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What is the best antidote for a jellyfish sting? (Clue: it's not urine)
A new study of the man o ’ war jellyfish found popular remedies like lemon juice and shaving foam make stings worse. Vinegar followed by heat is most effectiveWhat should you do if a jellyfish stings you? Scientists have found that applying vinegar is the best solution, and that popular remedies including urine, lemon juice, and shaving foam could make the situation worse.Arecent study in Toxins, which investigated the efficacy of various remedies for stings from the Portuguese man o ’ war (Physalia physalis) concludes that rinsing with vinegar before applying heat is the most effective treatment. The commonly ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amy Lewis Tags: Marine life Science Poison Environment Wildlife Oceans Research Source Type: news

[Report] Eocene lantern fruits from Gondwanan Patagonia and the early origins of Solanaceae
We report 52.2-million-year-old lantern fruits from terminal-Gondwanan Patagonia, featuring highly inflated, five-lobed calyces, as a newly identified species of the derived, diverse New World genus Physalis (e.g., groundcherries and tomatillos). The fossils are considerably older than corresponding molecular divergence dates and demonstrate an ancient history for the inflated calyx syndrome. The derived position of these early Eocene fossils shows that Solanaceae were well diversified long before final Gondwanan breakup. Authors: Peter Wilf, Mónica R. Carvalho, María A. Gandolfo, N. Rubén Cúneo...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Peter Wilf Source Type: news

Moth takes advantage of defensive compounds in Physalis fruits
Researchers found that the specialist moth Heliothis subflexa benefits from secondary plant components by turning the original defensive function of these compounds into its own advantage. Withanolides, which are present in Physalis plants, usually act as immune suppressants and feeding deterrents in insects. Surprisingly, Heliothis subflexa uses these plant defenses as immune-system boosters. Moreover, withanolides protect the moth from harmful effects caused by pathogenic bacteria. The new study demonstrates a unique benefit to host-plant specialization. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Moth takes advantage of defensive compounds in Physalis fruits
(Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology) Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology found that the specialist moth Heliothis subflexa benefits from secondary plant components by turning the original defensive function of these compounds into its own advantage. Withanolides, which are present in Physalis plants, usually act as immune suppressants and feeding deterrents in insects. Surprisingly, Heliothis subflexa uses these plant defenses as immune-system boosters. Moreover, withanolides protect the moth from harmful effects caused by pathogenic bacteria. The new study demonstrates a unique benefit to...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 26, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An outbreak of Portuguese man-of-war (Physalia physalis - Linnaeus, 1758) envenoming in Southeastern Brazil - Haddad Junior V, Virga R, Bechara A, Silveira FL, Morandini AC.
We report the clinical and therapeutic aspects of ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - August 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Non-Human Animals and Insects Source Type: news