The Cure For This Flesh-Eating Disease Makes Grown Men Run And Hide
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. UTUT FOREST, Kenya ― Amos Kiptui is no stranger to hardship. He was born in a cave 27 years ago and still lives in one, despite run-ins with wild buffalo, deadly snakes, leopards and lions.  So when thick, itchy welts began to appear on Kiptui’s right cheek, he took a sharp rock and scraped off layers of his skin, then packed the bleeding wound with traditional medicine made from bitter leaves.  “You put the leaves on a piece of iron and make a fire,&r...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'A Normal Man Would Not Want Me': A Heartbreaking Look At Leprosy In 2017
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. YANGON, Myanmar ― Su Myant Sandar was 17 when she first noticed a red patch on her cheek. At the time, she was working with her girlfriends at a garment factory on the poor outskirts of this city. She covered the spot with a thick layer of thanaka, a traditional plant-based makeup, and continued going to work as normal. But it was not an ordinary spot. It was the first visible sign of leprosy, a largely forgotten bacterial infection that affects tens of thousands of people every...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kenya: Key Myths That Allow Rabies to Thrive
[Nation] The death of a little girl last year left an indelible mark on us, as practising veterinary surgeons. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 19, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

This Woman Survived One Of The Deadliest Snake Attacks
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. CHERANGAN, KENYA ― Walking home from a party in the evening light, Cheposait Adomo was unaware of the 6.5-foot black mamba snake in her path until it had coiled around her ankles and sunk in its teeth. As Adomo screamed and pulled at the slithering knot that punctured her three times, she was unaware of the two other brown-colored mambas slithering over to provide backup. “I felt the bites and then a burning sensation,” Adomo, a mother of five, said of the attack, wh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC Investigates Dead Bat Found in Recalled Salad
Though it is extremely uncommon, investigators want to rule out the possibility of rabies (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Wait, That's Not a Crouton! (FREE)
By the Editors A couple has been advised to receive rabies postexposure prophylaxis after finding bat remains in their packaged … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - April 10, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Bat reportedly found in packaged Fresh Express salad mix
Two people were recommended for post-exposure rabies treatment after a consumer in Florida reported finding a dead bat in a packaged salad mix, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Saturday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

KU Leuven-led consortium to develop new vaccine against rabies and yellow fever
The KU Leuven-led RABYD-VAX consortium is all set to develop a new vaccine against rabies and yellow fever. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - April 4, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

KU Leuven to lead development of dual vaccine against yellow fever and rabies
(KU Leuven) Rabies and yellow fever claim ten thousands of lives each year. Vaccines already exist but various drawbacks that hinder their efficient distribution. One of them is the need to transport and store these vaccines at cool temperatures. The RABYD-VAX consortium, led by KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium), has now started developing a cheap, temperature-stable, and easy-to-produce vaccine against both diseases at once. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Rabies: What's an Exposure? Know When to Vaccinate Rabies: What's an Exposure? Know When to Vaccinate
To respond promptly, clinicians need to understand what constitutes a rabies exposure and how to properly dose the vaccine.CDC Expert Commentary (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - April 3, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases Commentary Source Type: news

When Bullets Fly, These Medics Grab Their Packs And Treat Patients On The Run
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. Everyone takes work home with them sometimes. But in civil war-torn South Sudan, some health workers take theirs on the run. In areas where armed groups have stormed into hospitals and shot people dead in their beds, or gutted and burned clinics, staff for the medical charity Doctors Without Borders (MSF) at times has had to run with patients and hide in the bush to continue treatment. Last year, a group of MSF health workers in the particularly hard-hit town of Leer, in Unity ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rabies Kills 189 People Every Day. Here's Why You Never Hear About It.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. Rabies is one of the most lethal viruses known to man. It kills virtually 100 percent of victims who don’t get the vaccine. Today, there is both the knowledge and the practical means to eradicate the disease, but it still causes 69,000 deaths worldwide every year. That’s 189 people a day. Rabies is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected animal, usually a dog. After infection, it typically takes between one and three months for a person to show...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ten million lives saved by 1962 breakthrough, study says
Nearly 200 million cases of polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, adenovirus, rabies and hepatitis A -- and approximately 450,000 deaths from these diseases -- were prevented in the US alone between 1963 and 2015 by vaccination, researchers estimate. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ten million lives saved by 1962 breakthrough, study says
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Nearly 200 million cases of polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, adenovirus, rabies and hepatitis A -- and approximately 450,000 deaths from these diseases -- were prevented in the US alone between 1963 and 2015 by vaccination, researchers estimate. The study is published in AIMS Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How we discovered the vampire bats that have learned to drink human blood
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Announcement: Release of National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians ’ 2016 Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 9, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control, 2016
The recommendations in this compendium serve as a basis for animal rabies prevention and control programs throughout the United States and facilitate standardization of procedures among jurisdictions, thereby contributing to an effective national rabies control program. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[Book Review] Our best shot
Meredith Wadman's meticulously researched and carefully crafted book, The Vaccine Race, is an enlightening telling of the development of vaccines in the mid-20th century. Drawing from firsthand interviews, personal correspondence, journal articles, and governmental archival documents, Wadman relates the work of the brilliant scientists who toiled for years to develop vaccines against diseases including polio, rubella, and rabies; the experiences of vulnerable individuals who were unwittingly enrolled in vaccine trials; and the suffering of families and individuals devastated by diseases that have since been nearl...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Erica C. Jonlin Tags: History of Science Source Type: news

Researchers highlight alarming link between feral pigs and vampire bats
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, a study shows that the number of vampire bats, which transmit rabies and are a concern for livestock breeders, may be increasing in Brazil and the Americas along with growth in the populations of invasive feral pigs and wild boars (Sus scrofa). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Human Rabies -- Puerto Rico, 2015 Human Rabies -- Puerto Rico, 2015
This fatal case of human rabies contracted from a mongoose bite highlights the importance of public and health care provider awareness of this deadly disease--especially from uncommon vectors.Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Michigan woman's finger left hanging by thread by her dog
WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT: Alexandra Ross, 22, from Michigan, was forced to have 17 injections to eliminate her risk of contracting rabies after she was bitten by her pet Aries. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains
Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bonn have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the... (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - January 20, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

[Feature] Taming rabies
An estimated 59,000 people die from rabies around the world every year. Their horrible suffering—including convulsions, terror, and aggression—and the fact that many victims are children led the World Health Organization and others to announce a goal to eliminate rabies deaths worldwide by 2030. The plan calls for cheaper and faster treatment for people. But its long-term bet is on vaccinating domestic dogs, which cause more than 99% of infections. The challenges are enormous in sub-Saharan Africa, where poor countries can hardly pay for millions of dogs to be vaccinated, and their governments often have troubl...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Erik Stokstad Source Type: news

Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains
Scientists have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. A clearing procedure which turns the brain into a'glass-like state'and light sheet fluorescence microscopy are used to visualize host-graft connections in a whole-brain preparation. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains
(University of Bonn) Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bonn have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. A clearing procedure which turns the brain into a 'glass-like state' and light sheet fluorescence microscopy are used to visualize host-graft connections in a whole-brain preparation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 19, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Imovax (Rabies Vaccine) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - January 18, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

European Union Summary Report on Trends and Sources of Zoonoses, Zoonotic Agents and Food-Borne Outbreaks in 2015
European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 12/16/2016 This 231-page document presents the results of the zoonoses monitoring activities carried out in 2015 in 32 European countries (28 Member States [MS] and four non-MS). A total of 4,362 food-borne outbreaks, including water-borne outbreaks, were reported. Bacteria were the most commonly detected causative agents, followed by bacterial toxins, viruses, other causative agents, and parasites. The report summarizes trends and sources for tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis, Brucella, Trichinella, Echinococcus, Toxoplasma, rabies, Coxiella burneti...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Study finds vaccination is the most cost-effective way to reduce rabies deaths in India
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Every year in India, about 20,000 people die from rabies. Most of the victims are children. Nearly all of the deaths occur after victims are bitten by rabid dogs. For years, experts have debated the best strategy to reduce this burden. Now, a new study has identified a cost-effective way to reduce death due to rabies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

8 Dog Park Safety Tips
1. Pick the right dog park for you and your pet. Ideally, an off-leash park should have: o A double-gate entry, secure fencing, and posted rules of conduct o Centrally located, well-stocked poop-bag dispensers and trash cans o Separate areas for large and small dogs, and plenty of room for dogs to run o A sheltered area, preferably with seating o Dog-friendly water fountains Before you bring your dog into the fenced area, take a few minutes to scan the activity in the park. If there are too many dogs, inattentive owners, aggressive animals, or piles of dog waste lying around, I recommend finding another park, or returnin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Reasons Raccoons Make Terrible Pets
Because they are so cute and precocious, many people wonder if raccoons make good pets. My answer is always, in a word, "No." Raccoons are wild animals, and many people don't realize it's unethical and illegal to capture a healthy wild animal and force it live out the rest of its life in confinement. Licensed wildlife rehabilitators like me are trained to care for sick or injured raccoons until they can be returned to the wild. We are also trained to prevent young animals from becoming imprinted, or socialized to humans and domestic animals. However, some rehabbed animals have permanent injuries that prevent t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Human Rabies — Puerto Rico, 2015
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - January 5, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Two major groups of rabies virus display distinct evolutionary trends
Using hundreds of viral genome sequences, scientists have shown that two major groups of rabies virus have unique evolutionary tendencies. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers combine MERS and rabies viruses to create innovative 2-for-1 vaccine
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) In a new study, researchers have modified a rabies virus, so that it has a protein from the MERS virus; this altered virus works as a 2-for-1 vaccine that protects mice against both Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and rabies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 7, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines 2016 Quiz of the Year
In 2014, Behind the Headlines has covered more than 500 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. If you've been paying attention you should find this quiz easy and fun. Why not test your knowledge of 2014's health news with our month-by-month quiz? Answers are at the foot of the page (no peeking!).   In January 2016's health news... In a controversial study, monkeys were genetically engineered to develop what disorder? 1) Sex addiction 2) Bi-polar disorder 3) Autism In a similarly controversial study, what psychological condition was dismissed as a "myth" 1) Seasonal af...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports Source Type: news

[Perspective] As the bat flies
The importance of predicting the timing and location of infectious disease emergence events from animal into human populations is highlighted by the effect of Ebola virus in West Africa. Such predictions are, however, usually hampered by a dearth of data. In a recent analysis of rabies viruses derived from vampire bats (see the photo) in Peru, Streicker et al. show that with sufficient data on both pathogen and host and with accurate models, predictions can be made to inform surveillance and public health efforts (1). Author: David T. S. Hayman (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 1, 2016 Category: Science Authors: David T. S. Hayman Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: news

Vietnam bans 39 Indian drug firms
Antibiotics made by Aurobindo and Mcleod, and Cadila's anti-rabies vaccine Lyssavac are some of the drugs that have been banned. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - November 23, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A three-year (2011-2013) surveillance on animal bites and victims vaccination in the South of Khorasan-e-Razavi Province, Iran - Riabi HR, Ghorbannia R, Mazlum SB, Atarodi A.
INTRODUCTION: Rabies is acute encephalitis caused by rabies virus and is transmissible between humans and warm blooded animals. The virus is belong to the family of Rabdoviridae and, of Lissavirus genus. AIM: To find out the success of rabies surve... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

A prospective study on the incidence of dog bites and management in a rural Cambodian, rabies-endemic setting - Ponsich A, Goutard F, Sorn S, Tarantola A.
Rabies circulates intensely in Cambodia, mainly affecting rural populations. We conducted a prospective study to estimate the baseline incidence of potentially infective dog bites in rural villages of Siem Reap province, Cambodia. The study was conducted i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Knowledge, attitudes and practices of animal bite victims attending an anti-rabies health center in Jimma Town, Ethiopia - Kabeta T, Deresa B, Tigre W, Ward MP, Mor SM.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is an important but preventable cause of death in Ethiopia. We assessed the knowledge, attitudes and practices of animal bite victims attending an anti-rabies health center in Jimma Town, Ethiopia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Owned and unowned dog population estimation, dog management and dog bites to inform rabies prevention and response on Lombok Island, Indonesia - Mustiana A, Toribio JA, Abdurrahman M, Suadnya IW, Hernandez-Jover M, Putra AA, Ward MP.
Although Indonesia has been rabies-infected since at least the 1880s, some islands remain rabies-free, such as Lombok. However, due to its adjacency to rabies-infected islands such as Bali and Flores, there is considerable risk of a rabies incursion. As pa... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Prevalence of dog bites in rural and urban slums of Delhi: a community-based study - Sharma S, Agarwal A, Khan AM, Ingle GK.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is a fatal disease of the central nervous system caused by the bites of warm-blooded animals. One of the important methods of controlling rabies is by interventions to limit the number of dog bites, the most common source of transmission... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Rabies awareness and dog ownership among rural northern and southern Chadian communities: analysis of a community-based, cross-sectional household survey - Mbilo C, L échenne M, Hattendorf J, Madjadinan S, Anyiam F, Zinsstag J.
Canine rabies represents a major - but preventable - public health threat in Chad. In preparation for a nation-wide canine parenteral mass vaccination campaign we conducted a community-based, cross-sectional multi-stage cluster survey in 40 villages in two... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

The Pan-African Rabies Control Network (PARACON): a unified approach to eliminating canine rabies in Africa - Scott TP, Coetzer A, de Balogh K, Wright N, Nel LH.
Even though Africa has the highest per capita death rate from rabies of any continent, and the disease is almost entirely transmitted by the bites of rabid dogs, there has been no coordinated pan-African approach to controlling canine rabies. In order to a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Dog demography, animal bite management and rabies knowledge-attitude and practices in the Awash Basin, eastern Ethiopia - Tschopp R, Bekele S, Aseffa A.
This study assessed dog demography, bite wound prevalence and management, potential risk factors of dise... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Epidemiological study of animal bites and rabies in Lorestan Province in west of Iran during 2004-2014 for preventive purposes - Sharafi AC, Tarrahi MJ, Saki M, Sharafi MM, Nasiri E, Mokhayeri H.
BACKGROUND: Despite the progress made, animal bites and rabies are one of the important health problems in the country. The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of animal bites and rabies during 2004-2014 in Lorestan Province to preven... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Epidemiology of animal bites and other potential rabies exposures and anti-rabies vaccine utilization in a rural area in Southern Ethiopia - Ramos JM, Melendez N, Reyes F, Gudiso G, Biru D, Fano G, Aberra G, Tessema D, Tesfamariam A, Balcha S, Guti érrez F.
The presented report describes the epidemiology of potential rabies exposures and examines the utilization of anti-rabies vaccine in a rural area of Ethiopia during a period of 43 months. A total of 683 persons (51.1% females, 73% children) with animal- re... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news