Sex comes before emotional bonding in modern relationships
Psychologists, from the University of Rochester in New York and the IDC Herzliya in Israel, have found that physical intimacy helps people form deep emotional bonds. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A multi-dimensional evaluation of craving and impulsivity among people admitted for alcohol-related problems in emergency department - Flaudias V, Teisseidre F, de Chazeron I, Chalmeton M, Bertin C, Izaute M, Chakroun-Baggioni N, Pereira B, Brousse G, Maurage P.
This study proposes an integrative evaluation of craving (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS and Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Sca... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

The time for action is at hand - Rosenbaum DA, Feghhi I.
The science of mental life and behavior has paid scant attention to the means by which mental life is translated into physical behavior. Why this is so was the topic of a 2005 American Psychologist article whose main title was "The Cinderella of Psychology... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Struggling with New Year's resolutions? We can help
Nine ways to boost your willpower, from dodging doughnuts to making the most of morningsIt is tempting, when your shiny New Year ’s resolutions start to crumble, to tell yourself that self-control simply isn’t your strong point. “Oh well,” you might say, surrendering to the desire for a large glass of red. “No willpower, that’s my problem.”But, according to a body of scientific research, willpower is not a talent that a lucky few are born with. It is a skill to be practised. “Willpower is a dynamic, fluctuating resource,” explains Frank Ryan, consultant clinical psychol...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Anita Chaudhuri Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Psychology Source Type: news

Left-wing lunacy invades the behavioral sciences as American Psychological Association labels masculinity "harmful"
(Natural News) Traditional masculinity was the driving force behind the exploration of the Americas. The grit and determination of traditional masculinity established the first thirteen colonies on the North American continent. The toughness and aggressiveness of traditional masculinity paved a path into the unknown, fought for independence, and established founding principles for the greatest country... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women are up to 15% more likely to become pregnant if they ORGASM
A study by Dr Robert King, a lecturer in applied psychology at University College Cork, suggests that when a woman orgasms, muscles in her uterus contract, 'pushing' sperm along. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HAPPINESS Project increases access to mental health treatment in Nigeria
Co-founded by Yale psychologist Dr. Theddeus Iheanacho, the program aims to improve mental health and epilepsy treatment in the country's underserved areas. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - January 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

'Traditional masculinity' is harmful, top psychologists say in new guidelines  
The warning was issued in a 36-page document by the American Psychological Association, its first set of guidelines on male mental health in 127 years. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Orchid and the Dandelion by W Thomas Boyce review – which are you?
This study by a paediatric health expert considers why children with the greatest potential are also the ones most likely to falterSome people seem to have terrible childhoods and yet manage to thrive despite them. Others grow up in loving homes but suffer from mental and physical health difficulties, even if their siblings do not. Why?Research shows that about 15 to 20 % of children experience well over half of the recorded psychological illnesses. The remaining 75 to 80 % are comparatively healthy. This pattern continues into adulthood, and appears to be true for children around the world.Continue reading... (Source: Gua...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Phillippa Perry Tags: Science and nature books Society books Culture Psychology Source Type: news

Socioemotional dynamics of emotion regulation and depressive symptoms: a person-specific network approach - Yang X, Ram N, Gest SD, Lydon-Staley DM, Conroy DE, Pincus AL, Molenaar PCM.
Socioemotional processes engaged in daily life may afford and/or constrain individuals' emotion regulation in ways that affect psychological health. Recent findings from experience sampling studies suggest that persistence of negative emotions (emotion ine... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Constant cravings: is addiction on the rise?
From sex to sugar to social media, people are in the grip of a wider range of compulsive behaviours.But what is driving them – and what can be done?Addiction was once viewed as an unsavoury fringe disease, tethered to substances with killer withdrawal symptoms, such as alcohol and opium. But now the scope of what humans can be addicted to seems to have snowballed, from sugar to shopping to social media. The UK ’s first NHS internet-addiction clinic is opening this year; the World Health Organization (WHO) has included gaming disorder in its official addictions diagnosis guidelines.The first glimmer of this shif...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Amy Fleming Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Psychology Science Neuroscience Source Type: news

Anxiety, Depression and PTSD After Critical Illness Anxiety, Depression and PTSD After Critical Illness
How prevalent are these psychological conditions among survivors of critical illness?Critical Care (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Are your Facebook friends making you feel sick?
(Elsevier) As social networking activity has become pervasive, researchers have been taking a closer look at its impact on our psychological and physical health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lemon grass tea is good for your brain, study finds
(Natural News) Here is another good reason to drink tea made from lemon grass (Cymbopogon Lemongrass). In a recently-published African study, an extract derived from the plant has been shown to protect the memory of mice from scopolamine-induced amnesia. Amnesia is a condition where memories are largely forgotten. It can stem from aging, diseases, psychological trauma, physical damage... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The midlife crisis isn't real! Psychologist argues there is 'little evidence' behind it
Various studies show a decline in life satisfaction does exist between 30 and 70. However, Professor Nick Haslam, at the University of Melbourne, says 'crises' could happen at any point in life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Instagram takes a toll on influencers' brains
Research suggests the platform fosters anxiety as we compare ourselves to othersLike many 24-year-olds, Alexandra Mondalek, a fashion reporter in New York, found herself obsessing over social media. Her rapidly growing fashion-focused Instagram account,@hautetakes, was gaining attention, with a little more than 1,000 followers, and it was all she could think about. She wasn ’t making money from it yet, but Mondalek wondered if she could reach “influencer” status if she kept at it.“I was putting too much weight into who was viewing my Instagram,” says Mondalek, who started posting photos of the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jenni Gritters for Medium Tags: Instagram Technology US news Social media Psychology Source Type: news

Soft Skills in Crisis Management for Responders
Source: DisasterReady.org. Published: 10/23/2018. The goal of this course is to equip participants with the skill set to provide effective emotional support to a person affected by a crisis. It consists of six lessons: Lesson 1: Principles of Effective Crisis Response; Lesson 2: Assessment of Crisis Level; Lesson 3: Crisis Reactions; Lesson 4: Crisis Response Strategies and Techniques; Lesson 5: Self Care for Crisis Responders; and Lesson 6 (Optional): Psychological First Aid. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New theory of ethics may transform moral psychology
(Bar-Ilan University) In his book, Ethics and Attachment: How we make moral judgments (Routledge), Israeli psychologist Aner Govrin, Ph.D., of Bar-Ilan University, suggests an innovative framework for understanding moral judgment. His theory shows for the first time that moral judgment is a computation process, and people from different cultures compute moral judgments in the same manner even though they reach different, and even conflicting, conclusions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Harder To Handle As You Age, Expert Says
COLUMBUS, OHIO (CBS) – It only gets harder for adults to handle alcohol as they get older, according to an addiction medicine specialist. Aging also makes people more vulnerable to alcoholism, he says. Ohio State University clinical psychologist Brad Lander writes that older people process alcohol less efficiently in their bodies than when they were younger. “As we age, it takes longer for the body to break down alcohol,” he says. “It stays in the system longer. Tolerance also decreases.” Lander says that among seniors, women are more likely than men to develop alcoholism. And while younger pe...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alcohol Local TV Source Type: news

These Are the Best Ways to Improve Your Memory
All day every day, your brain is bombarded with new information. Confronted with this tsunami of sensory and cerebral input, it’s no wonder much of it slips through your memory’s grasp. But if you feel like you’re forgetting more than you should—or if you just want to pump up your retention and recall—there are some science-backed ways to improve your memory. Start with exercise. A recent study appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that just 10 minutes of light exercise was enough to increase patterns of brain activity associated with memory improvements. This ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Brain Source Type: news

Impact of parental acute psychological distress on young child pain-related behavior through differences in parenting behavior during pediatric burn wound care - Brown EA, De Young A, Kimble R, Kenardy J.
This study tested parenting behavior as a mediator for the relationship between parental acute psychological distress and child behavior during... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Whites struggle to tell real from fake smiles on black faces
(American Psychological Association) White people and non-black minorities have a harder time telling the difference between genuine and fake smiles on black faces than they do on white faces, a problem black people don't have, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Implicit attitudes can change over the long term
(Association for Psychological Science) Data from more than 4 million tests completed between 2004 and 2016 show that Americans' explicit and implicit attitudes toward certain social groups are becoming less biased over time, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?
(University of California - Los Angeles) How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, a team of UCLA cognitive psychologists reports in the journal PLOS Computational Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Jazmine Barnes Case Shows How Trauma Can Affect Memory
Eyewitness testimony is unreliable because people try to understand a traumatic event by using what they know about the world and fill in gaps, experts said. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SANDRA E. GARCIA Tags: Cortisol (Hormone) Brain Psychology and Psychologists Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Memory Barnes, Jazmine (d 2018) Source Type: news

Author, Psychologist Delves into Physician Addiction, the Opioid...
Bill McCausland, who has treated addicted doctors for decades, presents a compelling fictional story that parallels current healthcare industry issues related to the rampant over-prescription of...(PRWeb January 07, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/author_psychologist_delves_into_physician_addiction_the_opioid_epidemic_in_new_book/prweb15999967.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Book Review: Dancing on the Tightrope
We all face challenges in life, and more often than not, we feel they are unique to our lives and unlike other peoples’ challenges. However, according to Beth Kurland, PhD, the challenges of being human are more common than we might believe. She writes, “There are five core evolutionary challenges that we all face as human beings that can take us away from living our lives most fully.” In her new book, Dancing on the Tightrope: Transcending the Habits of Your Mind & Awakening to Your Fullest Life, Kurland shows us that it is in understanding these challenges, and the habits they are characterized by, ...
Source: Psych Central - January 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personality Psychology Self-Help Stress Acceptance And Commitment Therapy beth kurland Dancing on the Tightrope Source Type: news

Book clinic: which books show how group scenarios corrupt the individual?
Intrigued by peer pressure or power plays? Our expert suggests novels and psychoanalysis that get a grip on group politicsQ: I am interested in the way people can become morally corrupted in group scenarios. Which books best show how and why this happens?Calum Michael, 22,engineeringstudent, GlasgowA:Lisa Appignanesi, author,visitingprofessor in literature at King ’sCollege London andchair of the Royal Society of Literature:Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lisa Appignanesi Tags: Psychology Books George Orwell Margaret Atwood William Golding Sigmund Freud Culture Source Type: news

Faulty Wiring Blamed for Deadly ‘Escape Room’ Fire in Poland
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Polish firefighters on Saturday blamed substandard electrical wiring and lax security procedures at an "Escape Room" for a fire that killed five teenage girls and injured a man. The bodies of the 15-year-old victims were found Friday in Koszalin, in northern Poland, after firefighters extinguished a blaze in an adjacent room. Asphyxiation is the probable cause of the deaths. A young man was hospitalized with burns. Initially described as a 25-year-old, the hospital said he was 26. Poland's firefighting chief, Leszek Suski, said Saturday that electrical wiring at the location was makesh...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 5, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Major Incidents International News Source Type: news

Mental health status and its relationship with accident and unsafe behavior in a printing and press industry, 2014 - Khandan M, Koohpaei A.
Physical and psychological health of workers is critical factors in the performance of their works. Also, the number of fatal occupational accidents is high in our country. Based on these facts assessment and control of accidental determinants as well as t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Write that thank-you letter and it will make YOU happy, says Dr Max the mind doctor
Showing your appreciation for someone ’s thoughtfulness is more than just good manners, it’s a boost to one’s mental health, too. Psychologists call it ‘gratitude therapy’. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why does it feel good to see someone fail?
Shensheng Wang, a PhD candidate in psychology at Emory University, explains the latest research on schadenfreude and why it appears to be so closely linked to empathy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Being Bored Can Be Good for You —If You Do It Right. Here’s How
If you’re waiting for brilliance to strike, try getting bored first. That’s the takeaway of a study published recently in the journal Academy of Management Discoveries, which found that boredom can spark individual productivity and creativity. In the study, people who had gone through a boredom-inducing task — methodically sorting a bowl of beans by color, one by one — later performed better on an idea-generating task than peers who first completed an interesting craft activity. (The task: to come up with excuses for being late that wouldn’t make someone look bad.) The bored folks outperformed...
Source: TIME: Health - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Natural mentoring relationships as a protective factor for victims of bullying - Drevon DD, Kim SY, Fredrick SS.
School bullying is associated with a host of unfavorable psychosocial outcomes, even as victims enter college. Thus, the identification of modifiable protective factors remains an important goal of psychological research in the context of resilience theory... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

University and community resources for sexual assault survivors: familiarity with and use of services among college students - Franklin CA, Menaker TA, Jin HR.
Scholars have highlighted the prevalence of sexual assault on college campuses. Universities are generally equipped to address victimization through a range of resources, including counseling and psychological services. These resources are instrumental for... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Violence in school: an investigation of physical, psychological, and sexual victimization reported by Italian adolescents - Longobardi C, Prino LE, Fabris MA, Settanni M.
In Italy, numerous studies have been carried out regarding the phenomenon of bullying; however, studies on single incidences of sexual, physical, and psychological victimization at school remain scant. Therefore the aim of this study is to examine the phen... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The affective basis of violence - Mizen R.
Violence is a complex matter, and understandingly perhaps, it is the objective, behavioral aspects that are commonly focused on. Here, however, it is the subjective psychological and especially affective substrates of violence that are brought to the fore.... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

As You Age, Alcohol May Be Harder to Handle
FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 -- Seniors may be more vulnerable to alcoholism, a psychologist warns. " As we age, it takes longer for the body to break down alcohol. It stays in the system longer. Tolerance also decreases. Excessive drinking can compromise... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Would you deactivate Facebook for $1,000?
In a surprising new study, researchers reveal the value of Facebook. On average, users required around $1,000 to deactivate their account for 1 year. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychology / Psychiatry Source Type: news

Back to work blues? What we can learn from slackers
Our culture demonises those who don ’t work – but maybe it’s time we were more like Homer Simpson and Jeffrey ‘The Dude’ Lebowski, writes Josh CohenIn 1999, crowds of art lovers, many of them baffled, filed into London ’s Tate gallery to viewMy Bed, a work quickly established as one of the most iconic and notorious of our age. Tracey Emin ’s installation painstakingly recreated her bed as it appeared after an alcohol-fuelled breakdown, triggered by the end of a relationship. A disordered tangle of used and dirty stockings, towels and sheets, the undersheet spilling freely over the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Josh Cohen Tags: Books Health, mind and body books Culture Psychology Emily Dickinson Tracey Emin The Big Lebowski Ottessa Moshfegh Source Type: news

Pain as a Threat to the Social Self: A Motivational Account Pain as a Threat to the Social Self: A Motivational Account
The author presents a biopsychosocial model of pain, exploring the bidirectional relationship between interpersonal needs and pain and subsequent impact on physical and psychological health.Pain (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Obsessive compulsive symptoms in youth may be a red flag for other psychological issues
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Engaging in repetitive and ritualistic behaviors is part of typical child development. However, behaviors that develop into obsessive and compulsive symptoms may represent a red flag for serious psychiatric conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Book Review: Struggle Well: Thriving in the Aftermath of Trauma
Like me, you’ve probably seen people crumble and fail to recover from trauma (big or small) and you’ve also probably seen others who come through their experiences with clearer eyes, stronger spirits, straighter backs, and deeper wells of empathy and compassion. Perhaps they are even able to use their experiences in profoundly creative ways. The Japanese concept of kintsugi treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object rather than something to disguise. People can be proud of their scars, and some even transform them into memoir or service, or embellish them literally with tattoos and other ap...
Source: Psych Central - January 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lori Handelman, PhD Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Personal Stories Psychology PTSD Self-Help Trauma Treatment combat Falke Goldberg Struggle Well Therapy veteran Source Type: news

How a DNA Testing Kit Revealed a Family Secret Hidden for 54 Years
One evening in the winter of 2016, my husband mentioned that he was sending away for one of those commercial DNA-testing kits. He asked if I wanted him to order me one as well. I could easily have said no. I wasn’t curious about my ancestry. I knew where I came from–Eastern European Ashkenazi Jews on both my parents’ sides. Instead, I said yes. Why not? It seemed like a game–like those personality tests people often take online. The results, when I received them a few months later, changed everything I had ever understood about myself. I was only half Eastern European Ashkenazi, as it turned out. A ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dani Shapiro Tags: Uncategorized Viewpoint Source Type: news

Thousands of Women Are Born Without a Uterus. A New Procedure Offers Them Hope
On an afternoon in November, a couple hosted a birthday party for their 1-year-old son. As family and friends gathered around the child to sing “Happy Birthday,” his parents addressed a milestone that reached well beyond the room. “It was emotional,” recalls the mother. “It took a lot more than a nine-month pregnancy to get him, and we wouldn’t be where we are without everyone’s support.” Many parents will tell you their child is miraculous. But the mere existence of this particular boy, who just a month earlier had taken his first steps, brings the miracle somehow closer to ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

Thousands of Women Are Born Without a Uterus. A New Procedure Offers Them Hope
On an afternoon in November, a couple hosted a birthday party for their 1-year-old son. As family and friends gathered around the child to sing “Happy Birthday,” his parents addressed a milestone that reached well beyond the room. “It was emotional,” recalls the mother. “It took a lot more than a nine-month pregnancy to get him, and we wouldn’t be where we are without everyone’s support.” Many parents will tell you their child is miraculous. But the mere existence of this particular boy, who just a month earlier had taken his first steps, brings the miracle somehow closer to ...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

An Experimental Procedure Could Help More Families Have Healthy Babies. But It ’s Not Allowed in the U.S.
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

An Experimental Procedure Could Help More Families Have Healthy Babies. But It ’s Not Allowed in the U.S.
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

Childhood maltreatment, borderline personality features, and coping as predictors of intimate partner violence - Krause-Utz A, Mertens LJ, Renn JB, Lucke P, W öhlke AZ, van Schie CC, Mouthaan J.
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious mental and physical health concern worldwide. Although previous research suggests that childhood maltreatment increases the risk for IPV, the underlying psychological mechanisms of this relationship are not yet ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Subjective nearness-to-Death, filial obligations, and depressive symptoms: the case of Jews and Arabs in Israel - Bergman YS, Segel-Karpas D.
OBJECTIVES: Research has examined the link between subjective perceptions of life and death and psychological well-being. However, while cultural values were shown to provide a defense against death-related thoughts, little is known about specific cultural... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news