Vaccines for COVID-19 moving closer
As the world reels from illnesses and deaths due to COVID-19, the race is on for a safe, effective, long-lasting vaccine to help the body block the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The three vaccine approaches discussed here are among the first to be tested clinically in the United States. How vaccines induce immunity: The starting line In 1796, in a pastoral corner of England, and during a far more feudal and ethically less enlightened time, Edward Jenner, an English country surgeon, inoculated James Phipps, his gardener’s eight-year-old son, with cowpox pustules obtained from the arm of a milkmaid. It was widely belie...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shiv Pillai, PhD, MBBS Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Health Infectious diseases Vaccines Source Type: blogs

5 Role Models to Help Us Cope with the Pandemic
How do you dig deep to withstand the ongoing stress and requirements of life during a pandemic? Look to the role models: seniors. Seniors have a depth of experience confronting crises and using creative problem-solving skills that summon the higher instincts of the human spirit. They have experience showing up. They reached within to draw on character and integrity, and learned what it means to come through a recovery. From the Great Depression to World War II to 9/11, they did what was needed. Right now, they can be a fountain of hope.  There are countless examples of people who had to switch to plan B and not only s...
Source: World of Psychology - June 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BJ Kittredge Tags: Aging Self-Help coronavirus COVID-19 Elderly seniors Source Type: blogs

Covid-19 Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast with William Haseltine
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - May 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Covid-19 Reuters Q & A with William Haseltine
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - May 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Will This Novel Virus Revive Older Ones?
Jeffrey A. SingerAs I recently wrotehere, and spoke abouthere, bans on elective surgery invoked by governors across the country in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have caused many people to suffer and even possibly face fatal consequences due to delays in necessary medical care. But there are other reasons why the public health emergency has the potential to generate secondary public health crises.In some cases people are avoiding doctors ’ offices and emergency rooms because they worry about handling theexpense at a time they have seen their income, and perhaps their savings, vanish during the current ec...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 9, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

The Problem With “Herd Immunity” as a COVID-19 Strategy
This article originally appeared on his blog here. The post The Problem With “Herd Immunity” as a COVID-19 Strategy appeared first on The Health Care Blog. (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Dave deBronkart e-Patient Dave e-Patient Dave DeBronkart Pandemic Source Type: blogs

Leadership During a Healthcare Crisis: Kaiser Permanente ’s Response to COVID-19
A Conversation with Dr. Richard Isaacs, CEO of The Permanente Medical Group and the Mid Atlantic Permanente Medical Group By AJAY KOHLI, MD Organizations aren’t built in crises. Their mettle, their history and their leadership define how organizations adapt and succeed, particularly in difficult times. Of the three, the most important quality is leadership. In this regard, Kaiser Permanente is leading the way in healthcare delivery. I had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Richard Isaacs, CEO of The Permanente Medical Group and The MidAtlantic Permanente Medical Group, to discuss the strategic vision an...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Hospitals Medical Practice Ajay Kohli Kaiser Permanente Mid Atlantic Permanente Medical Group Pandemic Richard Isaacs Source Type: blogs

No Relationship Between Notifiable Diseases and Immigrant Populations
Alex Nowrasteh andAndrew C. ForresterThe international spread of the SARS ‐​CoV‐​2 virus that causes the disease COVID-19 has prompted many governments to close their borders. Immigration policy plays an important role in limiting the international spread of contagious diseases.Prior to the COVID-19 crisis,several commentators were concerned that immigrants – especially illegal immigrants – were spreading serious diseases in the United States. This blog post is the first in a series to answer the question of whether immigrants spread serious notifiable diseases other than COVID-19 in the ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 13, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh, Andrew C. Forrester Source Type: blogs

COVID-19: What can we learn from history?
I was quite young, but I could sense the unease in my mother when she first sent me off to elementary school amidst an uncertain risk of paralytic polio in the 1950 ’s era. She maintained her frightened countenance until 1960 when the Sabin vaccine miraculously appeared.  Many years later, my wife, a pediatrician, had intubated […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 6, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lawrence-hurwitz" rel="tag" > Lawrence Hurwitz, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Why follow a vaccine schedule?
Right now, many people are hoping for a vaccine to protect against the new coronavirus. While that’s still on the horizon, new research suggests that families who do vaccinate their children may not be following the recommended schedule. Vaccines are given on a schedule for a reason: to protect children from vaccine-preventable disease. Experts designed the schedule so that children get protection when they need it — and the doses are timed so the vaccine itself can have the best effect. When parents don’t follow the schedule, their children may not be protected. And yet, many parents do not follow the sc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs

Technology and Cooperation Help Fight the Pandemic
Chelsea FollettThe pandemic caused by the new coronavirus (COVID-19) from Wuhan, China, is now a serious and global problem. And that problem has been made even worse by a culture of constant alarmism making it hard to distinguish real threats from exaggerated claims, as the well ‐​known science writer Matt Ridley has pointed out. But even when faced with the genuine threat of a pandemic, there are reasons to take heart and think that humanity will rise to the challenges ahead.First, humanity has never been better prepared technologically to deal with a pandemic. We are fortunate to live in an age o...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 13, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Chelsea Follett Source Type: blogs

The real cost, and longer term implications, of the Wuhan coronavirus
It's too soon to know for sure how the tale of the novel coronavirus will play out,but at this point we have a pretty good idea. A stipulation in both of the scenarios at the linked essay is that yeah, it gets loose into the wild and eventually can show up anywhere in the world. I think that's pretty much definitely going to happen if it hasn't already.Scenario number 1, and most likely, in my view, it will just be one more virus that causes what amounts to a common cold and in a few people who are otherwise debilitated goes on to be complicated by pneumonia. In that case, for a year or two it will circulate as a novel vir...
Source: Stayin' Alive - February 5, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Wearable Iron Lung Helps COPD Patients Breathe Easier
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has few treatment options, with patients frequently experiencing shortness of breath. To address this most unwelcome symptom of COPD, Dr. Jake Brenner, a critical care physician specializing in pulmonology at Penn State’s Perelman School of Medicine, came up with an idea for a wearable device that may help. Resembling a bullet-proof vest, Dr. Brenner’s idea is based on the iron lungs that were common in the last century when polio still ravaged much of the world. The basic configuration consists of two shells that hug the patient’s chest and back, and a pump...
Source: Medgadget - December 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Source Type: blogs

Cool Images: A Colorful —and Halloween-Inspired—Collection
Transformations aren’t just for people or pets around Halloween. Scientific images also can look different than you might expect, depending on how they’re photographed. Check out these tricky-looking images and learn more about the science behind them. Credit: Nilay Taneja, Vanderbilt University, and Dylan T. Burnette, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Do you have a hunch about what this image is? Perhaps something to do with dry leaves? It’s a human fibroblast cell undergoing cell division, or cytokinesis, into two daughter cells. Cytokinesis is essential for the growth and...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - October 31, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Cells Biofilms Cellular Imaging Cool Images Source Type: blogs

Moving Mom with Cognitive Decline May Take Creative Thinking
Photo credit Sander Weeteling Dear Carol: My 84-year-old mother has been living in her own condominium but her problems with dementia are making this a scary situation. She forgets that she’s cooking and leaves the stove on and has left the water running for hours. She forgets what day it is and how to do basic self-care. Mom has physical problems, too, including damaged lungs and mobility and pain problems from post-polio syndrome. I talked her into in-home care twice in the past but when the caregivers came, she refused to let them in. I understand because I doubt that I’d like strangers coming in either, but...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 27, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Neurotropism of enterovirus D68 is not a recently acquired property
With Amy Rosenfeld Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) was first isolated from children with respiratory disease in 1962. No outbreaks of infection were detected until the late summer and early fall of 2014, and then in 2016 and 2018. During these epidemics of respiratory disease, some children developed polio-like paralysis. We have recently published a paper showing […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - October 24, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information acute flaccid myelitis astrocyte childhood paralysis enterovirus D68 neuron neurotropism poliovirus viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Wild poliovirus type 3 declared eradicated
Today, on World Polio Day, wild poliovirus type 3 has been declared eradicated by a commission of the World Health Organization. The last case of type 3 poliomyelitis was recorded in 2012 in Nigeria. As wild poliovirus type 2 was declared eraidcated in 2015, now only wild poliovirus type 1 continues to circulate, causing paralysis […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - October 24, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information IPV OPV polio eradication poliovirus type 2 poliovirus type 3 poliovirus vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

TWiV 570: Aarhus viral
At Aarhus University in Denmark, Vincent speaks with Trine Mogensen, Søren Paludan, Ole Søgaard, and Madalina Carter-Timofte about their careers and their work on sensing herpesviral DNA, immunodeficiencies that predispose to severe viral infections, and the path to a cure for HIV/AIDS. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 570 (61 MB .mp3, 101 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - October 20, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology Aarhus University AIDS AIDS cure cGAS DNA sensor herpes simplex virus HIV-1 HIV-1 latent reservoir host genetics polIII polio poliomyelitis poliovirus STING TLR9 varicella-zoster virus viral viruse Source Type: blogs

Polio returns to the Philippines
Cases of poliomyelitis have been reported in the Philippines 19 years after the country was declared free of the disease. The return of poliomyelitis to the country emphasizes the need to maintain high levels of immunization while polioviruses continue to circulate. The blame for the return of poliomyelitis is the drop in immunization rates to […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - September 27, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information eradication OPV Philippines poliomyelitis poliovirus type 2 poliovirus vaccine vaccine-associated poliovirus viral viruses Source Type: blogs

The rarity of paralysis following poliovirus infection
After infection with poliovirus, only about 1% of individuals develop paralysis. I have always wondered whether genetic polymorphisms underlie the rarity of this disease outcome. The results of study carried out in Denmark provide the first insights. The study group consisted of 17 individuals who developed poliomyelitis in the pre-vaccine years, 1940-1950, and one who […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - September 11, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information genetic susceptibility paralysis poliomyelitis poliovirus single nucleotide polymorphism SNIP viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Why do parents worry about vaccines?
We are in the midst of a measles epidemic. As of July 25th, more than 1,100 cases have been reported in 30 states since the beginning of the year. That’s the highest number since 1992 — and since measles was declared eliminated in 2000. Given that measles is extremely contagious — the virus can linger in rooms even after a sick person has left — and can lead to serious complications, this is really alarming. There is a simple way to help: get more people immunized. How many children receive vaccines? Most children in the US are immunized. Only a little more than 1% of children have no immunizations....
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs

TWiV 553: Polio with David Oshinsky
Vincent speaks with David Oshinsky, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Polio: An American Story, about the history of poliovirus vaccines. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 553 (40 MB .mp3, 66 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 25, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology Source Type: blogs

Why Measles Making the News Is a Sign of Progress
A set of  measles outbreaks in Washington state, New York City, and elsewhere, is making national headlines and frightening parents around the United States. Counter-intuitively, measles making the news is a sign of progress. Not long ago, measles was so common that it was simply not newsworthy. Suffer ing from the extremely infectious disease, which causes spotty rashes and a hacking cough, was widespread and often deadly.It was once the case that even royalty fell victim to diseases now easily preventable with routine shots given during childhood.  Measles killed the un-vaccin...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 15, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chelsea Follett Source Type: blogs

Autism Is But One Part of a Complex Personality Structure
April is Autism Awareness Month. To review: Autism is one of the five pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) listed in the DSM 5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual) which provides diagnostic guidelines for mental health professionals. Autism is characterized by difficulties in social interactions, a narrow and particular range of interests and repetitive behaviors. Although it is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, research has yet to identify the differences in the brain that determine what makes people with autism different from the norm. Since the combination of attributes can b...
Source: World of Psychology - April 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Aspergers Autism Communication anti-vaccination Asperger Syndrome Autism Awareness Month Autism Spectrum Disability polio Stereotypes Stigma Source Type: blogs

Pediatric Conjunctivitis a Simple Diagnosis Until It Isn’t
​Conjunctivitis is a common condition and easy enough to treat, but several uncommon conjunctivitis syndromes require more care and should not be missed.Conjunctivitis is either infectious (viral or bacterial) or noninfectious (allergic or nonallergic). Viral infections are more common in adults, bacterial ones in children, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Adults tend to have more S. aureus infections, while the other pathogens are more common in children. An adenovirus is typically responsible for viral-associated infections in conjunct...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - March 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The Far Right Goes Anti-Vax
A phenomenon which has always puzzled me is popular resistance to vaccination. It goes back to the very beginning, vaccination against smallpox, which was a terrible scourge that killed 30% of its victims and left the rest disfigured. When Edward Jenner proved in 1796 that inoculation with cowpox, which caused only mild disease, conferred immunity to smallpox, the world was given a priceless gift.Yet popular movements arose almost immediately to oppose vaccination, both in England and the U.S. Eventually smallpox vaccination became widely accepted, and smallpox was eradicated from the earth. Later, the terror of the polio ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - December 21, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

What you need to know about acute flaccid myelitis
You ’ve probably seen it on the news – a rare, polio-like illness is causing cases of paralysis in children. Here’s the latest info, based on our best current knowledge from the CDC. Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a sudden illness that causes weakness in one or more extremities – one arm or (le ss likely) a […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/roy-benaroch" rel="tag" > Roy Benaroch, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Neurology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

From Russia with Money - Harvard Medical School Accepts $200 Million from Russian Emigre with Ties to Russian Oligarchs and Putin, and Who Is Under Investigation for US Election Meddling
We present a big case of what looks like an entirely new, and very troubling variation on an institutional conflict of interest.A " Transformative " Gift to Harvard Medical SchoolOn November 8, 2018, Felice Freyer, writingin the Boston Globe, documented a huge new gift to Harvard Medical School.Harvard Medical School has received a $200 million donation— the largest in its history — to support research into fundamental questions about human illness and health.The pledge,from the Blavatnik Family Foundation, will enable the school to hire researchers, add to its advanced technology, and a build an'incu...
Source: Health Care Renewal - November 18, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: conflicts of interest crime Donald Trump Harvard Harvard Medical School institutional conflicts of interest oligarchy revolving doors Russia Source Type: blogs

AFM: The scary polio-like illness
It is a scary illness, not just for parents but for doctors, too: Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) causes sudden weakness and loss of muscle tone in the arms and legs and can go on to cause even more serious problems. It’s not just the symptoms that are scary. It’s also scary because we don’t know what causes it. Although the symptoms are similar to polio, patients with AFM have tested negative for polio. At one point it was thought that it was caused by another enterovirus, but that didn’t end up being the explanation. It may be another virus, or it may be some sort of toxin, or something else entirely...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Neurological conditions Parenting Source Type: blogs

The Migrant Caravan, Central America, and Vaccination Rates
Many commentators have recentlywritten andsaid that members of the migrant caravan and Central American immigrants in general are diseased.   Former Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent David Ward claimed that the migrants are “coming in with diseases such as smallpox,” a disease that the World Health Organization (WHO) certified as beingeradicated in 1980.   One hopes Mr. Ward was more careful in enforcing American immigration law than in spreading rumors that migrants are carrying one of the deadliest diseases in human history nearly 40 years after it was eradicated from the human population.&n...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 1, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Remembering the age of polio
“Polio. I’ve seen polio.” Last night, I was speaking with one of the most experienced pediatricians I’ve ever met, Dr. Jack Burstiner. I’ve known him for 50 years. I would have known him even longer if I had been born earlier. He lived in my neighborhood, two doors down. He was my pediatrician. Jack is almost 90 years old. But he still looks like a pediatrician. He’s got a smile a child could trust, now hidden under a white mustache. His green eyes twinkle when he talks about his patients, the kids he’s seen. There are some things about a pediatrician that never change. Though he s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/roy-benaroch" rel="tag" > Roy Benaroch, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Infectious Disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

TWiV 504: Flying foxes and barking pigs
The TWiVerinos discuss Nipah virus and the recent outbreak in India, and the first cast of polio in Papua New Guinea in 18 years. &lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&amp;lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&amp;gt;&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;amp;lt;span […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 29, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology date palm sap henipavirus Nipah virus outbreak Papua New Guinea poliovirus Smithsonian Institution vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Is There a Kind of Severe Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease?
Hand-foot-mouth disease can be caused by any of several related viruses, most commonly by one called coxsackievirus A-16. In 2008, an epidemic of one type of severe hand-foot-mouth disease (also known as HFMD) in China appeared in news reports around the world as the child-killing virus. More than forty people died in that outbreak; all of them children. The culprit was enterovirus 71, or EV-71. In 2011 another new cause of HFMD hit the United States, coxsackievirus A-6. People feel sicker with this one than typical HFMD; the rash is worse; it lasts longer; and they may temporarily lose their nails. One clue to t...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - July 27, 2018 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Diseases & Conditions Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Is There a Kind of Severe Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease?
Hand-foot-mouth disease can be caused by any of several related viruses, most commonly by one called coxsackievirus A-16. In 2008, an epidemic of one type of severe hand-foot-mouth disease (also known as HFMD) in China appeared in news reports around the world as the child-killing virus. More than forty people died in that outbreak; all of them children. The culprit was enterovirus 71, or EV-71. In 2011 another new cause of HFMD hit the United States, coxsackievirus A-6. People feel sicker with this one than typical HFMD; the rash is worse; it lasts longer; and they may temporarily lose their nails. One clue to t...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - July 27, 2018 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Diseases & Conditions Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Vaccine opponents think they know more than medical experts. Why is that?
One of the most contentious areas of health policy over the past two decades has been the safety of vaccination. Vaccines prevent the outbreak of diseases that used to be widespread, like polio, and scientific consensus strongly supports their safety. Yet many Americans refuse or delay the vaccination of their children out of fear that it could lead to autism, even though scientific consensus refutes this claim. Anti-vaccine attitudes have been fueled in large part by growing rates of autism diagnoses as well as a now debunked study in The Lancet that linked autism and the measles mumps rubella (MMR) vaccine – pushin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/matthew-motta-steven-sylvester-timothy-callaghan" rel="tag" > Matthew Motta, PhD, Steven Sylvester, PhD, and Timothy Callaghan, PhD < /a > Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Papua New Guinea is no longer polio-free
Last week we discussed the case of polio in Venezuela that turned out not to be polio. Unfortunately the same cannot be concluded about a bona fide case of polio in Papua New Guinea. Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) revealed a 6 year old boy in Papua New Guinea with lower limb weakness on […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 28, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information cVDPV OPV Papua New Guinea poliovirus Sabin vaccine reversion viral viruses vrus Source Type: blogs

Venezuela is still polio-free
In early June it was widely reported that the first case of poliomyelitis in 30 years had been identified in Venezuela (see this Tech Times report as an example). Fortunately these reports were incorrect, and Venezuela remains free of polio. Let’s unpack exactly what happened. In early June the Pan-American Health Organization reported that on […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 21, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information acute flaccid paralysis AFP OPV poliovirus Sabin vaccine vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis vaccine-derived poliovirus vapp VDPV Venezuela viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Trump ’s Docs
BySTEVEN FINDLAY It’s now clear that two public assessments of President Trump’s health since 2015—the only ones we know about—were seriously compromised.    The import of this has been eclipsed by other (more salacious) recent events—Stormy Daniels, etc.   But what has transpired raises troubling questions and should prompt a reassessment of how candidates for president and presidents are medically evaluated, and the public’s right to that information.      I’ve written two pieces for THCB on Trump’s physical and mental health.  You can fin...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

3 ways to help get more children immunized
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire There is much to celebrate during National Infant Immunization Week this year. More than 90% of children 19 to 35 months have received all the recommended doses of vaccines for their age against polio, measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, and hepatitis B — and more than 80% have received all the recommended protection against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, pneumococcus, and Haemophilus influenzae. But there are also reasons to be concerned. Only 72% have had all the recommended vaccines, which means one in four children is missing at least one. Even more concerning, studies show that ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs

I believe in vaccinations. And do my kids know it.
When preparations are underway for vaccinations to take place, my household becomes a war zone. The thought of an impending vaccine, to my boys, resembles the actual possibility of a weapons attack. It is, in essence, a weapon. It’s a needle that comes your way and invades the comfort of your normally undisturbed skin surface. But it also serves a purpose — much like the police department does — to protect and serve. It arms your body against any future attack. It revs up your immune system and prepares its antibody soldiers, so they’re ready when the threat becomes real. It has helped us to practic...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/dana-corriel" rel="tag" > Dana Corriel, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Vaccinations: More than just kid stuff
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs

DDT and the Polio Fallout
There’s always a member of your family who you truly love. Who you wish you could spend more time with, and who treated you with so much love in return that you just couldn’t get enough of them. That was my Aunt Gerry. When I was a small guy growing up in Lansing, Michigan, she […] VacTruth.com (Source: vactruth.com)
Source: vactruth.com - February 2, 2018 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Eric Durak Tags: Injuries & Deaths DDT Polio truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs

The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President
BY STEVEN FINDLAY The resurgent debate about President Trump’s mental health prompts me to update a piece I wrote for THCB last June. That piece drew lively comments and debate. It’s also the one-year mark of the Trump presidency. As The New York Times editorial page recently asked, bluntly, on Jan. 11: “Is Mr. Trump Nuts?” Since last summer, that question has gained more traction and spurred more earnest debate. The results from Trump’s medical and “cognitive” exam on Jan 12 are unlikely to quell concern.   (More about those results below.) Nearly every major newspaper ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized APA Bandy X. Lee Steven Findlay The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump Source Type: blogs

Assessing a President ’ s Mental Health
Just as the President of the United States undergoes an annual checkup and physical every year, it makes sense that they should undergo an annual checkup for their mental health too. Since mental health is of equal importance to one’s physical health, it makes little sense to ignore it and pretend it’s not important. Or worse, to act as though a person’s mental health either doesn’t exist or can’t be objectively measured. It’s time for the President to undergo annual mental health checkups, coinciding with their physical exams. It goes without saying that most actual smart people don&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Psychology Donald Trump fitness for office litmus test mental exam Mental Fitness president's fitness president's mental health should we Source Type: blogs

A New Non-Partisan Panel to Monitor the President ’ s Medical Record
By ART CAPLAN & JONATHAN MORENO The White House has announced that President Trump has scheduled an annual physical exam for Jan. 12. The President will go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., the largest military hospital in the nation. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Dr. Ronny Jackson, a rear admiral in the U.S. Navy who has served as physician to the President since 2013, “will give a readout of the exam after it’s completed.” Some may have greeted this announcement with relief. Finally, concerns about the President’s slurred speech, o...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A New Non-Partisan Panel to Monitor the President ’ s Health
By ART CAPLAN & JONATHAN MORENO The White House has announced that President Trump has scheduled an annual physical exam for Jan. 12. The President will go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., the largest military hospital in the nation. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Dr. Ronny Jackson, a rear admiral in the U.S. Navy who has served as physician to the President since 2013, “will give a readout of the exam after it’s completed.” Some may have greeted this announcement with relief. Finally, concerns about the President’s slurred speech, o...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 27th 2017
We examined associations between mortality and accelerometer-measured PA using age-relevant intensity cutpoints in older women of various ethnicities. The results support the hypothesis that higher levels of accelerometer-measured PA, even when below the moderate-intensity threshold recommended in current guidelines, are associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality in women aged 63 to 99. Our findings expand on previous studies showing that higher self-reported PA reduces mortality in adults aged 60 and older, specifically in older women, and at less than recommended amounts. Moreover, our findings challenge th...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

James Peyer at TEDxStuttgart: Can We Defeat the Diseases of Aging?
My attention was drawn today to a recently published presentation by James Peyer. He heads up Apollo Ventures, one of the new crop of investment concerns focused on funding companies that are developing means to treat aging. These include the Longevity Fund, first out of the gate some years ago, as well as Juvenescence and the Methuselah Fund, created this year, and a repurposing of existing funds, such as Michael Greve's Kizoo ventures. Apollo Ventures is the source of the Geroscience online magazine that helps to advance and explain the position taken on aging by this group; this is something that more investors should d...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Puts The Place Of Technology In Health Care In A Larger Perspective.
This appeared last week:How The Rise Of Medical Technology Is Worsening DeathJessica Nutik Zitter November 6, 2017 10.1377/hblog20171101.612681 Our aging population is at risk from a most benign-appearing source —the medical technologies we trust to keep us healthy.When they were first widely used in the 1930s and 1940s, breathing machines did what humans could never have imagined a generation earlier: They kept young polio victims alive until their bodies cleared the virus that had temporarily weakened t heir respiratory system. Thanks to these miraculous machines, tens of thousands of these patients recovered and ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - November 15, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs