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Relenza (Zanamivir) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - September 25, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Expert panel reviews neuraminidase inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza
(European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)) An ECDC expert opinion concludes that there is clear evidence supporting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Moreover, the current recommendations in European countries on the use of the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir are appropriate and should be applied by prescribing physicians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

zanamivir, Relenza
Title: zanamivir, RelenzaCategory: MedicationsCreated: 12/5/1999 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/16/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Medications General)
Source: MedicineNet Medications General - May 16, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Assessing Fever in Returning Travelers: Part II
  Zika continues to be the virus of the day for returning travelers, but there are several other diseases that we need to consider in these patients when they present to us in the emergency department. Chikungunya is epidemic in many of the same countries as Zika and can be even more devastating. And Avian and MERS-CoV is still present in many countries. Unlike patients infected with Zika virus, these patients do require isolation to protect our health care staff from infection. Chikungunya Chikungunya, which means “to walk bent over,” was likely endemic but unrecognized in the United States before the mos...
Source: EPMonthly.com - November 25, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matt McGahen Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

How Effective is Oseltamivir?
Discussion Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) is an oral neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza viruses types A and B. It first came on the market in Switzerland in 1999 and currently is used around the world along with other neuraminidase inhibitors to treat seasonal and pandemic influenza. Oseltamivir is easily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and circulates to the liver where it is converted to its active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC). In adults approximately 75% of the oral medication is converted and it then travels to the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Unchanged oseltamivir is eliminated in the urine. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 5, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Intravenous Zanamivir for Immunosuppressed Patients With Flu Intravenous Zanamivir for Immunosuppressed Patients With Flu
An intravenous formulation of a neuraminidase inhibitor is a good option for the treatment of influenza, especially for patients who cannot tolerate oral or inhaled treatments, new research shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Intravenous Zanamivir for Hospitalized Patients With Flu Intravenous Zanamivir for Hospitalized Patients With Flu
An intravenous formulation of a neuraminidase inhibitor is a good option for the treatment of influenza, especially for patients who cannot tolerate oral or inhaled treatments, new research shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - August 29, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Scientists Hope Tracking Winter Flu Will Help Close Pandemic Knowledge Gap
ImageContent(562e45c2e4b0aac0b8fd7c69,562e42a91900002e00b94dab,Image,HectorAssetUrl(562e42a91900002e00b94dab,Some(),Some(jpeg)),ViktorCap via Getty Images,) Anyone who goes down with flu in Europe this winter could be asked to enroll in a randomized clinical trial in which they will either be given a drug, which may or may not work, or standard advice to take bed rest and paracetamol. Those who agree could be helping the world prepare for the next potentially deadly disease pandemic as well as helping scientists who are now desperate to plug gaps in knowledge left by previous missed opportunities. Scientists are largely in...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why Transparency And Data Sharing In Clinical Trials Matters
We’re in the middle of a major flu epidemic, and the CDC has recommended treatment with an antiviral (e.g., Tamiflu or Relenza) for high-risk people. Yet there is considerable controversy over whether Tamiflu even works and, despite promises, Roche staunchly refused to release all their data for others to verify for years. The Cochrane Collaborativeā  was finally able to review data and, in 2014, reported that Tamiflu did not reduce the number of hospitalizations, and they could not tell whether it reduced deaths. While it did reduce symptoms marginally (by less than one day), a large number of people who take it de...
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 15, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Judy Stone Source Type: news

Flu season: The flu shot and what parents need to know now
The 2014-15 flu season is here, and it’s reached epidemic proportions. This season’s strain appears particularly nasty. About half of the United States is contending with high levels of flu activity, which means an onslaught of symptoms like fever, runny or stuff nose, cough and sore throat. Massachusetts has not been hit as hard as some other areas of the country. But the relative lull in flu activity might be the calm before the storm. The flu season will last for several more weeks, especially in areas that have not yet seen significant activity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (C...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 6, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Source Type: news

FDA Approves Peramivir (Rapivab) for InfluenzaFDA Approves Peramivir (Rapivab) for Influenza
A neuraminidase inhibitor, peramivir is administered intravenously, unlike oseltamivir or zanamivir, giving clinicians another treatment option. FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - December 22, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Alert Source Type: news

Did Tamiflu reviewers have a bad case of the financial conflict bug?
We report and comment on medical innovations and advances – from bench to bedside – touching on scientific, business and policy issues. Our ranks include science writers, physicians, lab researchers, market analysts and others inside and outside the hospital. By Tom Ulrich This winter, if your doctor suggests that you take Tamiflu, you might want to ask for a conflict of interest statement: a new study suggests that doctors who received payments from the makers of flu-fighting neuraminidase inhibitors – drugs like Tamiflu® and Relenza® – were more likely to view the drugs' prowes...
Source: Mass Device - October 17, 2014 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Vector Blog Source Type: news

Tamiflu & Relenza: How effective are they?
Experts call on government and health policy decision makers to review guidance on use of Tamiflu in light of the most recent evidence. Tamiflu (the antiviral drug oseltamivir) shortens symptoms of influenza by half a day, but there is no good evidence to support claims that it reduces admissions to hospital or complications of influenza. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Tamiflu and Relenza: How effective are they?
Experts call on government and health policy decision makers to review guidance on use of Tamiflu in light of the most recent evidence. Tamiflu (the antiviral drug oseltamivir) shortens symptoms of influenza by half a day, but there is no good evidence to support claims that it reduces admissions to hospital or complications of influenza. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study Says Gov't Wasted Billions on Flu Drugs that Won't Stop Pandemics
Cochrane Collaboration, an independent network of research scientists, has said that governments who stockpile Roche's flu medicine Tamiflu and GlaxoSmithKline's drug Relenza are wasting billions of dollars on a drugs with doubtful effectiveness. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - April 10, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Effectiveness of Tamiflu and Relenza questioned
ConclusionThis major review is particularly significant for its use of unpublished, previously confidential data from both the drug manufacturers and regulators, to verify the information in published trials. As the researchers point out, much of the trial data is unreliable for various reasons, which makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions.While it appears that these drugs have a modest benefit, there is no solid evidence that either drug can protect people from the more serious complications of influenza. Paracetamol or ibuprofen would seem to be a far more cost-effective method of relieving the symptoms of influenza...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Swine flu Source Type: news

Tamiflu, Relenza Data Show Little Clinical Benefit Against Flu (FREE)
By Joe Elia The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza) have only marginal benefits in the treatment and prevention of influenza, a series of BMJ articles concludes.Investigators reviewed documents submitted to regulatory agencies concerning both drugs.Tamiflu data showed … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - April 10, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

NEW: Investigational Use of Intravenous Zanamivir for 2013-2014 Influenza Season
(Source: CDC Flu updates)
Source: CDC Flu updates - January 30, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Well: Lifesaving Flu Drugs Fall in Use in Children
Prompt use of antiviral medications can save the lives of flu-stricken children — yet the drugs are being used less frequently than they once were, a study finds.     (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - November 25, 2013 Category: American Health Authors: By CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS Tags: Family Babies and Infants Influenza Preventive Medicine Body Relenza (Drug) Parenting Featured Children and Childhood Tamiflu (Drug) Source Type: news

NHS Choices 'Behind the Headlines' assessment of press reports that a "new antiviral may help in flu fight"
Source: NHS Choices Area: News The 'Behind the Headlines' service from NHS Choices has featured a quality assessment of press reports that a 'flu drug shows promise in overcoming resistance' (BBC news and other; 22nd Feb 2013).   The reports are based on early stage laboratory and animal research, which examined the effectiveness of a possible new antiviral treatment for flu. It was found in the laboratory to be similarly or more effective than zanamivir at stopping the influenza virus from spreading between cells, including strains with demonstrated resistance to oseltamivir and zanamivir. The chemical was also ...
Source: NeLM - News - February 25, 2013 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

New antiviral may help in flu fight
Conclusion There are currently only two flu drugs authorised for use in the UK. As they become more widely used, flu viruses will inevitably develop resistance to them. This is particularly likely to be a problem for the more widely used Tamiflu. Research exploring new flu drugs that act in different ways could be very useful as flu can be a deadly disease, particularly in vulnerable population groups. This new research demonstrates that a new chemical has the potential to be developed into a flu drug as it was found to be similarly or more effective than Relenza at stopping the spread of the flu virus in the laboratory, i...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Source Type: news