Helping shape the future of lifelong learning via SEK Education Group
This week, as many students around the globe finally go back to school to meet their peers and teachers in person for the first time since March, it is an honor to announce that our very own Álvaro Fernández Ibáñez has joined the International Advisory Board of SEK Education Group, which runs 9 bilingual IB schools, and a major university, in Spain, France, Ireland and Qatar. He (and us) look forward to seeing over 9,000 students from 70 different nationalities plus their many teachers and administrators, further develop their unique brains and minds in years ahead! About SEK Education Group: Wi...
Source: SharpBrains - September 9, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning bilingual brains Lifelong-learning minds schooling schools SEK Education Group students teachers Source Type: blogs

What Parents Should Know About Digital Health
A recent report titled “Digital Health Generation” found that more than 70% of young people are using apps, YouTube videos and other digital technologies such as Fitbits to track and manage their health. This includes children as young as eight years old. While it’s encouraging to see the younger generation adopt digital health solutions at such a young age, there are certain aspects of this adoption that they and their parents must take into consideration. “Over recent years there has been a surge of new online apps, blogs and videos specifically targeting young people with messages about person...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 27, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Policy Security & Privacy digital health kids fitness trackers data privacy Source Type: blogs

New Maritime Report Marked by Factual Errors and Dubious Claims
Colin GrabowThe Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments recently released a report on the U.S. maritime sector that hasgarneredconsiderablepraise from the Jones Act lobby. That ’s no surprise. EntitledStrengthening the U.S. Defense Maritime Industrial Base, the report explicitly calls for the Jones Act ’s retention. Overlooked amidst the plaudits, however, are factual errors and dubious assertions that call its endorsement of the law into question. This blog post will lay some of these out.Factual errorsThe report includes a number of factual errors. In this section, I note these inco...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 28, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Colin Grabow Source Type: blogs

Do Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders Really Care About Wealth Inequality?
Ryan BourneSenator Bernie Sanders has called levels of U.S. wealth inequality“outrageous,” “grotesque” and “immoral.” Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren is pushing for a wealth tax to curb what she describes as “runaway wealth concentration.” Yet despite their rhetoric, it’s not clear, deep down, whether either really cares about wealth inequality per se or believes that reducing it should be an overriding public policy goal.To see why, consider this. Every year,Credit Suisse calculates a wealth “Gini coefficient” for major countries, in...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 5, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Job: Assistant Professor in Fungal Biology – Cornell University
Assistant Professor; Fungal Biology; tenure track, academic year appointment (9-month) https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/15107 The search is looking for someone with research interests and expertise in the biology of plant-associated fungi and are particularly interested in learning of talented postdoctoral scholars or junior faculty who are or identify with underrepresented groups in science, representing diversity in its broadest sense. The School of Integrative Plant Science at Cornell University (https://sips.cals.cornell.edu) invites applications for a tenure track position at the Assistant Profe...
Source: Fungal Genomes and Comparative Genomics - October 21, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Jason Stajich Tags: fungi Source Type: blogs

What Happens When Genomics Meets Politics?
The number of people having their genomes sequenced could reach more than 100 million by 2025, researchers estimated. Policy-makers around the world started to realize the incredible potential in genomics for population health in the last 3-5 years, but there are huge question marks whether they can manage the use of this incredibly useful pool of data in an appropriate framework, with well-thought-out means, for the right purposes, meaning for the well-being of humans and communities in the present and the future. Here, we launched an article series to look at the countries with the most experience. Let’s start with...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 28, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Healthcare Policy data data privacy data security Estonia ethics Gene genetic genetics Genome genome sequencing health data personal genomics Personalized medicine population population genomic Source Type: blogs

Interventionists Evade Responsibility for Their Policy Disasters
Ted Galen CarpenterAs I point out in a newNational Interest Onlinearticle, a multi-sided struggle for power in Libya continues to fester more than eight years after the United States led an air war to help rebels oust longtime dictator Muammar Qaddafi.Libya joins Iraq and Syria as a classic example of the failed U.S. regime-change strategy.Fighting between Field Marshal Khalifa Haftar ’s so-called Libyan National Army (LNA) and the even more misnamed Government of National Accord (GNA) has intensified in and around the capital, Tripoli. The LNA boasted on September 11 that its forces had routed troops of the Sarraj m...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 20, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ted Galen Carpenter Source Type: blogs

What Does the Helium Shortage Mean for MRI?
Not only is Party City shutting down 45 stores in part because of the worldwide helium deficit, but medical imaging centers are also vulnerable to the short supply.The chemical element is a byproduct of natural gas production and the second-most common element in the universe. At one point the United States was the world ’s top helium producer, but got wrapped up in financial troubles and resorted to selling off its reserves in the late 1990s. Yet as of recently, Qatar, the world’s main producer of helium and claims 75 percentof global supply, was forced to stop exporting the gas after a handful of Middle ...
Source: radRounds - May 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Update: How to Challenge Health Care Corruption Under a Corrupt Regime
Summary: the Corruption of Health Care Leadership as a Major Cause of Health Care DysfunctionAs we wrote in August, 2017, Transparency International (TI) defines corruption asAbuse of entrusted power for private gainIn 2006,TI published a report on health care corruption, which asserted that corruption is widespread throughout the world, serious, and causes severe harm to patients and society.the scale of corruption is vast in both rich and poor countries.Also,Corruption might mean the difference between life and death for those in need of urgent care. It is invariably the poor in society who are affected most by corruptio...
Source: Health Care Renewal - October 17, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: anechoic effect conflicts of interest Donald Trump health care corruption regulatory capture Source Type: blogs

Profiles of Every Terrorism Vetting Failure in the Last 30 Years
In my newpolicy analysis released today, I identify 65 vetting failures where the visa vetting system allowed a foreign-born person to enter the United States as an adult or older teenager when they had already radicalized —80 percent occurred before 9/11. Just 13 vetting failures have occurred since 9/11, and only one—the last one (Tashfeen Malik)—resulted in any deaths in the United States. That’s one vetting failure for every 29 million visa or status approvals, and one deadly failure for every 379 million visa or status approvals from 2002 to 2016.As I note, 9/11 is reasonable point of analysis ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 17, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

The Two Faces of Mohammed bin Salman
Saudi Arabia ’s prodigal son returns to Washington this week, beginning a tour through the United States apparently aimed at drumming up investment in the country. Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) is young with big ideas: he wants to reform Saudi society and wean the Saudi economy off oil. He also wants to build up S audi as a foreign policy player – with or without the United States – and cement Saudi dominance in the Gulf.It ’s small wonder then that profiles and articles about the prince typically either laud him as a great reformer or simply criticize his foreign policy blunders. The truth is an accura...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 19, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Emma Ashford Source Type: blogs

What are the Kabul Attacks Signaling?
In January, Kabul endured three deadly attacks. On January 20, the Talibanstormed Kabul ’s InterContinental Hotel, killing 30 people (mainly foreigners) in a siege that lasted 14 hours. A week later,Taliban militantsdrove an ambulance into adesignated safe zone,killing at least95 people and injuring 158, whileISISclaimed responsibility for attacking theMarshal Fahim Military Academy west of Kabul that killed11 Afghan soldiers. President Trump responded by contending that there couldbe no negotiations with the Taliban. And though hisState of the Union addressonly briefly discussed foreign policy, the president vowed n...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Sahar Khan Source Type: blogs

Physicians share same mission across cultures and countries
A guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. As part of my role in International Programs at the American College of Physicians (ACP), I have a unique opportunity to travel frequently and engage with internists around the world. In fact, I am writing this while almost 7,000 miles away from home, participating in the 4th Annual Qatar Internal Medicine Conference/Best of ACP’s Internal Medicine Meeting in the city of Doha. Changes to U.S. immigration policy and travel rules along with uncertainty around our own health care system have certainly made this an interesting time to travel ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/philip-a-masters" rel="tag" > Philip A. Masters, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

Travel Ban Is Based on Executive Whim, Not Objective Criteria
ConclusionFor countries on the list, and for any country wishing to remain off the list, it is vitally important that they understand which factors led to their inclusion or exclusion. If the United States is acting in good faith —seeking to change behavior as opposed to looking for an excuse to ban people—its criteria should be clearly explained and understood. The Iran nuclear deal, for example, hasvery precise requirements for Iran to avoid sanctions, down to the exact percentage of purity for its enriched uranium. This is very far from the case here.No consistent combination of factors or mitigating factors...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 9, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

New Economic Freedom Report on Prosperity, Gender Equality and Populism
TheEconomic Freedom of the World: 2017 Annual Reportis out today. Co-published in the United States by the Fraser Institute (Canada) and the Cato Institute, it continues to find a strong relationship between economic freedom on the one hand, and prosperity and other indicators of human well-being on the other.The United States ranks 11 out of 159 countries, indicating a slight improvement recently in its rating, but its economic freedom remains far below what it was in the year 2000, when it began a long decline. Since 1970, the index has typically ranked the United States among the top four countries. The top countries in...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 28, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Ian V ásquez Source Type: blogs

Not subject to debate
Here is a partial list of entities and people who accept that human activity is causing dangerous changes in the earth's climate.195 sovereign nations (participants in theIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). That is every country on earth including the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. It also includes countries whose economies are heavily dependent on fossil fuel extraction, such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar. The Saudis are planning to leave much of their oil in the ground. Exxon Mobil Corporation (although they lied about it for decades)Former Exxon CEO and current U.S. Secretary of State Rex TillersonVirtu...
Source: Stayin' Alive - September 19, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Is Trump Putting Us Back on the Road to War with Iran?
On Monday, the Trump administration once again officially certified that Iran is in compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), the agreement that rolled back Iran ’s nuclear program and subjected it to unprecedented levels of inspections and monitoring in exchange for sanctions relief. But, according tomultiplereports, Trump was very close to refusing to do so.Apparently, there is a split in the administration. Some of Trump ’s national security advisors, along with some hawks on Capitol Hill, are intent on torpedoing the Iran nuclear deal. And Trump was set to officially claim, contrary to...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 19, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: John Glaser Source Type: blogs

The BCRA Is An Improvement Over Obamacare. Here ’ s why..
ANISH KOKA MD Dr. Jha writes on these pages in typically stirring fashion about his views on the recent health care kerfuffle and rightly so fingers what the real focus of our efforts should be: Cost.  He ends by slaying both sides because of their refusal to confront the hospital chargemonster – the fee schedule hospitals make that remarkably only really applies to the uninsured. Unfortunately, the solution proposed ensures hospital fee schedules for the uninsured are no greater than Medicare reimbursements, which is far from perfect.  Consider that the Medicare reimbursement for a stent placed to an ische...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Economics Repeal Replace Uncategorized Anish Koka BCRA Obamacare Source Type: blogs

How the Gulf Row Could Tear Libya Apart Even Further
Since Gadhafi was removed from power, Gulf nations have been vying for position in Libya through proxy forces to influence political outcomes. Libya's rival militias — armed and funded by their respective Gulf sponsors — set the framework for the civil conflict that erupted in 2014 and continues today. Current tensions between Qatar and its neighbors are adding to the instability. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - July 7, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

Placating the Gulf States Distorts Middle East Policy
A lengthyNew York Times article over the weekend touches on a contradiction in the U.S. strategy against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Even as the United States cooperates in a de facto tactical alliance with Iran against ISIS, we ’re engaged in a longer-term strategy against Iranian influence in the Middle East. U.S. and Iranian-backed forces have even clashed in battlefield skirmishes in recent weeks.Picking a fight with an implicit ally is problematic for many reasons. Perhaps most worryingly, such clashesrisk sucking U.S. forces deeper into Syria’s civil war.The article quotes Lebanese scholar...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 12, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: John Glaser Source Type: blogs

Trade-Offs in the Middle East
During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump delighted in waving to packed crowds whilethe Rolling Stones ’“You can’t always get what you want” played.  At the time, the song seemed like a repudiation of the Republican elites who had failed to support his campaign. Today, as his Middle East policy careens off the rails, it’s a concept the President himself should learn to grasp.Mere hours afterSecretary of State Rex Tillerson announced that tensions between Qatar, Saudi Arabia and other regional states were negatively impacting the fight against ISIS and calling for all sides to defuse ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 9, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Emma Ashford Source Type: blogs

Celebrate World Teachers ’ Day With a Dose of School Matters
This article offers suggestions on negotiating more reasonable make-up policies for SLPs in schools. This column was, by far, the most viewed article in this series. Continuing the theme of missed-session policies, the most popular article among all of The ASHA Leader’s content over the past 12 months also touched on this hot topic: “OSEP Reaffirms Guidance on Missed Services in Schools.” Happy reading!   Shelley D. Hutchins is a content producer/editor for The ASHA Leader. shutchins@asha.org.  (Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases)
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - October 5, 2016 Category: Speech Therapy Authors: Shelley D. Hutchins Tags: Audiology Events News Speech-Language Pathology Advocacy Schools Source Type: blogs

Looking at EHR Internationally
Today, I’m sitting in my hotel room in Dubai (Check out my full health IT conference schedule) looking out over this incredible city. This is the 3rd time I’ve come to Dubai to teach an EHR workshop and so I’ve had a chance to fall in love with some many things. Not the least of which is the people that come to participate in the workshop. Each time is a unique perspective with people coming from around the middle east including countries like Saudia Arabia, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar, and of course Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the UAE to name a few. There’s something incredible about coming to a place that is ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - August 24, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR Healthcare HealthCare IT Dubai EHR EHR Conferences Healthcare IT Conferences Middle East EHR Saudi Arabia EHR Source Type: blogs

Tahcheen-e Esfenaj (Baked Persian Rice Cake with Lamb, Spinach & Prunes)
I must apologize for the infrequency of my blog posts over the past year. My new position at the medical school has kept me much busier than I’d ever imagined. Now, a year later, things are finally settling in and I’m hoping to bring this blog thing back to life, if only because the act of writing truly grounds me. One of the better parts of my new position has been getting to know our Qatar-based medical school faculty and staff, who sent me the most amazing Persian cookbook – Saraban: A Chef’s Journey through Persia by Greg and Lucy Malouf. (Thank you Shahrad and team!) This is a&n...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 7, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Meat & Poultry Lamb Rice Cake Spinach Tachchin Tah-Chin Tahcheen Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Forum: Global Health
Please join us on Tuesday, June 14, when Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil will host the next in a series of fora spotlighting the journal’s work in the field of global health and a multi-year partnership with the World Innovation Summit for Health. Building upon our September 2014 thematic issue, “Advancing Global Health Policy,” and the April 2013 volume, “The Triple Aim Goes Global,” the program on June 14 will explore major issues confronting the global health community. A highlight of the event will be a discussion of international health policy—led by Weil—among Victor...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 1, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Tracy Gnadinger Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs cancer care Global Health Health Affairs events Innovation Patient Safety universal health coverage Source Type: blogs

“The players — carpenters, drivers and masons — in the...
"The players — carpenters, drivers and masons — in the 4-year-old Workers Cup are just a fraction of the thousands of migrant workers who are actively building Qatar into a modern state for the 2022 @fifaworldcup. Some dream of playing professionally. Others claimed to have already played top-tier #soccer in Africa or Asia but said they decided to come to #Qatar to drive buses and build high-rises for the regular paychecks. The Workers Cup kicked off in mid-March with 24 teams, but now only 2 teams remain. The photographer Olya Morvan captured fans of Gulf Contracting celebrating the team's semifinal victo...
Source: Kidney Notes - April 27, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

April Man of the Month: Vice Adm. C. Forrest Faison III
Throughout the nation’s health care continuum, policymakers and clinicians are searching for ways to eliminate health disparities, improve cost-efficiencies, and achieve better patient outcomes. An organization making important strides in this area is the U.S. military, and a particular leader who warrants our attention is Disruptive Women in Health Care’s Man of the Month, Vice Adm. C. Forrest Faison III, Navy surgeon general and chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. A pediatrician by training, Faison is experienced in providing high-quality, patient-centered care to large, geographically dispersed population...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Man of the Month Source Type: blogs

International Women’s Day 2016
On the occasion of the International Women’s Day, Qatar University in cooperation with the Protection and Social Rehabilitation Center will organize an event “Empowering Women for What You Deserve” on 8 March 2016. Dr Khalid Al Ali, Associate Vice President … Continue reading → (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Network Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Syrian Civil War Just Became Even More Complex
Just when you thought the Syrian civil war couldn’t get any messier, developments last week proved that it could.  For the first time in the armed conflict that has raged for nearly five years, militia fighters from the Assyrian Christian community in northern Iraq clashed with Kurdish troops. What made that incident especially puzzling is that both the Assyrians and the Kurds are vehement adversaries of ISIS—which is also a major player in that region of Syria.  Logically, they should be allies who cooperate regarding military moves against the terrorist organization. But in Syria, very little is sim...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 19, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Ted Galen Carpenter Source Type: blogs

Researchers and Advocates Push to Change the WHO Vision for Aging Research and Treatment
The World Health Organization (WHO) position on aging is, as noted a few months back, well-written, incoherent, bureaucratic garbage. In essence it is a call to do nothing meaningful to treat the causes of aging, produced by people distant from the research community, who disregard the last decade of work and current scientific views on aging and longevity. This is unfortunately par for the course for large governmental organizations of this nature. Some researchers and advocates, such as those involved with the International Longevity Alliance, are keen on using the WHO as a megaphone to amplify advocacy for the treatment...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 18, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Where Do K-1 Visa Holders Come From?
Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik were killed last week in a gun battle with police after they committed a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California.  Malik entered the U.S. on a K-1 visa, known as the fiancé visa, accompanied by Farook.  Their attack is the first perpetrated by somebody on the K-1 visa - igniting a debate over increasing visa security.    The government issued approximately 262,162 K-1 visas from 2005 to 2013 – 3177 or 1.21 percent of the total to Pakistani citizens.  Senator Rand Paul’s (R-KY) SECURE Act identifies 34 countries as particularly terror-prone. ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 7, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States Have Accepted Many Syrians
Many more Syrians are living in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States than at the beginning of the Syrian civil war in 2011.  The World Bank reports that 1,000,000 Syrians resided in Saudi Arabia in 2013, a whopping 795 percent increase over 2010.  There were 1,375,064 Syrian migrants living in the Gulf States in 2013, a 470 percent increase over 2010.  Excluding Oman, the 2013 Syrian population in every Gulf State has increased dramatically since right before the beginning of the Syrian civil war.  Syrian Population Residing in Each Country   2010 2013 Increase Since 20...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 1, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Russia Follows U.S. Script to Intervene in Syria and Embarrass Washington
Vladimir Putin opened a new game of high stakes geopolitical poker, backing Syria’s President Bashir Assad. But Washington has no complaint. America has been meddling in Syria’s tragic civil war from the start. Russia’s dramatic backing for Syria’s beleaguered Assad government formally buries any illusion that “what Washington says goes,” even in the Middle East. Moscow has begun bombing regime opponents. Sounding almost like the George W. Bush administration, the Putin government insisted that it was fighting terrorism and there really wasn’t a “moderate opposition.” I...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 5, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Doug Bandow Source Type: blogs

A Covert Escalation of U.S. Involvement in Syria?
Officials often try to implement dubious or controversial initiatives over weekends or holidays, when journalists and the public are likely to be less vigilant than normal.  Three-day holiday weekends are especially popular candidates for such maneuvers.  It is perhaps unsurprising that there were indications of a significant change regarding U.S. policy toward Syria on the Sunday before Memorial Day.  Turkey’s foreign minister announced that his country and the United States had agreed in principle to provide air protection for some 15,000 Syrian rebels being trained by Ankara and Washington once thos...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 2, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Ted Galen Carpenter Source Type: blogs

Hold Politicians Accountable for Debacle in Libya
Doug Bandow Will America ever again be at peace? Pressure is building for the U.S. again to intervene in Libya. Less than three years after Libya’s civil war the country has ceased to exist. This debacle offers a clear lesson for American policymakers. But denizens of Washington seem never to learn. The administration presented the issue as one of humanitarian intervention, to save the people of Benghazi from slaughter at the hands of Libyan dictator Moammar Khadafy. Although he was a nasty character, he had slaughtered no one when his forces reclaimed other territory. In Benghazi he only threatened those who had ta...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 26, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Doug Bandow Source Type: blogs

World Innovation Summit for Health 2015 policy reports
World Innovation Summit for Health 2015 -The second World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) took place on 17-18 February 2015 at the Qatar National Convention Center. Eight Forums have been established for WISH 2015, each chaired and led by a recognised expert in the topic. Each Forum has published a report, aimed at policy makers and healthcare innovators. Diabetes Dementia Patient safety Communicating complex health messages Mental health and wellbeing in children Universal health coverage Delivering affordable cancer care WISH 2015 - full summit details (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - February 19, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Mental Health NHS measurement and performance Patient involvement, experience and feedback Patient safety Quality of care and clinical outcomes Source Type: blogs

Biden Should Not Have Apologized
Ted Galen Carpenter Vice President Joe Biden has reportedly apologized to the leaders of Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, and other Middle East countries for his previous comments that they had, perhaps inadvertently, supported Sunni extremists in the Syrian civil war.  The uproar occurred because Biden had stated that Turkey, Qatar, and the UAE had given “billions of dollars and tens of thousands of tons of weapons” to Syrian Sunni fighters seeking to overthrow Bashar al-Assad’s regime.  Those governments, he charged, had been willing to give aid to “anyone who would fight Assad.  ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 7, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Ted Galen Carpenter Source Type: blogs

Let's you and him fight
U-Cal prof As'ad AbuKhalil breaks down the Syria clusterf* for you.Point number 1 (and I said it here before), the "moderate, progressive" Free Syrian Army is and always has been bogus. They are a small conglomeration of various people who ducked under the umbrella in order to get U.S. support. Many moderate factions are actually allied with the Assad regime (which was always secular, NB). For the most part, the contending rebel factions represent various strains of Wahabism.Then you have and Iran vs. Saudi proxy war, a Saudi vs. Qatari proxy war, the Sunni vs. Shia thing which was mostly conjured up by the Saudi...
Source: Stayin' Alive - September 24, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

War! What is it good for?
What David Frum says.Speaking for myself -- and I've sort kinda said this before -- yes, these Islamic State characters are evil doers. But so are our Saudi and Qatari "allies" (when they aren't actually financing al Qaeda and similar) and so, for that matter, are we. I suppose you could say it's a matter of degree and that counts for something, but still it must be acknowledged.That acknowledged, the following perhaps less controversial points.1) The only substantively interesting statement in Obama's speech last night was that we are going to arm Iraqi and Kurdish forces. In diplomatic terms, that is extremely ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - September 11, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Think and Act Globally: Health Affairs’ September Issue
TweetThe September issue of Health Affairs emphasizes lessons learned from developing and industrialized nations collectively seeking the elusive goals of better care, with lower costs and higher quality. A number of studies analyze key global trends including patient engagement and integrated care, while others examine U.S.-based policy changes and their applicability overseas. This issue was supported by the Qatar Foundation and World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH), Hamad Medical Corporation, Imperial College London, and The Commonwealth Fund. The U.S. leads the global pack in hospital bureaucracy, no matter wh...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 8, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Chris Fleming Tags: All Categories Emergency Medicine Global Health Health Reform Hospitals Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Event Reminder: Advancing Global Health Policy
TweetPlease join us on Monday, September 8, when Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil will host a briefing to discuss our September 2014 thematic issue, “Advancing Global Health Policy.” In an expansion of last year’s theme, “The ‘Triple Aim’ Goes Global,” we explore how developing and industrialized countries around the world are confronting challenges and learning from each other on three aims: cost, quality, and population health. A highlight of the event will be a discussion of international health policy—led by Weil—featuring former CMS and FDA admini...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 5, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Chris Fleming Tags: All Categories Global Health Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Briefing: Advancing Global Health Policy
TweetPlease join us on Monday, September 8, when Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil will host a briefing to discuss our September 2014 thematic issue, “Advancing Global Health Policy.”  In an expansion of last year’s theme, “The ‘Triple Aim’ Goes Global,” we explore how developing and industrialized countries around the world are confronting challenges and learning from each other on three aims: cost, quality, and population health. A highlight of the event will be a discussion of international health policy—led by Weil—featuring former CMS and FDA administra...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 22, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Chris Fleming Tags: All Categories End-of-Life Care Global Health Health Care Delivery Hospitals Innovation Pharma Policy Source Type: blogs

Highly Misplaced Fear and Trembling
It's been amusing (I guess that's the word) watching Republican politicians freak out over the exchange of 5 Taliban prisoners for a U.S. soldier. Yes, these guys were high ranking -- actually they were mostly civilian leadership of the Taliban government. They are described as "hardened killers" but that's because the Taliban regime was violent. The only people they ever bothered were Afghans. They can't be prosecuted because they haven't violated any U.S. laws. They were prisoners of war, which means they have to be released some day.The U.S. has been trying for some time to arrange a peace deal in Afghanistan,...
Source: Stayin' Alive - June 3, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

MERS comes to Malaysia
You may have come across these recent news reports: First there was a fatality The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has killed its first victim in Asia, a Malaysian man who developed respiratory complications after returning from Mecca. The 54-year-old man, from Batu Pahat, Johor, had arrived in Malaysia on March 29 after performing the umrah. He died on Apr 13 after being admitted to the Hospital Sultanah Nora Ismail for three days, following complaints of fever, cough and breathing difficulties. Passengers onboard the Turkish Airlines flights TK93 and TK60 on the Jeddah-Istanbul-Kuala Lumpur route ...
Source: Malaysian Medical Resources - April 18, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: palmdoc Tags: Miscellaneous MERS SARS Source Type: blogs

Freedom of Thought Under Siege Around the Globe: When You are Not Free to Not Believe
Doug Bandow Much of the world has just celebrated the most sacred Christian holiday, yet persecution of Christians has never been fiercer, especially in the Middle East.  Other faiths also suffer varying degrees of persecution.  Nonbelievers also often are mistreated.  The lack of religious belief is less likely to be punished by communist and former communist regimes.  But such systems penalize almost all independent thought.  Moreover, atheists and other freethinkers are at special risk in theocratic and especially aggressively Muslim states.  The International Humanist and Ethical Union re...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 31, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Doug Bandow Source Type: blogs

Free Hiv Screening For All Pregnant Women Soon
Fifteen new cases of HIV/Aids were detected in Qatar last year, taking the total cases in the country to 276, an expert at the Supreme Council of Health (SCH) disclosed at the seminar that marked World Aids Day. Speakers stressed the importance of HIV screening for pregnant women to prevent transmission of the disease to newborns. The event for doctors was organised by Hamad Medical Corporations (HMC) Infectious Disease Department in collaboration with SCH. HIV transmission appears to be very limited in Qatar with a low HIV prevalence rate of 0.02 percent, said Dr Al Mubasher Abu Baker from SCH. A total of 276 HIV cases ha...
Source: aids-write.org - December 10, 2013 Category: HIV AIDS Authors: aidswrite Tags: current news aids news Source Type: blogs

Element Shortages, Really Light and Really Heavy
Element shortages are in the news these days. The US has been talking about shutting down its strategic helium reserve, and there are plenty of helium customers worried about the prospect. The price of liquid helium, not a commodity that you usually hear quoted on the afternoon financial report, has apparently more than tripled in the last year. I think that this is more of a gap problem than a running-out-of-helium one, though. There's still a lot of helium in the world, and the natural gas boom of recent years has made even more of it potentially available. Trapping it, though, is not cheap - this is something that has ...
Source: In the Pipeline - September 19, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Chemical News Source Type: blogs

Will Changing of the (Political) Guard Bring Reform to Qatar?
Doug Bandow The U.S. is the colossus which bestrides the globe, but Qatar is the pipsqueak which dominates the Middle East.  That’s a slight overstatement, but the tiny kingdom of Qatar has been destabilizing other nations.  There’s a new emir who would best concentrate on freeing his own people. Qatar is barely 40 years old.  For the last 18 years it was ruled by Hamad bin Khalifi al-Thani, who ousted his father in a palace coup.  Sheikh Hamad created the television channel, Al Jazeera, and annually hosted the annual Doha Forum.  I attended the internationally renowned gabfest in May,...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 16, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Doug Bandow Source Type: blogs

MERS-CoV Cases Increase to 70 with 39 Fatalities
The number of MERS-CoV cases - the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus - have increased to 70. There have been a total of 39 deaths. The World Health Organization (WHO) says it has received lab-confirmed cases of MERS in the following countries: Jordan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). France, Germany, Italy, Tunisia and the United Kingdom have reported cases, but these cases involved people who had been traveling in the Middle East. A recent report said MERS spreads easier and is deadlier than SARS. This may turn out to be true, but it is also possible there are infected people with no sy...
Source: HealthNewsBlog.com - June 26, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: mers Source Type: blogs

Washington Foolishly Tilts Towards War in Syria
Doug Bandow The bitterest fights tend to be civil wars. Today, Syria is going through such a brutal bloodletting.  The administration reportedly has decided to provide arms to Syria’s insurgents. It’s a mistake. This kind of messy conflict is precisely the sort in which Washington should avoid. Despite the end of the Cold War, the U.S. armed services have spent much of the last quarter century engaged in combat. At the very moment Washington should be pursuing a policy of peace, policymakers are preparing to join a civil war in which America’s security is not involved, other nations have much more a...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 14, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Doug Bandow Source Type: blogs