Baloxavir (Xofluza): A new antiviral drug for the flu
A new drug for the treatment of influenza was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in October 2018, just in time for the 2018–19 flu season. Baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza) works against the two types of influenza virus that cause disease in humans, influenza A and B. This new drug works differently than currently available drugs, including oseltamivir (Tamiflu), zanamivir (Relenza), and peramivir (Rapivab). These older drugs inhibit the virus by blocking a viral enzyme called neuraminidase. In contrast, baloxavir inhibits a subunit of the viral polymerase, the enzyme responsible for influenza virus rep...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Daniel Kuritzkes, MD Tags: Cold and Flu Health Source Type: blogs

The flu is here — and so is a new advisory from the CDC
In conclusion… Maybe this year’s flu season will be milder than expected. But I wouldn’t count on it. I’ve had the flu and it’s not pleasant. Do what you can to lessen your risk. It’s worth the effort. The post The flu is here — and so is a new advisory from the CDC appeared first on Harvard Health Blog. (Source: Harvard Health Blog)
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cold and Flu Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

Kermit ’ s urumi
Frogs don’t get flu (as far as I know) but their skin contains a peptide that inhibits the replication of influenza virus (link to paper). Frog skin contains host defense peptides (HDPs), part of the innate immune defenses of many species. They were first found in amphibians by Michael Zasloff, who, as part of his research, performed surgery on frogs and then returned them to an aquarium – which was not sterile. He wondered why the frogs always healed without signs of infection, which lead him to discover the antimicrobial peptides, called magainins, in frog skin. HDPs had been first discovered years earli...
Source: virology blog - July 27, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information amphibian antiviral compound defensin HDP host defense peptide influenza virus magainin urumin viruses Source Type: blogs

6 tricks that pharmaceutical marketers use
Long before the Internet and direct-to-consumer advertising, the medical profession tried to reassure people about their health concerns. Remember “take two aspirins and call me in the morning?” Flash forward to today’s online “symptom checkers.” They are quizzes to see if someone has a certain disease and exhortations to see their doctor even if they feel fine. Once drug makers discovered that health fears and even hypochondria sell drugs, there seems to be no end to the new diseases, symptoms and risks people need to worry about. In fact, since drug ads began on TV, Americans take so many dr...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/martha-rosenberg" rel="tag" > Martha Rosenberg < /a > Tags: Meds Medications Source Type: blogs

TWiV 296: Influenza viruses with Peter Palese
Vincent speaks with Peter Palese about his illustrious career in virology, from early work on neuraminidases to universal influenza virus vaccines, on episode #396 of the science show This Week in Virology. You can find TWiV #396 at microbe.tv/twiv, or listen below. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 396 (54 MB .mp3, 74 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, RSS, email (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 3, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology aerosol transmission ferret Flu gain of function H5N1 influenza influenza virus neuraminidase relenza swine flu tamiflu universal vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

TWiV 396: Influenza viruses with Peter Palese
Vincent speaks with Peter Palese about his illustrious career in virology, from early work on neuraminidases to universal influenza virus vaccines, on episode #396 of the science show This Week in Virology. You can find TWiV #396 at microbe.tv/twiv, or listen below. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 396 (54 MB .mp3, 74 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, RSS, email (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 3, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology aerosol transmission ferret Flu gain of function H5N1 influenza influenza virus neuraminidase relenza swine flu tamiflu universal vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Tamiflu For All? Evidence Of Morbidity In CDC’s Antiviral Guidelines
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has boiled down its public health campaign against influenza to a single slogan: “Take 3.” Vaccines, everyday preventive actions like handwashing, and influenza antivirals. Last year, because of a mismatch between the vaccine and circulating virus, the message was reduced to—essentially—“Take 1,” as the CDC emphatically promoted oseltamivir (Tamiflu) for treating disease. The agency has stated: “Antiviral flu medicines are underutilized. If you get them early, they could keep you out of the hospital and might even save your ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 31, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Peter Doshi, Kenneth Mandl and Florence Bourgeois Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Global Health Health Professionals Public Health Quality CDC clinical trials drug safety FDA influenza Physicians Prevention Research vaccines Source Type: blogs

Public trust, the CDC and Tamiflu
Why do doctors lose credibility? Consider the few public doctors out there with millions of followers. The majority of the stuff they recommend is perfect: eat good food, exercise, be nice. and sleep. Check. No problem. Everyone is good with that until they shatter the sense with nonsense. One miracle cure or stupid supplement or financial conflict ruins everything. That goes, too, for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). These guys must have the highest of the moral ground. For if we are to believe them about public health matters, there can be no conflicts of interest. The public good, pure evidence, that is all. I rec...
Source: Dr John M - February 13, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Yet another avian influenza virus, H10N8, infects humans
To the collection of avian influenza viruses known to sporadically infect humans – H5N1, H7N9, H7N2, H7N3, H7N7, H9N2, and H10N7 – we can now add H10N8, recently found in two individuals in China. Avian influenza virus H10N8 was first detected in tracheal aspirates from a 73 year old woman who was hospitalized in November 2013 for severe respiratory illness. The patient, who died, had previously visited a live poultry market. A second infection with this virus was detected in January 2014. Virus isolated from tracheal aspirates on day 7 of illness was named A/Jiangxi-Donghu/346/2013(H10N8). Nucleotide sequence ...
Source: virology blog - February 10, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information avian influenza China H10N8 H5N1 h7n9 HA viral virus zoonosis zoonotic Source Type: blogs

BMJ - Hidden Data Putting GlaxoSmithKline to the test over paroxetine
Cite this as: BMJ 2013;347:f6754Child and adolescent psychiatryChild and adolescent psychiatry (paedatrics)More topics ArticleRelated contentRead responses (1)Article metricsPeter Doshi, associate editorAuthor Affiliationspdoshi@bmj.comBlockbuster antidepressant paroxetine is no stranger to headlines. The drug is now back centre stage as requests for clinical data from one of its trials are testing manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline’s commitment to full transparency, Peter Doshi reportsWhen the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry(JAACAP) published study 329 in 20...
Source: PharmaGossip - November 15, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

The neuraminidase of influenza virus
This article is part of Influenza 101, a series of posts about influenza virus biology and pathogenesis. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 5, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information glycoprotein influenza neuraminidase relenza sialic acid spread tamiflu viral virus Source Type: blogs

First human infections with avian influenza H7N9 virus
Fourteen people in China have been infected with avian influenza H7N9 virus, leading to five deaths. This avian influenza virus has never been isolated from humans. Influenza A viruses with the H7 hemagglutinin protein circulate among birds, and some, such as H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7, have been previously found to infect humans. It is not known how the individuals in China acquired the H7N9 virus. Some of the infections have occurred in Shanghai, where a similar virus was found in pigeon samples collected at a marketplace in that city. It is not clear what types of pigeon samples tested positive for the virus, nor is it k...
Source: virology blog - April 5, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information avian influenza China h7n9 H9N2 HA hemagglutinin pandemic reassortant Shanghai viral virus Source Type: blogs

Roche offers researchers access to all Tamiflu trials
BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f2157 (Published 4 April 2013) Cite this as: BMJ 2013;346:f2157 Article Related content Article metrics Deborah Cohen Author Affiliations More than three years after the Cochrane Collaboration first asked Roche for the full clinical study reports for its influenza drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu), the Swiss company has offered the collaboration access to “all 74 Roche sponsored trials.” Don MacLean, life cycle leader for Tamiflu at Roche, emailed the Cochrane researchers on 2 April to propose pro...
Source: PharmaGossip - April 4, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

TWiV 223: EEEV and the serpent
On episode #223 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent, Alan, and Kathy discuss new influenza virus NA inhibitors, detection of EEEV antibody and RNA in snakes, and replication of the coronavirus EMC in human airway epithelial cells. You can find TWiV #223 at www.twiv.tv. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - March 10, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology alphavirus coronavirus EMC eastern equine encephalitis virus EEEV human airway epithelial cells influenza neuraminidase relenza snakes tamiflu togavirus viral zoonotic Source Type: blogs

Which bit of All and Trials don't Roche understand?
Drug firm Roche pledges greater access to trials data 26 February 2013 Last updated at 18:00 Research suggests half of all clinical trials have never been published The pharmaceutical company Roche has announced that it will make more of the data from its clinical trials available to researchers. The company says it will appoint a panel of experts to evaluate and approve requests to access anonymised patient data. We understand and support calls for our industry to be more transparent” Daniel O'Day Roche But the announcement has been dismissed as "pathetic" by campaigners arguing for greater transparen...
Source: PharmaGossip - February 27, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Five Ways to Fight the Swine Flu
View the Swine Flu video here.   Winter in North America brings with it yearly uninvited guests- flu bugs- multiple strains of illness causing viruses just waiting for new bodies to infect.   The most common recommendation has been to protect yourself with a flu vaccine.  But with virtually all the US flu suddenly resistant to the leading antiviral Tamiflu, health officials are worried about where this could lead.  Here are some key guidelines you MUST know if you want to survive this year’s flu season.   How can you distinguish a cold from the flu? First understand that colds are minor ...
Source: Dr. Donna, MedicineWoman - January 25, 2009 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Dr. Donna Tags: breaking news Personal Health public health flu influenza pandemic prevention swine flu tamiflu treatment Source Type: blogs