Resilience: More Than Preventing Negative Outcomes
Resilience is typically studied as either a recovery/ bouncing back factor where you return to baseline levels of functioning before an acute stressor had occurred, or as a sustainability factor where you continue performing/ adapting well despite the presence of a chronic stressor. How [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - July 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: resilience flourishing psychopathology Source Type: podcasts

Attention Networks: The role of NE
Attention has been studied heavily and as per a popular model of attention by Posner et al, we have 3 systems for attention: alerting, orienting and an executive control network. Now let me propose a radical fourth network for the same, but before I do that I want to clear some misconceptions [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - June 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: attention neurotransmitters Source Type: podcasts

"Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty" (BS 173)
Virginia “Ginger” Campbell, MD This month’s special episode of Brain Science features excerpt from the bestseller Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origin of Certainty by longtime host Dr. Ginger Campbell.. While it might seem ironic to talk about certainty during these extremely uncertain times, understanding how our brain generates the feeling of knowing or certainty is actually more relevant than ever.Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty is based on several early episodes of Brain Science and highlights the work of retired neurologist D...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - June 26, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Cognitive Science Consciousness Decision Making Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

Wellbeing - how Burmese Buddhism can help
How might Burmese Buddhism help deal with pandemic stress? Christopher Bu drew on his familial heritage and the tradition of practicing mindfulness to cope with the stresses of studying to be a doctor. He invites us to consider how the same techniques might be useful psychological tool for all healthcare workers during this challenging time. (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 10, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

How do we lead effectively through the COVID-19 pandemic?
Now more than ever, there ’s a need for effective leadership to guide healthcare teams and societies across the world through the COVID-19 pandemic. But how do you define good leadership and how can this be measured? In this podcast, leadership expert Professor Alexander Haslam discusses the surprising psychology of what m akes a truly great leader, the importance of a group identity, and how to lead a team at a time of crisis. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - May 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Dualistic model of Passion, Perseverance, Purpose and Persona
Some of you may be already familiar with the Dualistic Model of Passion as advocated by Robert Vallerand et al. To recap, passion is of two types: harmonious and obsessive. Both of them have different antecedents (autonomous vs controlled integration) and different consequents ( well-being vs [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - May 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: positive psychology DMP grit passion SDT Source Type: podcasts

COVID-19: Isolation and loneliness – is there a'social cure'?
Isolation and loneliness are part of the mental health fall-out of the COVID-19 pandemic and quarantine – but what are the most effective responses to this? Is there a'social cure'? In this podcast, Professor Catherine Haslam discusses her research into the many health benefits of social integration, as detailed in her latest book'The New Psychology of Health', and outlines how clinicians can support their patients in this important area. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - May 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Surviving the trauma: post-traumatic stress disorder in relation to COVID-19
Surviving the trauma of COVID-19: what does the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its treatment tell us about how to cope with the current pandemic? In this podcast, Professor Jonathan Bisson talks to Dr Raj Persaud about PTSD and the notion of ‘trauma’ in the context of COVID-19, including the diagnostic criteria for PTSD and evidence-based effective pharmacological and psychological approaches for its treatment and management. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - April 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Transcend: Standing on the shoulders of Maslow
This post is a book review of‘Transcend: The new science of self-actualization‘ by Scott Barry Kaufman. He, and his publishers, were kind enough to send an advance copy and I think the review is just in time, as the book is formally published, and the virtual book tour gets kick-started. I [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - April 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: Book review positive psychology Maslow Maslow's hierarchy of needs Self-actualization Source Type: podcasts

The psychology of the virus ‘super-spreader’
Like many infections COVID-19 can produce mild symptoms or none at all in some people, meaning they are not aware they are infected and can spread the virus without realising. COVID-19 may therefore be prone to the phenomenon of the ‘super-spreader’. In this podcast, Dr Raj Persaud talks to Dr Susan Campbell Bartoletti about Mary Mallon, the subject of her recent book ‘Terrible Typhoid Mary: A True Story of the Deadliest Cook in America’. Mallon was a healthy carrier of typhoid fever at the turn of the 20th century who resisted public health officials’ attempts to contain her. Can the first do...
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - April 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Look after yourself during covid-19
Continuing our series on wellbeing during the pandemic, in this podcast we speak to Occupational Psychologist Roxane Gervais about how doctors can look after themselves during the covid-19 pandemic. We discuss the importance of reaching out to friends and family during this difficult time, how to deal with the loss of control, as well how to... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 7, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

The psychology of coping with quarantine
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused many people around the world to enter a period of quarantine, but what outcome will this have on our mental health and how can we help to reduce the psychological impact? In this podcast, Professor Neil Greenberg talks to Dr Raj Persaud about how to cope with quarantine and the surprising findings of the latest psychological research on the mental effects of quarantine, as recently published by a group of mental health experts including Professor Greenberg in The Lancet –'The psychological impact of quarantine and how to reduce it: rapid review of the evidence'. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - April 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

The psychology and psychiatry of pandemics
The World Health Organization (WHO) characterised COVID-19 as a pandemic on 11 March 2020 and countries around the world are putting measures in place to combat the spread of coronavirus. How do psychological factors influence the spread of pandemic infection and the associated emotional distress and social disruption? In this podcast, Dr Raj Persaud talks to Professor Steven Taylor about his recently published book offering a comprehensive analysis of the psychology of pandemics. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - March 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Long Read Podcast: Are feelings more than skin deep?
Research in the 1960s and 1970s suggested that emotional expressions – smiling when happy, scowling when angry, and so on – were universal. This idea stood unchallenged for a generation.But a new cohort of psychologists and cognitive scientists are revisiting the data. Many researchers now think that the picture is a lot more complicated, and that facial expressions vary widely between contexts and cultures.This is an audio version of our feature: Why faces don’t always tell the truth about feelings, written by Douglas Heaven and read by Kerri Smith. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acas...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Cognitive Gadgets" with Cecilia Heyes (BS 168
Cecelia Heyes (click to play, right click to download audio) BS 168 is an interview with psychologist Cecilia Heyes from Oxford University in the UK. We talk about her fascinating book "Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking." Our focus is on exploring the evidence that several cognitive skills that appear to be unique to humans are learned from other people rather than being inherited genetically as is often assumed. Her proposal that language is a cognitive gadget NOT a cognitive instinct is controversial and has very important implications.Cognitive Gadget...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - February 28, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Brain Evolution Cognitive Science Interviews Language learning Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

Michael West - GMC Report On Wellbeing
Michael West is professor of organisational psychology, at Lancaster University, and co-author of a new GMC report into the wellbeing of NHS staff. The review he led together with the clinical psychiatrist Denise Coia, focused on primary interventions related to workplace factors and the systems that doctors work in, rather than secondary... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 10, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Emotions and Motivations
I have written a series of posts about emotions and personality and regular readers will know my fascination and commitment to the eight basic emotions perspective. I have also written about the four fundamental drives/ motivations; as a matter of fact my Psychology Today blog was titled The [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - December 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: emotion motivation eight basic emotions motvations panksepp Source Type: podcasts

13 Years of Brain Science with Dr. Ginger Campbell (BS 164
Click to play, right click to download audio I am releasing this month’s episode of Brain Science a week early so that you can enjoy it during your Holiday travels. It is our 13th Annual Review episode. I share highlights from the episodes released in 2019 (153-163) plus some personal reflections on the recent 4-part series about Consciousness.I also announced that in 2020 Brain Science will come out twice a month, on the 2nd and 4th Friday. Although the Brain Science Podcast was produced every other week during its first two years, it has been a monthly show for the last 10+ years. I hope th...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - December 20, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Source Type: podcasts

Introducing GLEO: SandyG ’s Positive Tetrad
Most of you would be familiar with Aaron Beck’s Cognitive Triad also known as the Negative Triad. To recap, a depressed person is characterized by negative views about the self, negative views about the world and negative views about the future. Guilt, shame, worthlessness, not accepting [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - December 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: depression positive psychology aaron beck Source Type: podcasts

12 December 2019: Social priming, and acoustic science
We recently launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to hear your views on the show to help us make it even better, so please help us by filling in the survey, thanks!In this episode:00:45 What’s next for social priming?How might a branch of psychological research move forward in the face of replication failures? News Feature: What’s next for psychology’s embattled field of social priming08:55 Research HighlightsKiller-whale grandmothers help their grandchildren survive, and the failed voyage of a reproduced ancient raft. Research Highlight: Why female orcas make killer grandmas;&nbs...
Source: Nature Podcast - December 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

How Do I Matter to Thee, Let Me Count The Ways!
I recently came across an article by Andrew Reece, Martin Seligman, Roy Baumeister, Barry Schwartz et al on Mattering which argued that in work/organizational contexts, action-based mattering is the way to go and it is more associated with feelings of self-efficacy rather than self-esteem. That [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - December 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: positive psychology mattering self Source Type: podcasts

Extending Ikigai: The 6P framework
Most people are familiar with the Japanese concept of Ikigai or what makes you jump out of your bed in the morning and enables you to look forward with joy to the work activities of the day. In a nutshell, its finding the sweet spot between what you are good at, what you love doing, what [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - November 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: happiness career ikigai Source Type: podcasts

JAMA Surgery : Long-term Functional, Psychological, Emotional, and Social Outcomes in Survivors of Firearm Injuries
Interview with Michael A. Vella, MD, and Mark J. Seamon, authors of Long-term Functional, Psychological, Emotional, and Social Outcomes in Survivors of Firearm Injuries (Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews - November 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Unearthing slavery in the Caribbean, and the Catholic Church ’s influence on modern psychology
Most historical accounts of slavery were written by colonists and planters. Researchers are now using the tools of archaeology to learn more about the day-to-day lives of enslaved Africans —how they survived the conditions of slavery, how they participated in local economies, and how they maintained their own agency. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about a Caribbean archaeology project based on St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands and launched by the founders of the Society for Black Archaeologists that aims to unearth these details. Watch a related video here. Sarah also talks wi...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Unearthing slavery in the Caribbean, and the Catholic Church ’s influence on modern psychology
Most historical accounts of slavery were written by colonists and planters. Researchers are now using the tools of archaeology to learn more about the day-to-day lives of enslaved Africans —how they survived the conditions of slavery, how they participated in local economies, and how they maintained their own agency. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about a Caribbean archaeology project based on St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands and launched by the founders of the Society for Black Archaeologists that aims to unearth these details. Watch a related video here. Sarah also talks wi...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Seven deadly sins of psychological science
Psychological science has made extraordinary discoveries about the human mind, but can we trust everything its practitioners are telling us? In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that a lot of research in psychology is based on weak evidence, questionable practices and sometimes even fraud. Here Dr Raj Persaud talks to Professor Chris Chambers about his recently published book ‘The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology: A Manifesto for Reforming the Culture of Scientific Practice’, in which he diagnoses the ills besetting the discipline today and proposes sensible, practical solutions for change. (Sourc...
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - October 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

Self at the Intersection of Drives and Norms
Self is the apparently unified entity that has conscious awareness of one’s actions and experiences- it is both an agent who is acting in the world willfully and an entity that is absorbing experiences passively. By some accounts self is socially constructed- it is to be found in the web of [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - September 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: psychology SDT Source Type: podcasts

Kevin Mitchell, author "Innate" (BS 159)
Kevin Mitchel (click to play interview) Every parent knows that each child is born with an unique personality. In his new book Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are. Dr. Kevin Mitchell writes “We are different from each other in large part because of the way our brains get wired before we are born.” (page 7) A key idea is that much of much of our behavior is innate but this is only partly due to genetics. Events during brain development are equally important.Listen to BS 159 now to learn more about what science is revealing about this fascinating topic. (PS: we also tal...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - July 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Development Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

Kevin Mitchell, author "Innate" (BS 159)
Kevin Mitchel (click to play interview) Every parent knows that each child is born with an unique personality. In his new book Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are. Dr. Kevin Mitchell writes “We are different from each other in large part because of the way our brains get wired before we are born.” (page 7) A key idea is that much of much of our behavior is innate but this is only partly due to genetics. Events during brain development are equally important.Listen to BS 159 now to learn more about what science is revealing about this fascinating topic. (PS: we also tal...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - July 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Development Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

Perseverance : filmy style!
I am on a mission to create Bollywood as well as Hollywood playlists for all the 24 VIA strengths and also make a list of Hindi and English movies related to that strength theme. I recently started working on Gratitude and one my dear friends Vivek Mohile asked if I can share whatever I have [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - July 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: films psychology grit movies songs strengths Source Type: podcasts

Timefulness: could geology help to shape our minds?
Our everyday lives are shaped by geological processes that vastly predate us, and our habits will in turn have consequences that will outlast us by generations. So could a greater awareness of this ‘timefulness’ give us the perspective we need for a more sustainable future? In this compelling podcast, Raj Persaud talks to Professor Marcia Bjornerud about the concept of timefulness, arguing that opening our minds to geology could benefit us all psychologically. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - June 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

The Algorithm of The Brain
I know that the computer metaphor does not do justice to the brain, but can we conceivably come up with a universal algorithm in how the brain processes stimuli and reacts/responds to them? Further, can we then tie up those algorithmic sub-modules to actual neural subsystems/structures and [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - May 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: behaviorism neuroscience neurotransmitters Brain personality Source Type: podcasts

Parenting Styles: an SDT Informed Perspective
In my previous posts I have elaborated on SDT and how it provides insights as to the relation between motivation and personality and to the supportive contexts that satisfy basic needs and thus lead to well-being. To recap, SDT, as extended by me, posits that there are four basic [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - May 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: development motivation Parenting SDT Source Type: podcasts

Supportive Contexts for Growth and Development: an SDT Perspective
Self Determination Theory(SDT) posits that all humans require some nutriments to grow and develop; just like plants need nutriments like sunlight, water, nutrients etc to flourish, so do humans have some basic human needs for autonomy, competence, relatedness and meaningfulness (my addition) to [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - May 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: development motivation stages needs SDT Source Type: podcasts

Emotions and Motivations: an SDT perspective
I have blogged previously about personality and emotions and also personality and motivations, but haven’t made an explicit linkage between emotions and motivations; today I wish to rectify that and talk about how emotions and motivations are interconnected. I will be using the Self-Determination [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - May 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: emotion motivation basic emotions Source Type: podcasts

Can fMRI Read Your Mind? (BS 156 with Russ Poldrack)
Russell Poldrack (click to play audio) This month’s episode of Brain Science is an interview with Stanford psychologist Russell A Poldrack, author of The New Mind Readers: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal about Our Thoughts. We talk about the principles of how fMRI works and how new methods are overcoming some of the problems from the early days in the field. Because Dr. Poldrack has been in the field since its infancy, he is uniquely placed to give us both an overview of the history and an analysis of its progress. We emphasize several important principles that must be honored in orde...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - April 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books brain imaging Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

Can fMRI Read Your Mind? (BS 156 with Russ Poldrack)
Russell Poldrack (click to play audio) This month’s episode of Brain Science is an interview with Stanford psychologist Russell A Poldrack, author of The New Mind Readers: What Neuroimaging Can and Cannot Reveal about Our Thoughts. We talk about the principles of how fMRI works and how new methods are overcoming some of the problems from the early days in the field. Because Dr. Poldrack has been in the field since its infancy, he is uniquely placed to give us both an overview of the history and an analysis of its progress. We emphasize several important principles that must be honored in orde...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - April 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books brain imaging Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Psychology Source Type: podcasts

An acutely disturbed person in the community
It can be difficult to know what to do when a person in severe psychological distress presents to a general practice or community clinic, particularly if they are behaving aggressively, or if they are refusing help. Most patients who are acutely disturbed present no danger to others, however situations can evolve rapidly. Frontline staff need to... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Successful Aging with psychologist Alan Castel (BS 154)
Alan Castel (Click to Play interview) BS 154 is an interview with Dr. Alan Castel, author of Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. In the past we have discussed how our brain changes as we age, but it turns out successful aging requires more than "good genes." Our attitudes and our behaviors have a huge impact. More importantly, it is never too early to begin preparing for successful aging. How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Buy Episode Transcript for $3. [Free for Premium subscribers]Premium Subscribers have unlim...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - February 22, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Interviews Memory Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

Successful Aging with psychologist Alan Castel (BS 154)
Alan Castel (Click to Play interview) BS 154 is an interview with Dr. Alan Castel, author of Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. In the past we have discussed how our brain changes as we age, but it turns out successful aging requires more than "good genes." Our attitudes and our behaviors have a huge impact. More importantly, it is never too early to begin preparing for successful aging. How to get this episode:FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)Buy Episode Transcript for $3. [Free for Premium subscribers]Premium Subscribers have unlim...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - February 22, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Interviews Memory Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

The Four Educative Drives
I have recently come across the blog and work of Peter Gray, and am finding it very useful to see things from his perspective– which at times is very much aligned with my own. In one of his posts he talks about self-directed education and the four basic drives in all children around which [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - February 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: education ABCD curiosity planfulness playfulness sociability Source Type: podcasts

Pollution from pot plants, and how our bodies perceive processed foods
The “dank” smelling terpenes emitted by growing marijuana can combine with chemicals in car emissions to form ozone, a health-damaging compound. This is especially problematic in Denver, where ozone levels are dangerously high and pot farms have sprung up along two highways in the city. Host Sarah C respi talks with reporter Jason Plautz about researchers’ efforts to measure terpene emissions from pot plants and how federal restrictions have hampered them. Next, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Dana Small, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at Yale University, about how processed foods are perc...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Pollution from pot plants, and how our bodies perceive processed foods
The “dank” smelling terpenes emitted by growing marijuana can combine with chemicals in car emissions to form ozone, a health-damaging compound. This is especially problematic in Denver, where ozone levels are dangerously high and pot farms have sprung up along two highways in the city. Host Sarah C respi talks with reporter Jason Plautz about researchers’ efforts to measure terpene emissions from pot plants and how federal restrictions have hampered them. Next, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Dana Small, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at Yale University, about how processed foods are perc...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

4 Life Goals, 4 Selves
I have blogged previously about the 4 major goals of life: Happiness (H), Success (S), Meaning (M) and Morality/Virtue (V). Each goal is important in itself and a healthy human being constantly balances all four goals for optimal outcome. Some people group all of these major goals of life [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - December 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: happiness Morality selves Source Type: podcasts

The Evolution of Cooperation: Thankfulness and Inspiration as Two Routes
Cooperation or Altruism or Prosociality is the tendency to help others, even at a cost to oneself. Naive conceptions of evolution, make us think that cooperation or altruism cannot evolve because the genes are selfish and only care about perpetuating themselves. However, the selfish gene view of [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - December 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: altruism emotion elevation evolution gratitude Source Type: podcasts

Talking therapy for the management of mental health in low- and middle-income countries affected by mass human tragedy
Evidence Aid, an organisation dedicated to improving the use of evidence in humanitarian crises, highlights information from Cochrane and other systeamic reviews of particular relevance to those involved in humanitarian assistance and, in July 2018, these were added to by a report on psychological therapies for the treatment of mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries. We asked one of the authors, Marianna Purgato from the University of Verona in Italy, to tell us about this new Cochrane Review. (Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library)
Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library - November 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Cochrane Source Type: podcasts

The Impact Of The Psychosocial Milieu On Quality Of Life And Survival
CRISTIANE DECAT BERGEROT, PhDPSYCHOLOGIST, POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWCITY OF HOPE COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER discusses THE IMPACT OF THE PSYCHOSOCIAL MILIEU ON QUALITY OF LIFE AND SURVIVAL At the Sevent... Author: kidneycancer Added: 11/08/2018 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - November 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The Formula for Success and Happiness
Successful people are not necessarily happy and happy people are not necessarily successful.   There are always trade-offs involved in life and depending on our priorities, we may want to become better at being more successful or happier, or lead lives that are more moral or more meaningful. I’m not [...]Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - September 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: psychology Source Type: podcasts

Love- in All its Glorious Forms
Love for a child, is not the same as love for a friend, which is not the same as love for a partner- we all instinctively realize this fact– yet we also admit that there must be something common in our interactions with these people that enables us to label that experience as love, and that [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast) (Source: The Mouse Trap)
Source: The Mouse Trap - August 31, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: love Positive psychology Source Type: podcasts