Immigrants: citizens' acceptance depends on questions asked
(Universit é de Gen è ve) How many immigrants per year should Switzerland be prepared to welcome? Psychologists (UNIGE) set about testing a well-known reasoning bias that consists in providing a deliberately figure for information purposes before respondents give their opinion on a subject. The researchers found that the figure supplied played a vital role in shaping respondents' opinions, regardless of their political orientation or the political party responsible for the figure. The researchpoints out the dangers of number-based political votes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to spot signs of and treat depression
A new study in the Journal of Pediatrics finds the number of suicides between 2000 and 2018 by self-poisoning has soared especially among teenage girls. The American Psychiatric Association says one out of every six people will suffer from depression at some point in their lives. Dr. David Agus and psychologist Lisa Damour join "CBS This Morning" to discuss mental fitness and clinical depression. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Speed preferences in work zones: the combined effect of visible roadwork activity, personality traits, attitudes, risk perception and driving style - Steinbakk RT, Ulleberg P, Sagberg F, Fostervold KI.
One of the most common safety issues at work zones is high speed variation. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed psychological variables to deepen the understanding of drivers' speed choice in work zones. The present study examined whether work zones r... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Alexithymic traits are closely related to impulsivity and cognitive and empathic dysfunctions in intimate partner violence perpetrators: new targets for intervention - Romero-Mart ínez Á, Lila M, Moya-Albiol L.
Clinical psychologists are interested in studying factors that interfere with the behavioral regulation of perpetrators of intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW), as well as the way these factors affect the risk of future recidivism after interven... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Effects of a judo training on functional fitness, anthropometric, and psychological variables in old novice practitioners - Ciaccioni S, Capranica L, Forte R, Chaab ène H, Pesce C, Condello G.
This study aimed to investigate the effects of a four-month judo training (1-hr session, bi-weekly) on physical and mental health of older adults (69.7 ±4.2 years). Participants (N=30) were assigned to a judo novice practitioners group (JG=16) or a control... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Depression and anxiety symptoms are related to problematic smartphone use severity in Chinese young adults: fear of missing out as a mediator - Elhai JD, Yang H, Fang J, Bai X, Hall BJ.
INTRODUCTION: Recently studies examined mediating psychological constructs accounting for relations between both depression and anxiety with problematic smartphone use (PSU) severity. The aim of the current study was to analyze the fear of missing out (FOM... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

More Teens Are Attempting Suicide By Poisoning. Here ’s What Parents Should Know
Suicide rates are on the rise in the U.S. across age groups and demographics. But in recent years, increases have been particularly pronounced among teenagers — especially girls, who die by suicide less frequently than boys but attempt it more often. Intentional self-poisoning is the leading type of suicide attempt for adolescents (and the third-leading cause of suicide deaths), and a new study confirms that numbers here, too, are rising. The research, published in the Journal of Pediatrics, found that suicide attempts by poisoning have doubled in frequency among kids younger than 19, rising from almost 40,000 attemp...
Source: TIME: Health - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Personal Encounters With'God' Confer Mental Health Benefits Personal Encounters With'God' Confer Mental Health Benefits
Individuals often report lasting, positive changes in their psychological health after spontaneous or psychedelic-induced'God'experiences, a new study shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 30, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Woman reveals she is considering a hysterectomy at just 22 to rid her of the extreme PMS
Charlotte Atkinson, of Greenwich, has PMDD, a severe type of PMS. It can cause severe psychological symptoms of anxiety and depression, putting Miss Atkinson's life on hold every month. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The psychology of smartphones, movies, music, and AI to be featured at APS Convention
(Association for Psychological Science) Leading scientists will share the latest findings on our interactions with art, health information, technology and more at the 31st Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science (APS), May 23-26 in Washington, D.C. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MUSC psychologists release results of survey of 'Maria generation' kids
(Medical University of South Carolina) Psychologists from the Medical University of South Carolina have just published one of the largest post-disaster screening projects in U.S. history. The report, available online through JAMA Network Open, measured the magnitude of Hurricane Maria's impact on the mental health of children in Puerto Rico. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When a 'she' becomes an 'it'
(Università di Trento) What happens in the human brain when a woman is put on a par with an object? A research answering this question was conducted at the Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science and the Center for Mind/Brain Sciences (CiMEC) of the University of Trento and was published today in " Scientific Reports " . The results could provide new instruments and insights in the study of gender and racial violence (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wealthy, Male American Students Are More Likely to BS, Study Says
Students who are wealthier and male are more likely than others to claim that they know more than they actually do, says a new study. The study, which reviewed surveys of 40,000 15-year-old students from across nine English-speaking countries, found that boys and people from wealthier families are more likely to be “bullshitters,” which it defines as “individuals who claim knowledge or expertise in an area where they actually have little experience at all.” The study, which was published by the IZA Institute of Labor Economics, looked at survey data attached to the Programme for International Studen...
Source: TIME: Health - April 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

Wealthy, Male American Students Are More Likely to BS, Study Says
Students who are wealthier and male are more likely than others to claim that they know more than they actually do, says a new study. The study, which reviewed surveys of 40,000 15-year-old students from across nine English-speaking countries, found that boys and people from wealthier families are more likely to be “bullshitters,” which it defines as “individuals who claim knowledge or expertise in an area where they actually have little experience at all.” The study, which was published by the IZA Institute of Labor Economics, looked at survey data attached to the Programme for International Studen...
Source: TIME: Science - April 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

When To Screen For Autism? New Study Suggests As Young As 14 Months
(CNN) — When screening for autism spectrum disorder, a new study suggests that children can be reliably diagnosed with autism at an age earlier than what is currently recommended. Current recommendations are for children to be screened specifically for autism spectrum disorder during regular doctor visits at 18 and 24 months old. Yet new data suggest that autism detection and diagnosis can start as young as 14 months old with high accuracy, which could lead to children with autism having the option to start therapies early, according to the study published in the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics on Monday. “This...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Autism CNN Source Type: news

Understanding women's responses to sexual pain after female genital cutting: an integrative psychological pain response model - Connor JJ, Brady SS, Chaisson N, Mohamed FS, Robinson BBE.
The World Health Organization estimates that over 200 million women and girls have experienced female genital cutting (FGC). Many women and girls who have undergone FGC have migrated to areas of the world where providers are unfamiliar with the health need... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Utilization of and barriers to treatment among suicide decedents: results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience Among Servicemembers (Army STARRS) - Zuromski KL, Dempsey CL, Ng THH, Riggs-Donovan CA, Brent DA, Heeringa SG, Kessler RC, Stein MB, Ursano RJ, Benedek D, Nock MK.
OBJECTIVE: To examine suicide decedents' use of mental health treatment and perceived barriers to initiating and maintaining treatment. METHOD: We used a psychological autopsy study conducted as part of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Relation between psychological restorativeness and lifestyle, quality of life, resilience, and stress-coping in forest settings - Takayama N, Morikawa T, Bielinis E.
Previous research has mainly dealt with the physiological and psychological restorative effects of the forest environment. However, comparatively few studies have focused on how the traits and attributes of individuals (individual traits) affect the restor... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Relationships between social capital, social capital satisfaction, self-esteem, and depression among elderly urban residents: analysis of secondary survey data - Lee HJ, Lee DK, Song W.
The role that psychological variables play in depression among elderly urban residents has received little research attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between social capital, social capital satisfaction, self-e... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Disaster exposure and mental health among Puerto Rican youths after Hurricane Maria - Orengo-Aguayo R, Stewart RW, de Arellano MA, Su árez-Kindy JL, Young J.
IMPORTANCE: Quantifying the magnitude of disaster exposure and trauma-related symptoms among youths is critical for deployment of psychological services in underresourced settings. Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017, resulti... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Editorial: The psychology of suicide: from research understandings to intervention and treatment - Levi-Belz Y, Gvion Y, Apter A.
It goes without saying that suicide is a major health problem and a leading cause of death worldwide (1, 2). Recent reports inform that around a million people die by suicide annually, representing an annual global age-standardized suicide rate of 11.4 ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How religious experiences may benefit mental health
New research examines the psychological effects of having deep religious or mystical experiences, whether they are induced by psychedelic drugs or not. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychology / Psychiatry Source Type: news

Podcast: Light therapy for prevention of winter depression
Many people experience the " winter blues " , but some suffer from something more serious, seasonal affective disorder, which has a major impact on their quality of life. Light therapy is one of the interventions that is used to try to prevent it and a team of researchers from Austria and the USA published the update of their Cochrane Review in March 2019. Lead author, Barbara Nussbaumer, from the Danube University Krems in Austria, summarises the findings in this podcast." Seasonal affective disorder, which is also known as winter depression, is a seasonal pattern of recurrent major depressive episodes. The...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 29, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Your present self is your best future self, according to new research
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) Predicting similarity over time is strongly related to happiness later on in life according to new study appearing Social Psychological and Personality Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Different for girls: understanding autism
Girls with autism are often misdiagnosed, but a new graphic novel aims to put them in the pictureAt secondary school, they become the “leftover girls”, drifting, alienated and often miserably lonely because the other teenage girls won’t accept them. It’s not thatautistic girls don ’t want friends – they are as desperate for friends as any teenager – but in a world which denies, rejects and ignores them, they are simply not wired to understand the only social role available to them: that of a neurotypical girl living an ordinary life.Dr Sarah Bargiela wants to reach these girls. Wit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Amelia Hill Tags: Life and style Women Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Therapies For The Mentally Well: Proven Techniques For Building Your Positive Psychology
Evidence-based techniques for overcoming psychological problems can be adapted to help us achieve personal goals and ideals. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 27, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brett Steenbarger, Contributor Source Type: news

Therapy saved a refugee child. Fifty years on, he ’s leading a mental health revolution
Psychologist Peter Fonagy tells of his own struggles in early life as the Anna Freud charity that he heads opens a major new centre for traumatised childrenIn 1967, a young Hungarian refugee sent to live in Britain planned on ending his life. “At 16 I was a very depressed adolescent, I had suicidal ideation, I had suicidal plans,” Peter Fonagy recalls. “If I was assessing myself now I would be very worried about me, because I knew exactly how I was going to do it. The reason is not that subtle or surprising: I was a Hungarian boy, who had landed in England and was not able to speak English.”Lodging ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Doward and Sam Hall Tags: Mental health Children Psychology Psychiatry Society London UK news Source Type: news

The New Old Age: Ageism: A ‘ Prevalent and Insidious ’ Health Threat
The World Health Organization has begun four studies intended to define ageism and identify ways to combat it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAULA SPAN Tags: Age, Chronological Discrimination Elderly Psychology and Psychologists Workplace Hazards and Violations Advertising and Marketing Social Media Youth American Journal of Public Health Cornell University World Health Organization Butle Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is the GAPS diet? A complete overview
The GAPS diet aims to ‘cure’ psychological conditions such as autism and dyslexia by changing a person’s diet. We look at the evidence, uses, and controversies around this dietary intervention. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Mental health CRISIS: One in FOUR will experience mental disorder in next YEAR - video
ONE in four people will develop a diagnosable psychological condition over the next year, according to a leading expert in mental health treatments. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Differences in linguistic and psychological characteristics between suicide notes and diaries - Kim K, Choi S, Lee J, Sea J.
The objective of this study was to explore linguistic and psychological differences in suicide notes and the diaries of non-suicidal people. Fifty-six suicide notes and 56 personal diary entries were analyzed to provide basic descriptive data on linguistic... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Another victim of violence: Trust in those who mean no harm
(Yale University) Exposure to violence does not change the ability to learn who is likely to do harm, but it does damage the ability to place trust in 'good people,' psychologists at Yale and University of Oxford report April 26 in the journal Nature Communications (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A personality test for ads
(Society for Consumer Psychology) People leave digital footprints online, and this information could helps marketers personalize ads based on individual personality types. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: If Your Spouse Is Happy, You May Live Longer
BOSTON (CBS) — “Happy wife, happy life”, as the saying goes. Now researchers say they have data to support this old adage. A new study in the journal Psychological Science shows that having a happy wife, husband, or life partner, can help extend your life. Researchers looked at survey data on 4,400 couples in the U.S. over the age of 50. They found that people who had a happy partner at the beginning of the study were less likely to die over the next eight years compared with those who had less happy partners, regardless of household income or baseline health. In fact, a spouse’s life satisfaction s...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall HealthWatch Source Type: news

It ’s Not Your Imagination: That Toddler is Judging You
There are few things as irresistible as the face of a toddler: the tiny nose, the ingenuous eyes, the utter scrumptiousness of the cheeks. Well, guess what. They don’t think nearly as highly of your face. Kids may not say it, but by the time they’re as young as three, they give you a good hard look the moment they meet you—and they judge a lot by what they see. It may be no surprise that young humans—like all humans—look to the face first for clues about the kindness, approachability and even competence of new people. But according to a new study conducted by a group of researchers from Harvar...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

It ’s Not Your Imagination: That Toddler is Judging You
There are few things as irresistible as the face of a toddler: the tiny nose, the ingenuous eyes, the utter scrumptiousness of the cheeks. Well, guess what. They don’t think nearly as highly of your face. Kids may not say it, but by the time they’re as young as three, they give you a good hard look the moment they meet you—and they judge a lot by what they see. It may be no surprise that young humans—like all humans—look to the face first for clues about the kindness, approachability and even competence of new people. But according to a new study conducted by a group of researchers from Harvar...
Source: TIME: Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about Piaget's stages of cognitive development
Some psychologists believe that children go through four separate stages of cognitive development, which they call Piaget ’s stages. Learn more about these stages, what they mean, and how to use them, here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychology / Psychiatry Source Type: news

Americans Are Some of the Most Stressed-Out People in the World, a New Global Survey Says
Americans are some of the most stressed-out people in the world, according to Gallup’s annual Global Emotions report. For the report, Gallup polled about 1,000 adults in countries around the world last year about the emotions they’d experienced the day before the survey. Negative emotions and experiences — stress, anger, worry, sadness and physical pain — were common around the world, tying 2017’s record-setting levels, the report found. In the U.S., 55% of respondents told Gallup they’d felt a lot of stress the day before, well above the global average of 35%. Gallup’s research fo...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Cliques, clubs and cults: the treacherous allure of belonging | sarah henstra
Whether it is a social movement or a secret society, humans love to be part of something bigger than ourselves. Novelist Sarah Henstra looks at what we gain from group identity – and what we loseTwo years ago, I drove eight hours south from Toronto with two friends to participate in the Women ’s March on Washington DC. That night we hand-lettered our posters (“This pussy grabs back!”) and stitched up the final seams of our pink knitted hats. In the morning, as we descended an escalator to a subway platform awash in pink, we soon realised the march was way too big – 500,000 people – to ta...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Henstra Tags: Books Culture Protest Women Psychology Sigmund Freud Bullying Source Type: news

Rehabilitation psychologists: #SayTheWord disability
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A group of female rehabilitation psychologists with disabilities highlight the need for clinicians, educators and disability allies to normalize the word 'disability.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How cortisol affects exposure therapy for anxiety disorders
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Bochum-based psychologists have studied how the application of the stress hormone cortisol affects exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. The researchers knew from earlier studies that extinction learning, which constitutes the foundation of exposure therapy, can be reinforced by administering cortisol. However, the team has demonstrated with a group of arachnophobics that an application of cortisol after exposure is not beneficial for the patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tech fixes can't protect us from disinformation campaigns
(Ohio State University) More than technological fixes are needed to stop countries from spreading disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, according to two experts. Policymakers and diplomats need to focus more on the psychology behind why citizens are so vulnerable to disinformation campaigns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dentists underdiagnose when faced with time pressure, research shows
This study shows that we shouldn't be cutting appointment times in order to fit more people in, but looking at other ways to meet the patient needs. "### (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - April 25, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

High replicability in personality psychology
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rai, T. S. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Can Anxiety Cause High Blood Pressure? Here ’s What the Research Says
Anxiety is part of life. You feel it when you’re stuck in traffic, harried at work or worrying about your family and finances. There’s no doubt that feeling anxious can elevate your blood pressure, at least in the short term. “Our mind and our thoughts certainly are connected to our hearts,” says Dr. Christopher Celano, associate director of the Cardiac Psychiatry Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital. When something makes you anxious—whether it’s a life-threatening emergency or persistent worry—your sympathetic nervous system initiates a fight-or-flight response that ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Putting Down Your Phone May Help You Live Longer
By raising levels of the stress-related hormone cortisol, our phone time may also be threatening our long-term health. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CATHERINE PRICE Tags: Anxiety and Stress Text Messaging Mobile Applications Addiction (Psychology) Cortisol (Hormone) Smartphones Brain Social Media Driver Distraction and Fatigue Dopamine Source Type: news

Health Tip: Anger Management
-- Anger is a normal, healthy emotion. However, when it becomes destructive or uncontrollable, it can lead to lower quality of life for you and those around you, says the American Psychological Association. If you're unsure of the severity of your... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Policies valuing cultural diversity improve minority students' sense of belonging
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) Psychology researchers exploring the belonging and achievement of middle school students found valuing cultural diversity reduces achievement gaps over the course of a year, while policies that favor colorblindness and assimilation led to wider achievement gaps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who really hit the basketball out of bounds?
(Arizona State University) When a basketball is knocked out of bounds, it matters who touched it last. Determining which player touched last is often not so simple but can have consequences, especially during playoff basketball. Researchers from the ASU Department of Psychology have found people consistently experience their own actions as happening 50 milliseconds earlier than other people's actions. This self-centered bias in touch perception provides a new quantifiable example of how experience does not always match reality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ideas spread like disease: Let ’s treat them with the same caution | Nick Enfield
We will one day look back and be amazed at the reckless way in which people treated information on social mediaWhen you “like” a story online, you’re not just telling your social media followers that you like it, you’re also exposing them to that story. And they, in turn, can expose others, and so on. We are interconnected in ways we can hardly imagine, and our little online actions can have big consequences. That can be a good thing, if the stories we share contain valuable information or ideas. But what if the information is false? Falsehoods are dangerous, and when they spread they can cause real...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nick Enfield Tags: Social media Digital media Psychology Source Type: news