz of the Year
In 2015, Behind the Headlines covered more than 500 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. Why not test your knowledge of 2015's health news with our month-by-month quiz?If you've been paying attention, you should find this quiz both easy and fun.Answers are at the bottom of the page – no peeking! QuestionsIn January 2015's health news...1. What activity was said to increase the risk of heart disease?a) playing violent video games b) sexual role playing c) angry tweeting 2. Eating like a what was claimed to reduce obesity risk?a) a Native American b) a Zulu c) a Viking In February 2015's health ne...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications. Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene. Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we don't know...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines' Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications.Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found that elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene.Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we don't k...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

RHUBARB can save your life: Ingredient in plant kills half of cancer cells in 48 hours
RHUBARB contains an ingredient that speedily kills cancer, research has shown. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Claims rhubarb pigment 'could help cancer crumble'
Conclusion This study found that a chemical found in rhubarb called physcion, and related chemicals, are able to reduce cancer cell growth in the lab and in mice. They do this by blocking a protein called 6PGD. While the chemical is found in rhubarb – where it produces an orange pigment – it was concentrated for use in this study and a slightly modified form was used in the mice.  As yet, these chemicals have only been tested on human cancer cells in the laboratory and injected into mice. We therefore can't conclude eating rhubarb is going to "save your life", as implied by the Daily Express' front page. ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Cancer-killing drug made of rhubarb will be ready ‘within years’
RHUBARB contains an ingredient that speedily kills cancer, research has shown. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Orange-coloured compound in rhubarb helps kills tumours cells
Scientists from Emory University in Atlanta found that Parietin, which is also found in lichen, can zap cells in leukaemia, as well as lung and head and neck tumours. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news