Should Podiatrists Be Provided With Full Access To A Patient's #myHealthRecord?
This popped up last week:WEBINAR - My Health Record: Revolutionising The Way We Consult How often have you wasted time chasing clinical information about your patients or spending precious minutes in consult paper pushing? The My Health Record is here to ease your load and free up your time to focus on doing what you do best – providing exceptional patient care and delivering positive patient outcomes.This webinar will provide you with all the information you need to gain the maximum benefit out of My Health Record to enhance shared clinical and patient centred care and integrate the My Health Record system into your...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - January 3, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Nope, “provider” still doesn’t work
In November of 2015, Dr. Suneel Dhand and William J. Carbone penned, “Physicians are not providers: An Open Letter to the AMA (American Medical Association) and medical boards.” The authors ended their piece with the following plea: “The word “provider” is a non-specific and nondescript term that confers little meaning. We, therefore, call on the American Medical Association and all state medical boards to consider discouraging and terminating the use of the word “provider.” In Dr. Dhand’s follow up piece, he waves a white flag, as he recounts a conversation with a young resi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jennifer-weiss" rel="tag" > Jennifer Weiss, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 503
This week's case is a fun identification from Florida Fan. A podiatrist submitted a toe nail sample from an elderly female for fungal smear and culture. Fungus wasn't seen using KOH Calcofluor staining, but instead something else was noted:Identification? And any thought on what it's doing on a toe? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 24, 2018 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Trust, but...
I have been seeing Xinren for several months, on and off, in a primary care fashion.  That is a frustrating interaction pattern from an occupational therapy perspective, and perhaps one that as a profession we are simply not acculturated to.  In traditional contexts occupational therapists see children on an ongoing and regular basis.  Xinren's family would call and then would be seen for a consult and recommendations were made and then they seemed to not follow up for some time.The family initiated contact with me because they were concerned about their child's gross motor skills. The initial evaluation ind...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - June 16, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Tags: OT practice OT stories parenting Source Type: blogs

Another Case for Taking the Second Amendment Seriously
Over a decade ago, Rickey Kanter ’s company, Dr. Comfort, shipped diabetic shoe inserts to a podiatrist in Florida. Dr. Comfort sold the inserts as being Medicare-approved, but they were not. Because of these events, Kanter, to this day, cannot legally own a gun.U.S. and Wisconsin law prohibit anyone convicted of a crime “punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year” from possessing any firearm or ammunition. In 2011, Kanter pled guilty to a single count of mail fraud for Dr. Comfort’s 2006 delivery of non-compliant shoe inserts to a podiatrist. Kanter has no other criminal convictions, ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 9, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ilya Shapiro, Matthew Larosiere Source Type: blogs

From “Grazers” to “Continual Bathers”—Practical Approaches to Meet Hygiene Needs of People With Late Stage Dementia
In a previous post, I outlined the concept behind my Grazers Program for clients with dementia. Grazers sets the framework for a collaborative facility approach to managing deficits in attention and wandering behavior common for people with late-stage dementia. These behaviors can lead to unintentional weight loss and compromised nutritional status, so I came up with Grazers to meet those patients where they are with healthy snacks. If speech-language pathologists can teach caregivers ways to successfully engage people with late-stage dementia and increase their nutritional opportunities throughout the day, why can’t...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - March 5, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Robert Maxwell Tags: Speech-Language Pathology dementia Health Care skilled nursing facility Source Type: blogs

Hologic ’s New Fluoroscan InSight FD Mini C-Arm for Extremity Scans
Hologic just launched its new Fluoroscan InSight FD Mini C-Arm, an extremities imaging system intended for specialists such as orthopedists and podiatrists. The user can select between high resolution or low dosage modes, varying between patients as needed. The low-dose mode can produce images with up to half the radiation compared the machine’s automatic setting. The quality of the images can still rival the fully automatic mode. Choosing the high resolution setting enables the full use of the system’s detector to achieve the best image possible. The device features a 24-inch touchscreen, that can be used...
Source: Medgadget - January 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Orthopedic Surgery Plastic Surgery Radiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Until I Drop
Every day that I go out the door (which is not everyday), I go until I drop or that is what it feels like.Yesterday is an example: three doctor appointments at two different places 45 minutes apart, two stops at stores, one stop at my parents for 15 minutes, and then home. I was so tired by the time I got home, I was barely standing. I took the easy way out and got in bed for the next two hours.At my last stop, at the podiatrist that I have been going to since last summer, I ran into a friend who worked there. I knew she worked in a medical office but I didn't know she worked in that one. She only works two days a week whi...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fatigue fibromyalgia naps rheumatoid arthritis tired Source Type: blogs

New Jersey Finalizes “Gift” Ban of Physicians Working with the Pharmaceutical Industry
Conclusion Companies have until January 15, 2018, to enter into any contracts with New Jersey Health Care providers that may exceed the $10,000 total cap for promotional speaking and consulting payments. Unfortunately, these types of rules often work against their stated purpose which is to fight the “Opioid Crisis” our review of the open payments database showed a modest use of payments to physicians by opioid companies in New Jersey. Rather than consulting with companies to determine the optimal use for their products, NJ physicians will have to pay close attention to their payments or find outside work in ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - January 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Senators Blumenthal and Grassley Ask CMS to Continue Funding Open Payments
In a letter to Acting Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Eric D. Hargan, United States Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) and Chuck Grassley (R-IA) ask HHS to prioritize funding for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Center for Program Integrity (CPI), a program that enhances transparency in transactions between medical providers and pharmaceutical companies. The CPI’s Open Payments database, created under the bipartisan Physician Payments Sunshine Act, mandates disclosure of billions of dollars in payments from manufacturers to prescribers and hospitals. This is of...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 9, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

New Jersey Holds Public Meeting on Proposed Regulation
Pictured from left to right: Sharon M. Joyce, Acting Director, Division of Consumer Affairs; Christopher S. Porrino, Attorney General of New Jersey; Maryann Sheehan, Director of Legislative and Regulatory Affairs, Division of Consumer Affairs; Rachel D. Glasgow, Regulatory Analyst “It is our intent to move forward with these rules.” Attorney General, Christopher S. Porrino Last Wednesday, the New Jersey Office of Attorney General, Division of Consumer Affairs, Department of Law and Public Safety, held a public hearing regarding the state’s proposed regulation, “Limitations on and Obligations Assoc...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 23, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

New Jersey " Gift " Ban Next Step - Public Hearing on Limitations on and Obligations Associated with Acceptance of Compensation from Pharmaceutical Manufacturers by Prescribers
Pictured from left to right: Sharon M. Joyce, Acting Director, Division of Consumer Affairs; Christopher S. Porrino, Attorney General of New Jersey; Maryann Sheehan, Director of Legislative and Regulatory Affairs, Division of Consumer Affairs; Rachel D. Glasgow, Regulatory Analyst “It is our intent to move forward with these rules.” Attorney General, Christopher S. Porrino Last Wednesday, the New Jersey Office of Attorney General, Division of Consumer Affairs, Department of Law and Public Safety, held a public hearing regarding the state’s proposed regulation, “Limitations on and Obligations Assoc...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 23, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

The sad direction of hospital care
My 74-year old obese, poorly controlled diabetic patient with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, coronary artery disease, asthma, obstructive sleep apnea has been difficult to motivate to improve his lifestyle and his health. He is bright, sweet and caring but just not very disciplined. At each office visit, we review his medications, review his dietary habits and go through the check list of check-ups for diabetic complications including regular ophthalmology exams and podiatric exams to prevent diabetic retinopathy and foot skin breakdown and infection. His spouse is always present, and we discuss seeing his endocrin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/steven-reznick" rel="tag" > Steven Reznick, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Diabetes Emergency Hospital Hospitalist Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Podimetrics System Helps Prevent Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Interview
Podimetrics is a company that has developed a special foot temperature monitoring pad that can keep track of a diabetic’s feet to help detect the onset of foot ulcers. The Podimetrics Mat and the rest of the company’s Remote Temperature Monitoring System allow clinicians to receive high resolution temperature scans of the soles of their patients’ feet while giving patients the convenience of doing daily tests in the convenience of the home. We spoke with Dr. Jon Bloom, CEO and Co-Founder of Podimetrics about the company’s technology and how it can help manage diabetic feet and reduce the incidence o...
Source: Medgadget - July 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs

CMS Releases 2016 Open Payment Data
Conclusion Visitors to the CMS Open Payments website can look up individual clinicians and hospitals to see what they have received from drug and device makers and compare their payments to national and specialty averages.       Related StoriesOpen Payments Starts Review and Dispute…On A SaturdayChicago Releases Pharmaceutical Representative Disclosure Log DraftCalifornia Gift Ban Bill to be Heard Tomorrow  (Source: Policy and Medicine)
Source: Policy and Medicine - July 3, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

CMS Releases 2016 Open Payments Data
Conclusion Visitors to the CMS Open Payments website can look up individual clinicians and hospitals to see what they have received from drug and device makers and compare their payments to national and specialty averages.       Related StoriesOpen Payments Starts Review and Dispute…On A SaturdayChicago Releases Pharmaceutical Representative Disclosure Log DraftCalifornia Gift Ban Bill to be Heard Tomorrow  (Source: Policy and Medicine)
Source: Policy and Medicine - July 3, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Outbreaks of Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Infection in the United States
To date, 114 known outbreaks of human infection by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been associated with medical / other invasive procedures.  37 of these (32%) have reported from the United States.  The following chronology is abstracted from the Gideon e-book series. [1]   Primary references are available from the author.  1987     17 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae otitis media in Louisiana caused by contaminated water used by an ENT practice  1988    8 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection associated with a contaminated jet injector used in a Podiatry of...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: General Source Type: blogs

If You Think The myHR is Safe and Secure Think Again. There Are Some Weaknesses.
This appeared late last week.Your private health information is online and you don ’t even know itSue Dunlevy, National Health Reporter, News Corp Australia NetworkMay 5, 2017 10:00pmIT’S the $2 billion online health record you don’t even know you have and it could be putting your health privacy at risk.Millions of Australians are unaware they have an online My Health Record set up by the government that can reveal if they have a mental illness, sexually transmitted disease, an abortion or other embarrassing health problem.It can be accessed by 650,000 health professionals including dentists, dietitians, ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - May 12, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Home remedies that may be worth a try
Harvard Medical School embraces evidence-based medicine — treatments that have been shown to be effective through high-quality studies called randomized controlled clinical trials. So it’s always a little surprising when a Harvard doctor proposes a home remedy, as Dr. James P. Ioli did in an interview about toenail fungus. Dr. Ioli, who is chief of the podiatry service at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, suggested that daily applications of Vicks VapoRub might be at least as effective as most of the topical treatments for toenail fungus that are available by prescription or over the counte...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Beverly Merz Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Health Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

High Heels: WTF, Ladies?
image:maxpixelBy Crabby McSlackerThere are some ways in which I definitely have a girl brain, not a boy brain. But in other ways, I am a dude. I sometimes find my own gender to be an alien species, incomprehensible in its motivations and reasoning and habits. (For a more complete elucidation of my cluelessness about female behavior, I wrote a much longer post years ago aboutWomen and the Quest for Beauty. Like so many ancient Cranky Fitness posts, it lingers undisturbed in the archives, gathering dust and long forgotten, yet it's better than the stuff I write now. Which makes me a little sad. Though not sad ...
Source: Cranky Fitness - March 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Crabby McSlacker Source Type: blogs

Advanced BioHealing (Shire) Settlement Largest in Medical Device History
Earlier this month, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that Shire Pharmaceuticals LLC and other subsidiaries of Shire plc will pay $350 million to settle federal and state False Claims Act (FCA) allegations that Shire and Advanced BioHealing (ABH) – a company Shire acquired in 2011 – employed kickbacks and other unlawful methods to induce clinics and physicians to use or overuse its product Dermagraft, a bioengineered human skin substitute approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. The DOJ initiated both civil and criminal investigations in June 2011, w...
Source: Policy and Medicine - January 26, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Open Payments Discussed at MedPAC November Meeting
The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission meets publicly in Washington, D.C. to discuss various Medicare issues and policy questions, as well as to develop and approve reports and recommendations to Congress. During the November public meeting, Ariel Winter and Amy Phillips discussed, “Payments from drug and device manufacturers to physicians and teaching hospitals, 2015.” Ms. Winter and Ms. Phillips discussed the background and description of the Open Payments (public reporting) program, results of their analysis of 2015 data from Open Payments, as well as possible future changes to Open Payments. Background ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 20, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

New Jersey Interactive “Transparency” Map
NJ Spotlight, a website that highlights “news issues and insight for New Jersey” recently created an interactive map of New Jersey doctors who received transfers of value from industry in 2015. The map, which can be found here, allows interested readers to see payments by zip code and details on those doctors who received the most money on the map, in addition to individual payments to doctors by searching the databases that are arranged by last names. According to the United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), New Jersey doctors and hospitals received nearly $59 million last year from dru...
Source: Policy and Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Just-in-Time Healthcare Information
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD One of the things that can cause physician burnout is the arcane way information flows in medical offices. In essence, due to EMRs we are the recipients of increasing amounts of unfiltered data without context. Pre-EMR, team members sorted incoming data, which allowed us to deal with it more efficiently. We would have piles of things that needed a signature just as a formality, other piles for normal reports, smaller piles for abnormal reports, or whatever system worked best for us and our practices. Because EMRs were created by people who never imagined that doctors themselves knew anything about how ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Medicare Access and Chip Reauthorization Act (MACRA) Proposed Rule, MIPS, APM’s and Advanced Care Information
Discussion Welcome news is the elimination of the all or nothing criteria of the meaningful use program. The exclusion of most ACO's under Medicare shared shavings is probably the most controversial part of the proposed rule as health systems have invested millions in the current Medicare shared savings program. That CMS is estimating that 87% of solo practitioners will be paying a penalty will also not be well received. Under MIPS CMS is estimating that non MD providers with the exception of nurse practitioners and physician assistants fare the worst including Chiropractors, Podiatrists and Dentists. Overall the propose...
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 28, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

CMS Update Call on Open Payments
Recently, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) held a National Provider Call on Open Payments: Program Overview and Prepare to Review Reported Data. Robin Usi and Erin Skinner took turns educating participants how to identify the parts of the review, dispute, and correction process and how to take appropriate actions in the Open Payments system. What is Reported? As a reminder, any direct or indirect payments, or other transfers of value, that are made to covered recipients (i.e., physicians, teaching hospitals, physician owners, investors). Certain ownership or investment interests that are held by p...
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 19, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Super Docs 2.0
Guest post by Tane Eunson – A student of the game (6th year M.B.B.S.) As the plane descended over the Southern Alps and through the Canterbury Plains, making it’s way east to the Pacific Ocean like the Waimakariri, I couldn’t help but feel excited to be returning home. Home being the shaky isles of New Zealand and my six-week medical elective being in the particularly shaky city of Christchurch. The Waimakariri River, Canterbury, NZ. December 10th, 2015 Although Perth has been my new home since 2007, I spent the four years prior to that gaining my undergraduate degree in Christchurch; four years which I l...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 15, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Sports Medicine crusaders Dr Deb Robinson elective rugby Tane Eunson Waimakariri Waimumu Wiremu Source Type: blogs

Hitting the Slopes
A man hobbled into the emergency department complaining of continued ankle pain and increased swelling after falling from a ladder the day before. Ankle images were ordered. The mortis, syndesmosis, and malleoli appeared normal, but the massive medial soft tissue motivated a continued search. Was there something wrong with the lateral talus?The subsequent CT scan delineated a comminuted fracture of the talar lateral process extending to the subtalar joint — a snowboarder's fracture.Fractures of the lateral process of the talus are relatively uncommon, frequently missed, and can end up with long-term disability. It ha...
Source: Lions and Tigers and Bears - April 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound: Foreign Body Removal
Part 2 in a SeriesAre you ready for summer? That means more bare feet, flip-flops, and the potential for foreign bodies of the foot and toe. We will continue to highlight tools and tricks to help you master soft tissue foreign body removal in the emergency department. A refresher on the basics of ultrasound is available in our blog post from last month: http://emn.online/1UGtduz.Foreign bodies of the toe or foot are common presentations in emergency departments, and one way to determine the size and shape of retained superficial foreign bodies is to use ultrasound and the linear probe. This simple technique may help you lo...
Source: The Procedural Pause - April 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Web First: Wide Differences In Rural Health Information Technology Adoption
This study, part of the journal’s DataWatch series, will also appear in the February issue of Health Affairs. (Source: Health Affairs Blog)
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 20, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Lucy Larner Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Health IT EHRs electronic health records rural health Web First Source Type: blogs

Should Fluoro be Your New Go-To?
Part Three in a Three-Part Series   This is the third and final part of our series on foreign bodies and fluoroscopy. Click here for part one and here for part two.   This month, we walk you through a step-by-step guide with bonus video footage to aid in your technique. This progressive procedure is absolutely significant to your practice, and we hope you all get a chance to try it.     The Approach n        Identification of foreign body on plain film or ultrasound n         Saphenous or posterior tibial nerve block...
Source: The Procedural Pause - January 4, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

" Pimping " : Not About Sex-- About Medical Education "
The objective of pimping is to teach, motivate, and involve the learner in clinical rounds while maintaining a dominant hierarchy and cultivating humility by ridding the learner of egotism. " So what we must decide is whether this " pimping " is an effective and benign form of Socratic teaching or in most cases really a form of medical student " mistreatment " To learn more about " pimping " in medical education, read this outline of the practice in &nbsp; eTalk . The cartoon also brings up another issue as to whether " pimping " medical stud...
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - December 14, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs

November blogs digest: Cas9, Angelina Jolie, diabetes, and more
Extending the study of evidence-based medicine Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an approach to medical practice intended to enhance decision making, recognizing that only the strongest study types can yield strong recommendations. Many people owe their lives to evidence-based medicine, benefitting from trials and observational studies that have informed early diagnosis and effective treatments. But the indisputable successes are no cause for complacency, and Trish Greenhalgh, Professor of Primary Care Health Sciences at University of Oxford, explained more. Cas9: one protein to rule them all We hail CRISPR/Cas as the most ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - December 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Sophie Marchant Tags: Biology Health Medicine blogs digest genomics Source Type: blogs

Should Fluoro Be Your Go-to?
Part One in a Three-Part Series   How many times have you wasted at least 30 minutes (if not more) digging around in a patient’s foot to remove a sewing needle or piece of metal or glass? Or maybe the question is, how many of you have immediately referred the patient to podiatry because foreign body removal isn’t an ED procedure?   Foreign body removal may not be emergent, but it can be urgent. Items left in the skin can cause complications and should be removed whenever possible to decrease risk of infection or other future issues.   Foreign body of the left foot in a 56-year-old woman.   ...
Source: The Procedural Pause - November 2, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Should Fluoro Be Your Go-to?
Part One in a Three-Part Series   How many times have you wasted at least 30 minutes (if not more) digging around in a patient’s foot to remove a sewing needle or piece of metal or glass? Or maybe the question is, how many of you have immediately referred the patient to podiatry because foreign body removal isn’t an ED procedure?   Foreign body removal may not be emergent, but it can be urgent. Items left in the skin can cause complications and should be removed whenever possible to decrease risk of infection or other future issues.   Foreign body of the left foot in a 56-year-old woman. ...
Source: The Procedural Pause - November 2, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Provider Payment Sunshine Act: Senators Grassley and Blumenthal Introduce Bill to Expand Open Payments Reporting Requirements to Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants
On October 7, Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) and Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn) introduced a bill that would expand the Open Payments reporting requirements to include nurse practitioners and physician assistants. Currently, to comply with the Sunshine Act, pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers are required to report payments and other transfers of value to physicians and teachings hospitals. While the definition of physician is broad—and includes doctors of medicine, osteopathy, dentists, podiatrists, optometrists and chiropractors who legally authorized to practice by a state—the law currently doe...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 9, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Policy and Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Don’t Repeal the “Cadillac Tax” On High Cost Health Plans
Since the beginnings of employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI), employer contributions have been excluded from both income and payroll taxes, without limit (“the exclusion”). The Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) so-called “Cadillac Tax”—a nickname chosen to suggest luxury and extravagance—is a 40 percent excise tax on the insurer on the excess of aggregate cost of coverage over $10,200 per individual and $27,500 per family in 2018. The Cadillac Tax was intended to help correct some of the perverse incentives created by the exclusion, as well as to help pay for subsidies for health in...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 5, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Alain Enthoven Tags: Costs and Spending Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Payment Policy Alain Enthoven Cadillac tax Employer-Sponsored Insurance Health Policy premiums Source Type: blogs

General Guidelines Related to Abscess Incision and Drainage: Part II
Greetings! We’re excited to continue our series on abscess incision and drainage. This procedure should be loved and adored, because another abscess is waiting just behind the curtain. This month we will highlight (in video format) the final cut of abscess incision and drainage. We will follow up with some additional videos in the months to follow focusing on scalp, vaginal, and facial abscesses. And, just when you think you have seen it all, we will reveal a few more surprises.     The Approach ·         Identification of an abscess appropriate for I&D ...
Source: The Procedural Pause - March 31, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Pearls for Abscess Incision and Drainage
Part 2 in a Series Abscess incision and drainage should be loved and adored by all emergency providers because another abscess is waiting just behind the curtain. This month we highlight general guidelines for abscess incision and drainage, and show how to treat one in the video below. We will follow up with some additional videos in the months to come focusing on scalp, vaginal, and facial abscesses. And, just when you think you have seen it all, we will reveal a few more surprises.   Axillary abscess from hidradenitis. Photo by Martha Roberts.   The Approach n  Identification of an abscess appropriate ...
Source: The Procedural Pause - March 31, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Pearls for Abscess Incision and Drainage
Part 2 in a Series Abscess incision and drainage should be loved and adored by all emergency providers because another abscess is waiting just behind the curtain. This month we highlight general guidelines for abscess incision and drainage, and show how to treat one in the video below. We will follow up with some additional videos in the months to come focusing on scalp, vaginal, and facial abscesses. And, just when you think you have seen it all, we will reveal a few more surprises.   Axillary abscess from hidradenitis. Photo by Martha Roberts.   The Approach n  Identification of an abscess ap...
Source: The Procedural Pause - March 31, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Truth in advertising: When is a doctor really a doctor?
A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. In an emergency, the first question people often ask is: “Is there a doctor in the house?” When you have a medical problem, the best advice is, “Ask your doctor.”  Most people automatically assume that “doctor” in this context refers to a physician with a medical degree. Dentists, chiropractors, and podiatrists are well-educated professionals who may also be addressed as “doctor,” but there’s no question that their training and specialization is different. Continue read...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 27, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Physician Payments Sunshine: Minnesota Releases Transparency Template
As the federal Sunshine Act has rolled out over the last year, Minnesota has been one of the few states that has added additional reporting requirements for drug (not device) manufacturers to track. By May 1, 2015, drug manufacturers must report on their 2014 transfers of value made to physician assistants, APRNs, dental therapists, and veterinarians. These entities are excluded from the Federal reporting obligations. This week, Minnesota has released its reporting payment template. Downloadable spreadsheet to report payments to practitioners calendar year 2014. The reportable elements include: First and Last Name o...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 14, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Physician Payments Sunshine Act: Open Payments is Missing a Lot of Data
Open Payments currently presents a vague portrait of how pharmaceutical and device manufacturers interact with physicians. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) noted on Monday that $3.3 billion out of $4.6 billion total payments from industry are either missing or de-identified. View their Fact Sheet here. Upon release of the database on September 30, Open Payments showed $3.5 billion in payments in various categories. This included 1.7 million records, totaling $2.2 billion, which were de-identified. On Monday, CMS announced that they actually withheld an additional $1.1 billion from the database. This mak...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 8, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Podiatrist Charged with Medicare Fraud
Philadelphia podiatrist Dr. Aileen Gong has been indicted on charges that she fraudulently billed Medicare over $480,000 for procedures that she never performed. Gong, who practices in the Chinatown section of Philadelphia, was allegedly out of Philadelphia during the times she claimed she performed the procedures. The post Podiatrist Charged with Medicare Fraud appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - October 6, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Medical News Wire Aileen Gong chinatown fraud medicare Philadelphia podiatrist Source Type: blogs

Physician Payments Sunshine Act: Organizations Respond to CMS
  September 2nd marked the last day for comments on CMS’ proposed rule to eliminate the accredited continuing medical education (CME) exemption from Sunshine Act reporting.  In an overwhelming display of support for the exemption, over 800 comments were submitted encouraging the agency to either maintain or expand the current exclusion. -Total comments supporting maintenance or expansion of the CME exemption:  820 -Total comments supporting elimination of the CME exemption:  approximately 20 -Percentage of comments supporting the CME exemption: 98% We have followed this issue closely, and recentl...
Source: Policy and Medicine - September 8, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

The Airia Running Shoes to Improve Performance
I have been following the development and social media spread of these shoes for a while. There was first a thread on Podiatry Arena (which the Airia CEO contributes) and I then did two blog posts about them: The new ‘biomechanically perfect’ running shoe from Airia?Another look at the performance claims by the Airia One running shoe; a theoretical contextThese two posts pretty much sum up my views on the shoes.The shoe comes with a lateral forefoot wedge or slant and claims that this can enhance performance. The company has some data that this is the case and I presented in those blog posts a theoretical conte...
Source: Podiatry Update - August 22, 2014 Category: Chiropodists Authors: Craig Source Type: blogs

Working Together to Manage Diabetes Webinar
Providers of pharmacy, podiatry, optometry, and dentistry (PPOD) are well positioned to advise and educate patients about diabetes control and prevention. They may be the first to see a person with or at risk for diabetes. The National Diabetes Education Program presents a free webinar to learn about a new toolkit for PPOD practitioners. The toolkit was developed to show how healthcare professionals can work collaboratively in their communities to promote better health outcomes. Working Together to Manage Diabetes: Tools and Strategies for Pharmacy, Podiatry, Optometry, and Dentistry will be presented August 18, 2014, 12:0...
Source: BHIC - August 6, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Patricia Devine Tags: General Minority Health Concerns Source Type: blogs